JNUSU poll: Kremlin on banks of Yamuna


By Sagar Sethi

Party Activists waiting for voters after a low turnout in the first half (1280x1034)

After the plebeian presidential debate that initiated on September 8 and continued till the wee hours on September 9, save one Kanhaiya, the student community of JNU stamped their votes on September 11. The morning began with tea, and Lal Salaam or Vande Mataram!

Amidst all the sloganeering and dafli beats AISF’s Presidential candidate Kanhaiya Kumar tells us how the culture of sloganeering in JNU has changed.

Sirf 8 din mein parties ko apne candidate project karna padhta hai, toh who traditional slogans ke baje candidates ke naamo se naara laga rahe hai,” says Kumar.

Owing to the Lyngdoh Committee’s recommendations, students feel more disconnected from their representatives. Consequently, politics in the Red Bastion has been largely reduced to advertising and image projection.

Title Picture (1280x862)

This would even explain the measly turnout of voters in JNU this year. Much like the redness of JNU walls, the glory of its progressive politics is also fading.

Alongside this massive de-politicization is an ongoing DU-isation of JNU. So what lies in store for a future JNUite – the fate of another brick in the wall?

Elections (1280x720)

In about forty eight hours, JNU’s Election Commission will declare the results of this year’s election. Will AISA’s ‘Vijay, Shehla, Rama, Hamid,’ win it? Or will ABVP’s Gaurav? The real question is, what next?

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