Tuesday April 24, 2018

Kun-Faya & Fun art exhibition at India Habitat Centre in Delhi

"The acrylic colors from tubes are directly put on canvas and I used my fingers to draw the paintings"

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Painting at India Habitat Centre (Representational image, Credits-Wikimedia)
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New Delhi, February 8, 2017: Artist Ghazali Moinuddin’s solo art show titled “Kun-Faya-Fun” presented the audience its vibe & ethereal colors depicting the various shades of the nature.

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Organised at India Habitat Centre in the national capital, his paintings are all landscapes which show the beauty of the Nature. From the mist trapped within the woods to the mountain peaks covered in snow, Moinuddin’s every stroke brings it all alive.

Moinuddin has not drawn any inspiration while painting this series, for him it is all about his imagination. For him, nature has no boundaries, it has freedom.

“Imagination and inspiration are contradictory for me, it is disturbing rather. My paintings depend a lot on my mood. I have not been much to any hill station in past few years but all these are an outcome of my imaginative power,” Moinuddin told IANS.

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The artist didn’t use any brush while working on the 40 paintings. “The acrylic colours from tubes are directly put on canvas and I used my fingers to draw the paintings,” he said about his art work which took him two years to complete.

“The semi-realistic paintings create a 3D effect, the more you keep distance from the paintings, the better you can visualise it,” the artist said about his paintings.

The exhibition will go on till February 9, 2017. (IANS)

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Primitive Art: Neanderthals Were Europe’s First Painters

Neanderthals died out about 40,000 years ago, soon after direct ancestors arrived in Europe

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Neanderthal paintings can be seen in a cave in Pasiega, Spain in this photo obtained Feb. 22, 2018. University of Southampton. VOA

The world’s oldest known cave paintings were made by Neanderthals, not modern humans, suggesting our extinct cousins were far from being uncultured brutes.

A high-tech analysis of cave art at three Spanish sites, published on Thursday, dates the paintings to at least 64,800 years ago, or 20,000 years before modern humans arrived in Europe from Africa.

That makes the cave art much older than previously thought and provides the strongest evidence yet that Neanderthals had the cognitive capacity to understand symbolic representation, a central pillar of human culture.

ALSO READ: French Scientists discover World’s oldest structure built by Neanderthals about 170,000 years ago

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While some archaeologists already viewed Neanderthals as more sophisticated than their commonplace caricature, the evidence until now has been inconclusive. Pixabay

“What we’ve got here is a smoking gun that really overturns the notion that Neanderthals were knuckle-dragging cavemen,” said Alistair Pike, professor of archaeological sciences at the University of Southampton, who co-led the study.

“Painting is something that has always been seen as a very human activity, so if Neanderthals are doing it they are being just like us,” he told Reuters.

With the data from the three Spanish cave sites described in the journal Science, Pike and colleagues believe they finally have rock-solid proof.

The early cave art at La Pasiega, Maltravieso and Ardales includes lines, dots, discs and hand stencils — and creating them would have involved specific skills, such as mixing pigments and selecting appropriate display locations.

The Neanderthals living in the same land that would one day give birth to Diego Velazquez and Pablo Picasso also needed the intellectual ability to think symbolically, like modern humans.

Scientists used a precise dating system based on the radioactive decay of uranium isotopes into thorium to assess the age of the paintings. This involved scraping a few milligrams of calcium carbonate deposit from the paintings for analysis.

A second related study published in Science Advances found that dyed and decorated marine shells from a different Spanish cave also dated back to pre-human times.

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Taken together, the researchers said their work suggested that Neanderthals were “cognitively indistinguishable” from early modern humans. Pixabay

ALSO READ: How About Some Tasty Woolly Rhinoceros for Dinner?

Joao Zilhao of the University of Barcelona said the new findings meant the search for the origins of human cognition needed to go back to the common ancestor of both Neanderthals and modern humans more than 500,000 years ago.

Neanderthals died out about 40,000 years ago, soon after direct ancestors arrived in Europe. It is unclear what killed them off, although theories include an inability to adapt to climate change and increased competition from modern humans.

If they were still alive today, Pike believes they could well have gone on developing complex art and technology.

“If they had been given the time, the resources and the population, then they might have ended up in some version of the world we live in today.” (VOA)