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Know why Goddess Parvati asked Lord Shiva’s sister Devi Asavari to leave Kailasha!

Hindu Mythology is full of incidents and stories that one can relate to their own life even today

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Lord Shiva. Image source: Wikimedia Commons
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September 2, 2016: India is a multi-diversity country and despite people belonging to different castes, classes, traditions, ideas, values, and religions, they leave in harmony. Hindu Mythology is full of incidents and stories that one can relate to their own life even today. This shows how modern Hindu faith is. Amid all the stories, there is one about Lord Shiva and her unnamed sister, who he later named as Devi Asavari and that she was created by Shiva on his wife’s insistence.

India is a land where various legends and myths existed since, the very beginning. The same is applied for the Hindu Mythologies as people believed that these tales were only stories and they have no real life significance attached to it. What most of us missed is that apart from teach us the art of living, these texts also exposed the harsh realities of the dominant Patriarchal society, where people were exploited and discriminated on the basis of caste or gender. Here are few stories that will explain this better-

Lord Rama was not the first child born in the Kingdom of Ayodhya. In reality, he had an elder sister named Shanta who was abandoned and left by her father as she was a girl and not a boy. Thus, gender discrimination existed in the Indian civilisation from the beginning. – Ramayana

As according to Shiv Puranas, Lord Shiva had a sister too. Devi Asavari was created by Shiva on his wife’s insistence. As she used to miss her family madly when they were settled in Kailasha. Therefore, she requested her husband to give her a sister-like companion with whom she could share her feelings and emotions when she was lonely. She demanded this, as she was the only woman in the entire clan in Kailasha which was filled with men. Hence, Lord Shiva followed his wife’s plea on one condition that she would take care of her ‘sister -in -law’ very happily. To which, Parvati agreed.

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Soon, he created a woman similar to him with all his knowledge and power. According to various books, Devi Asavari was a very plump woman with long hair. She had cracked feet and thus, she used to wear nothing except animal skin.

After some time, Lord Shiva took his wife to his sister Devi Asavari and Parvati was overwhelmed with emotions to meet her for the first time. Devi Asavari used to eat a lot due to which the entire food storage of Kailasha was getting affected. Hence, Parvati became totally helpless and depressed as she could not meet the needs of Devi Asavari.

Devi Asavari was hard to control and very soon, Parvati got fed up with the increasing demands and rudeness of Asavari that she decided to break her promise of taking care of her sister-in-law forever. She asked forgiveness for the same from her husband.

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Therefore, Lord Shiva decided to instill his sister with some good etiquettes and then, marry her off. To which Parvati said, she has no problem with Asavari if she would behave properly with her. But, this time, her husband dismissed her suggestion saying that ” If you cannot have someone at their worst then, you must not have them at their best.” This shows that Lord Shiva was an epitome of righteousness since, he believed in giving a chance to his sister to change herself to have a better future, unlike his wife who desperately wanted a companion but, could not handle the difficult situations courageously.

– by Namra Zahid of NewsGram 

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Copyright 2016 NewsGram

  • Antara

    Wow! Intriguing info!

  • Aakash Mandyal

    Our scriptures are rich in knowledge and as well as facinating too. They are not only the stories but have deep hidden meaning behind this

Next Story

Right of Nature: Are Rivers Living Beings?

Should rivers be considered Living Entities?

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Right of Nature
Many cultures across the globe believe that rivers are living beings or Gods/Goddesses and they just take the form of water bodies.

By Dr. Bharti Raizada, Chicago

Science says that water bodies are not living entities, as water does not need food, does not grow, and reproduce. Water is required for life, but in itself it is nonliving.

However, many cultures across the globe believe that rivers are living beings or Gods/Goddesses and they just take the form of water bodies.

The Maori tribe in New Zealand considers the Whanganui River as their ancestor and the Maori people fought to get it a legal status as a living being. In 2017, a court in New Zealand gave this river the status of living being and same rights as humans, to protect it from pollution. Thus, now if someone pollutes in it then it is considered equivalent to harming a human.

ALSO READ: Worshiping mother nature part of our tradition: Prime Minister Narendra Modi

Right of Nature
Rivers are sacred in many religions, including Hinduism. Image courtesy: Dr. Bharti Raizada

Rivers are sacred in Hinduism also. Hindus believe that the Ganga descended from heaven and call her Ganga Maa. A few days after New Zealand’s court decision, Uttarakhand high court in India gave the Ganga and Yamuna rivers and their tributaries the status of living human entities. The Court-appointed three officials as legal custodians. However, the court did not clarify many aspects related to this decision.

After this verdict some of the questions, which naturally came to mind, were:

Can Hindus still do rituals of flowing ashes, leaves, flowers, diyas in river or no? Can a dam be built on the river after this judgment? If some damage, to a person, animal, plants, or property, occurs because of river e.g. overflow, hurricanes, flooding etc., how the river will pay the liabilities? What if all rivers, oceans, ponds etc. are given the status of living beings? Will drinking water from river become a crime? What about taking water and using it for routine needs,  agriculture or building structures? Will it be illegal? If a child throws a stone in water, will it be a criminal act? Will fishing be considered stealing? What about boating? If someone is using heat near water and water evaporates, is it equal to taking the body part of a human being? What about taking a bath in the river?

Right of Nature
If the river gets a living status, as human, then we cannot use it for anything without its permission, so everyone has to stop touching the water. Image courtesy: Dr. Bharti Raizada

ALSO READ: Decoding supernatural: What is the nature of entities and gods who influence human behavior

Other queries, which arise, are:

Will animals and plants get the same status? What if you kill an ant or a chicken etc. or cut a tree? Will all animals and plants get a legal custodian?

Where is all the waste supposed to go? It has to go somewhere back in nature, right?

Uttrakhand state government challenged the judgement in Supreme Court and the latter reversed the judgment.

Right of Nature
So where do we stand? In my opinion, granting living status to nature is a different thing than giving protected status or preserving nature. Image by Dr. Bharti Raizada

ALSO READ: How nature destroys the negative tendencies in a positive manner

Ecuador’s constitution recognized the Right of Nature to exist, specifically Vilcabamba river, in 2008.

Then Bolivia passed the law of the right of mother earth and granted Nature equal rights as humans.

Many communities in the U.S.A. passed the Right of Nature law.

These laws are creating a dilemma or quandary also, as people need to use these resources. We cannot live without using natural resources. However, there is a difference between using natural resources and afflicting or destroying these. So, please use natural resources very diligently. Try not to vitiate nature.

On World Water Day (March 22), please start taking care of rivers, so that there is no need for future celebrations. It should not be a one-day celebration anyway, we should scrupulously look out for nature all the time.

Dr. Raizada is a practicing anesthesiologist.