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L Subramaniam to perform in Oman


Dubai: L Subramaniam, popularly known as the god of the violin by Indian music experts, will perform in the gala dinner that is hosted for the speakers of the second edition of Open Minds conference in Oman on February 10 and 11.

The dinner, which is being held in honour of the speakers of the two-day thought festival, will be held at the Turtle Beach – a secluded beach located on the edge of the mountain of Shangri-La in Muscat on the evening of February 10, the Times of Oman reported.

Subramaniam, hailed as the “Paganini of Indian classical music,” is known to combine the serenity of Indian classical music with the magnetism of western music to conquer audiences with the elegance and virtuosity of his style.

Arguably the country’s best-known contemporary violinist, he thrives on reinventing his music so it is in harmony with the listeners’ evolving and changing tastes.

He is the only musician who has performed and recorded south Indian classical music, western classical music, both orchestral and non-orchestral and also composed for and conducted major orchestras; he has scored for films and collaborated with a wide range of musicians from different genres of music. Critics cite him as a, “musical force that is strongly Indian, but universal in nature and approach.”

Subramaniam is all set to dazzle with a “fusion music performance” at the dinner.

The central theme of the Open Minds forum is that an “open mind will help open doors” and the forum sets to synergise, motivate and educate (SME) young Omani entrepreneurs,” a spokesperson from the Black & White, organisers of the event, was quoted as saying, adding that the event is packed with “experience, knowledge, thoughts, positivity, inspiration, attitude, entertainment and presentation”.

The two-day thought leadership forum will feature some of the topmost thought leaders of the world who will provide an intellectual treat with words of wisdom and inspiring tales to all those who wish to have their minds open.

The list of global speakers includes entrepreneur Chris Gardner, Princess Beatrice of York, Dutch football legend Ruud Gullit and other thought and change leaders of the world.(IANS)(

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Pentavalent vaccine: Doctors raise red flag

In spite of the data presented in this paper from a large cohort, the authors point out that the evidence is merely circumstantial and not conclusive

the new Hepatitis B vaccine for adults is called Heplisav-B.
India's PV to be reexamined because of its harmful effects. .
  • Pentavalent vaccine was introduced in India six years ago
  • It is since then have been a cause of many deaths
  • Doctors want it to be reexamined before continuing its use

Pentavalent vaccine (PV), that was introduced by India a little over six years ago, doubled the deaths of children soon after vaccination compared to the DPT (Diphtheria-Pertussis-Tetanus) vaccine, according to a new study that calls for a “rigorous review of the deaths following vaccination with PV”.

Health officials have launched a campaign targeting nearly 24 million people with a one-fifth dose of the vaccine. Wikimedia Commons
PV has been cause of many deaths in past years. Wikimedia Commons

Government records show that there were 10,612 deaths following vaccination (both PV and DPT) in the last 10 years. There was a huge increase in these numbers in 2017, which the Health Ministry has promised to study. “The present analysis could be a starting point in the quest to reduce the numbers of such deaths,” authors of the new study say.

The study by Dr Jacob Puliyel, Head of Pediatrics at St Stephens Hospital, and Dr V. Sreenivas, Professor of Biostatistics at the All-India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), both in New Delhi, is published in the peer-reviewed Medical Journal of Dr D.Y. Patil University.

PV is a combination of the DPT vaccine and two more vaccines against Haemophilus influenza type B (Hib) and hepatitis B. Starting December 2011, PV was introduced into India’s immunisation programme to replace DPT vaccine in a staged manner with a view to adding protection against Hib and Hepatitis B without increasing the number of injections given to infants.

Doctors have raised concerns over these vaccines. Wikimedia Commons
Doctors have raised concerns over these vaccines. Wikimedia Commons

But sporadic reports of unexplained deaths following immunisation with PV had been a matter of concern. Puliyel, Sreenivas and their colleagues undertook the study to find out if these deaths were merely coincidental or vaccine-induced.

The authors obtained data of all deaths reported from April 2012 to May 2016 under the Right to Information Act. Data on deaths within 72 hours of administering DPT and PV from different states were used.

For their study, the authors assumed that all deaths within 72 hours of receiving DPT are natural deaths. Using this figure as the baseline, they presumed that any increase in the number of deaths above this baseline among children receiving PV must be caused by this vaccine.

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According to their analysis of the data provided by the government, there were 237 deaths within 72 hours of administering the Pentavalent vaccine — twice the death rate among infants who received DPT vaccine.

Extrapolating the data, the authors have estimated that vaccination of 26 million children each year in India would result in 122 additional deaths within 72 hours, due to the switch from DPT to PV.

“There is likely to be 7,020 to 8,190 deaths from PV each year if data from states with the better reporting, namely Manipur and Chandigarh, are projected nationwide,” their report says.

It is important to make sure that these vaccines are reexamined peroperly. VOA

The authors note that while the study looks at the short-term increase in deaths (within three days of vaccination) it does not calculate the potential benefits of PV on infant mortality, for example by protection against lethal diseases like Haemophilus influenza.

In spite of the data presented in this paper from a large cohort, the authors point out that the evidence is merely circumstantial and not conclusive. “These findings of differential death rates between DPT and PV do call for further rigorous prospective population-based investigations,” the study concludes. IANS