Sunday March 18, 2018
Home India Meet Saanya V...

Meet Saanya Verma: 11 year old highest scorer in Mensa IQ test


New Delhi: Saanya Verma, an 11-year-old Indian girl in Britain scored the maximum possible marks in the MENSA IQ test. She has scored 162 – the highest possible score on a Mensa test which only one per cent of the population have achieved.

Newsgram personally interviewed Sunita Pati Verma, the proud mother of the year 7 girl, studying in a leading independent school in London.

Mensa invites only those students who are able to achieve top 2 percent score on either of diagrammatical test or the verbal reasoning ability. Mensa spokesperson confirmed it and said that she is one of the youngest to achieve this feat.

A student of year 7 in a leading independent school in London, Saanya has a bagful of choices and interests when it comes to studies. A voracious reader who is interested in Maths and Cosmos from the beginning. Her mother Sunita Pati Verma told NewsGram that Saanya these days has developed an interest in robotics. She has also been developing the codes for the robots (Lego Mindstorms) and electronic instruments (Arduino).

The Library Monitor of her school, Saanya enjoys reading. She is part of many clubs in school like Debating, Science, Maths, French and current affairs.

Her father, a banker by profession, Sunil Verma spends a reasonable amount of time with her discussing areas like science and robotics. He says that Saanya surprises him with questions.

She further added that Saanya has loved every visit to India. She believes in the act of sharing and she hopes to influence children to take an active part in the education. She wants to help in encouraging children to study and shine across the world.

Her mother said that this is a proud moment not just for the family but the whole Indian community. She says India has been an important part of the journey. A lot of the family members are still back in India and they are happy of her achievement.

Saanya Verma’s success is the story of a girl, who has shown signs of brilliance that could help her do great things for herself and the society. However, the challenge starts from here, the guidance and preservation will be important.

Saanya like any other 11-year-old has a lot of aspirations. She wants to be a scientist, or may be a mathematician or may be a banker like her father. One thing is clear if she keeps getting the same support and working hard, she will be able to attain great heights.(Image-Sunita Verma)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2016 NewsGram

Next Story

Here’s how eating fish could be IQ booster for your kid

Fish acts like an IQ booster. Here's how!
Fish acts like an IQ booster. Here's how! Pixabay

Want to sharpen your kids’ mental skills and boost intelligence quotient (IQ) levels? Fish will act as an IQ booster.

The findings show:

  • Children who eat fish at least once a week sleep better
  • Have IQ scores that are four points higher, on average, than those who consume fish less frequently or not at all.
  • Those whose meals sometimes included fish scored 3.3 points higher.
  • Increased fish consumption was associated with fewer disturbances of sleep, which the researchers say indicates better overall sleep quality.
Other than acting as an IQ booster, fish has many other benefits Pixabay
Other than acting as an IQ booster, fish has many other benefits Pixabay

How it was done

For the study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, a cohort of 541 nine to 11-year-olds in China — 54 per cent boys and 46 per cent girls — completed a questionnaire about how often they consumed fish in the past month.

Their parents then answered questions about sleep quality, which included topics such as sleep duration and frequency of night waking or daytime sleepiness.

Fish has omega-3 which reduces anti-social behavior Pixabay
Fish has omega-3 which reduces anti-social behavior Pixabay

Connected dots

Previous studies showed a relationship between omega-3s, the fatty acids in many types of fish, and improved intelligence, as well as omega-3s and better sleep. But they’ve never all been connected before.

The new study reveals sleep as a possible mediating pathway — the potential missing link between fish and intelligence, the researchers said.

“Lack of sleep is associated with antisocial behaviour, poor cognition is associated with antisocial behaviour,” said Adrian Raine, Professor at the University of Pennsylvania.

“We have found that omega-3 supplements reduce antisocial behaviour, so it’s not too surprising that fish is behind this.”

The study “adds to the growing body of evidence showing that fish consumption has really positive health benefits and should be something more heavily advertised and promoted”, said Jennifer Pinto-Martin, Professor at the varsity. (IANS)