Thursday April 26, 2018
Home Uncategorized Montclair Sta...

Montclair State University launches Meditation Program, Hindus welcome the move

0
//
128
Photo: wp.nootheme.com

North Carolina: Hindus are commending launch of seven-week long “Mind. Body. Being.” Program at Montclair State University (MSU) in New Jersey, calling it a step in the positive direction.

It combines yoga and meditation “with the goal of developing a more compassionate relationship with food, body and self.  Members will learn important skills for relaxation, connecting with one’s body and attending to its need for nourishment,” a program announcement says

Hindu statesman Rajan Zed, in a statement in Nevada today, thanked MSU for recognizing the intersection of spirituality and education and utilizing yoga and meditation for connecting with self. He further urged all universities and colleges of USA and Canada to offer meditation programs if they were serious in the all-round development of their students.

He noted that meditation had been valued in Hinduism for ages and Hindus had been traditionally practicing various forms/levels of meditation; including manana, pratyahara, dhayana, upasana, dharana and samadhi; to achieve oneness with Brahman. Hindus sought to train the attention inward—training the mind to focus internally and not wander.

MSU, founded in 1908, with main campus encompassing about 250 acres,  serves about 20, 500 students in about 300 majors-minors-concentrations-programs, including 134 graduate degree programs. Forbes’ listed MSU among America’s Top Colleges and MSU claims to have offered first doctoral program at a state college. Dr. Susan A. Cole is the President, while George J. Hiltzik is Trustees Board Chair.

Next Story

Daily meditation may keep you attentive in old age

"Meditation has the potential to alter longitudinal trajectories of cognitive change across a person's life," Zanesco added

0
//
21
Meditation, Wikimedia Commons
  • Meditation can help old people to stay attentive
  • Meditative practices can increase cognition
  • It can improve health overall

Want to stay attentive in your old age? Start doing meditation. Regular and intensive sessions over the course of a lifetime may help you to stay focused and attentive even in advanced years, according to a new study.

yoga posture that prevent from alzheimer
Meditation can increase attention span. wisdonquterly

“This study is the first to offer evidence that intensive and continued meditation practice is associated with enduring improvements in sustained attention and response inhibition,” said lead author of the study Anthony Zanesco, now at the University of Miami.

“Meditation has the potential to alter longitudinal trajectories of cognitive change across a person’s life,” Zanesco added. The research evaluates the benefits that people gained after three months of full-time meditation training and whether these benefits are maintained seven years later.

Also Read: Stem Cells May Help To Stay Strong In Old Age

This study, published in the Journal of Cognitive Enhancement, follows up on previous work by the same group of researchers at the University of California in 2011. The 2011 study assessed the cognitive abilities of a group of people who regularly meditated before and after they went on a three-month-long retreat.

After the first group’s initial retreat was over, the second group received similar intensive training. As part of this study, follow-up assessments were conducted six months, 18 months and seven years after completion of the retreats. During the last appraisal, participants were asked to estimate how much time over the course of seven years they had spent meditating outside of formal retreat settings, such as through daily or non-intensive practice.

Meditation is good, Vastu tips
Meditative practices can improve cognition. Pixabay

The participants who had remained in the study all reported some form of continued meditation practice — 85 percent attended at least one meditation retreat and they practised amounts on average that was comparable to an hour a day for seven years. The participants again completed assessments designed to measure their reaction time and ability to pay attention to a task. IANS

Next Story