Tuesday December 10, 2019
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India’s first genetic disease identification centre in Kerala

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Thiruvananthapuram: Kerala’s leading healthcare provider, KIMS Hospital, today announced the launch of the first genetic disease identification centre in collaboration with MedGenome India.

MI Sahadulla, chairman, KIMS Healthcare Group said their mission was to help patients and families with various genetic conditions through expert counselling and state of the art genetic testing facilities, in complete confidentiality.

This new collaboration envisages genetic counselling and testing for rare and common genetic, hereditary diseases that includes various types of cancers, cardiovascular, neurological and gastrointestinal diseases, Sahadulla said.

In the first phase of the collaboration, the specialists at KIMS hospital will help identify patients at possible risk of a genetic condition and refer them to a counsellor who are specialised in gathering and analysing family history and inheritance patterns of the disease.

They will provide information about genetic testing and related procedures for further investigations and treatment.

In the second phase, statistical incidence, data collection and a community-based studies will be initiated.

“MedGenome will also partner with the clinicians in gaining underlying genetics insights into several human diseases and thereby address the pressing health problems of the common man,” said Girish Mehta, CEO, MedGenome India.

Today congenital and hereditary genetic diseases are becoming a significant health burden in India, and hence, there is a need for adequate and effective genetic testing and counselling services and in Kerala, this new partnership is certainly going to help such patients. (IANS)

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Research Shows that People with Genetic Autism are Likely to Report Self-Harm Thoughts

For the study, the research team calculated the genetic likelihood for autism in 100,000 individuals from the UK Biobank Study

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Autism
Those with the highest genetic predisposition to Autism on an average have 28 per cent increase in childhood maltreatment and a 33 per cent increase in self-harm and suicidal ideation compared to those with the lowest genetic predisposition to Autism. Pixabay

People with a higher genetic likelihood of autism are more likely to report higher childhood maltreatment, self-harm and suicidal thoughts, according to a new study by an Indian-origin researcher.

The study, published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, shows that the findings hold true even for those with a higher genetic likelihood of autism rather than a formal diagnosis.

Previous studies from the University of Cambridge established that autistic individuals experience higher levels of self-harm, including suicidal thoughts and feelings, and higher rates of childhood maltreatment.

“This new study extends our earlier work by showing that individuals who carry more of the genes associated with autism have higher risks for maltreatment and self-harm,” said study researcher Simon Baron-Cohen, Professor at University of Cambridge.

“Our work highlighting unacceptably higher rates of suicide in autistic people was published 5 years ago, yet almost no new support has been provided,” Baron-Cohen added.

For the study, the research team calculated the genetic likelihood for autism in 100,000 individuals from the UK Biobank Study who had their DNA analysed and had also provided self-reported information about childhood maltreatment, suicidal ideation and self-harm.

Those with the highest genetic predisposition to autism on an average have 28 per cent increase in childhood maltreatment and a 33 per cent increase in self-harm and suicidal ideation compared to those with the lowest genetic predisposition to autism.

Autism
This new study extends our earlier work by showing that individuals who carry more of the genes associated with Autism have higher risks for maltreatment and self-harm. Pixabay

“While we have found an association between a genetic likelihood for autism and adverse life events, we cannot conclude the former causes the latter,” said study lead author and Indian-origin researcher Varun Warrier.

“We suspect this association reflects that genes partly influence how many autistic traits you have, and some autistic traits such as difficulties in social understanding may lead to a person to be vulnerable to maltreatment, Warrier added.

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This research highlights the risks of such adverse outcomes for those with a high number of autistic traits, if adequate safeguarding and support aren’t provided. (IANS)