Lohri celebrated across India


“Sunder mundriye ho!
Terakaunvicharaa ho!
Dullah Bhatti walla ho!
Dullhe di dheevyayae ho!
Sershakkar payee ho! …………“

Lohri is celebrated with great pomp and fervor in north India, especially by Punjabi, to mark the perfect time to harvest the Rabi crops. Lohri also marks the end of winter season and is observed on the last day of the Hindi month Paush, and the beginning of Magha.

People worship the goddess of Lohri which is beautifully crafted from cow dung. Late in the evening,  a bonfire is lit up which is associated with the start of longer days.It is also an image of energy and spiritual strength. People sit around it and continuously sing till the bonfire burns down. Food including peanuts, popcorn and sweets made of til-chirva, gajak and revri are eaten and simultaneously poured into bonfires a tradition.This ritual is performed for thanking the Sun God and seeking his continued protection.

Lohri is generally celebrated privately by people at their respective houses, but in houses where there has been a childbirth or any marriage, the festival is comparatively celebrated at a larger level, inviting guests and relatives.

Other stuff that is symbolic with Lohri, issarson da saag with makki di roti, People dress up themselves with bright clothes and be a part of the celebrations. They dance on the beats of dhol marking their excitement and exchange greetings.


(Inputs from Mukul Gogna)(Image-boxofficecollections)