Sunday May 27, 2018
Home Business Jayant Sinha ...

Jayant Sinha calls for investing in Indian start-ups to encourage innovation

0
//
72
www.blackmoney.co.in
Republish
Reprint

NewsGram Staff Writer

Panaji: Minister of State for Finance Jayant Sinha, stressing on the need to encourage a culture of innovation in the country, urged India  Inc. to make investments in the country’s start-ups to address the nation’s problems.

“In order to encourage innovation in India, we need to invest in Indian start-ups that address Indian problems. As a market, we have tremendous opportunities in India, and the same innovations are finding markets in other economies too,” he said at the inaugural edition of the Global Business Forum(GBF) , an initiative of Indian Institute of Technology-Bombay alumni association, held near Panaji.

Sinha also said that places like Powai, in Mumbai, where the IIT-B is located and Bengaluru; upcoming townships like Gurgaon should be developed as innovation hubs for India.

“The way we see it, these factors place our future in our own hands and I can see how Powai – home to IIT Bombay, and Gurgaon and Bengaluru can be the innovation hubs for the 6 billion people that inhabit the developing world,” he said.

The GBF is aimed at creating impactful technological innovations in products and services through focused dialogue based on national priorities like education, skill, infrastructure, healthcare, smart cities, energy, Information Communication technology, environment (Water) and the Make in India campaign.

(With inputs from IANS)

 

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2015 NewsGram

Next Story

Depression Can Negatively Impact Heart Patients

In another study, the team found that heart attack patients diagnosed with depression were 54 percent more likely to be hospitalised

0
//
32
Over 5 crore people in India are known to suffer depressive disorders Pixabay
Over 5 crore people in India are known to suffer depressive disorders Pixabay

Depression, even when undiagnosed, can have many negative effects on patients with cardiovascular diseases, including poor healthcare experiences and higher health costs, say researchers.

The study found that people at high risk of depression were more than five times more likely to have a poor self-perceived health status and almost four times more likely to be dissatisfied with their healthcare.

The intake of probiotics may prevent depression
Heart diseases can be worsened by Depression. Wikimedia Commons

Patients at high risk of depression had notably worse healthcare-related quality of life. They spent more on overall and out-of-pocket healthcare expenditures yearly.

They were more than two times more likely to be hospitalised and have an increased use of the emergency room, said the researchers while presenting the results at the American Heart Association’s Quality of Care and Outcomes Research Scientific Sessions 2018 in Virginia.

Also Read: Knee pain can trigger depression in elderly

“This could be because people at high risk for depression simply haven’t been diagnosed and treated for depression yet,” said Victor Okunrintemi, a research student at Baptist Health South Florida, a US-based non-profit.

In another study, the team found that heart attack patients diagnosed with depression were 54 per cent more likely to be hospitalised and 43 per cent more likely to have emergency room visits, compared to those not diagnosed with depression.

depression
Depression can be worsen. Wikimedia Commons

“Depression and heart attack often coexist, which has been associated with worse health experiences for these patients,” Okunrintemi said. About one-fifth of cardiovascular disease patients suffer from depression. “While we don’t know which comes first — depression or cardiovascular disease — the consensus is that depression is a risk marker for cardiovascular disease,” Okunrintemi said.

It means that “if you have cardiovascular disease, there is a higher likelihood that you could also have depression, when compared with the risk in the general population”, he added. IANS

Next Story