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More than 21 percent of adults consume tobacco in HP: Kaul Singh

One person dies every six seconds due to tobacco: World Health Organization
One person dies every six seconds due to tobacco: World Health Organization

Shimla: More than 21 percent of the adults in Himachal Pradesh use some form of tobacco. These include over 880,000 smokers, far higher than tobacco chewers, said state Health Minister Kaul Singh.

The state has stepped up efforts to sustain the smoke-free status. Recently, it has banned the sale of single cigarettes and ‘bidi’, the minister said at a conference organized on tobacco control by Bloomberg in New York on Tuesday.

The hill state has a population of about 6.8 million.

Kaul Singh said the process of drafting a comprehensive legislation that conforms to the recommendation and the provisions of Article 5.3 of the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control is under way.

Singh said the state was declared smoke-free in July 2013 and now efforts are being made to make it the first fully-compliant state to all provisions of tobacco control laws.

Quoting the Global Adult Tobacco Survey (2009-10), the minister said the state has the highest age of initiation (nearly 21 years).

He said the government is making all-out efforts to implement the National Tobacco Control Program launched by the central government.

“Our focus now is to protect the non-smokers from the harms of tobacco smoke,” he added.


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Smoking during pregnancy linked to asthma severity in kids

Prenatal tobacco smoke exposure was associated with a 2.5 times increase in odds of having airflow obstruction in children with asthma

  • Smoking during pregnancy can be very dangerous
  • It can lead to asthma and poor lung function in the baby
  • It also can have serve effects on the health of the mother

Women who smoke while pregnant contribute to the severity of asthma and poor lung function in their children warns a study.

The findings published in the journal CHEST suggest that tobacco smoke exposure during pregnancy is more strongly associated with worse lung function than current, ongoing exposure in school-aged children with asthma.

Smoking during pregnancy can be unhealthy for the child.

“This study implicates maternal smoking in pregnancy as the period of second-hand exposure that is more strongly associated with worse lung function in asthmatic children,” said lead investigator Stacey-Ann Whittaker Brown from Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York.

“Maternal smoking in pregnancy may set children with asthma on a trajectory of poor lung function in later childhood, and other studies suggest this effect may be lifelong,” Whittaker Brown said.

Investigators analysed the relationship between lung function and the type of second-hand smoke exposure in a representative sample of school-aged children aged six to 11 years.

Also Read: Why you should avoid Paracetamol during pregnancy

The sample consisted of 2,070 children who participated in the 2007-2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) in the US.

Detailed information about ongoing second-hand smoke exposure as well as parental self-reported exposure prior to birth was obtained.

During the study period, lung function was measured using spirometry, and exposure to smoking was assessed through levels of cotinine in the blood, a marker of the extent of current second-hand smoke exposure. Thus, investigators were able to distinguish clearly between exposure in pregnancy and ongoing second-hand smoke exposure.

Protein responsible for postpartum depression in pregnancy found
Smoking during pregnancy is very dangerous. IANS

Nearly 10 percent of both children with and without asthma in the sample had reduced lung function.

Investigators found that current tobacco smoke exposure was independently associated with airflow obstruction in school-aged children, although the extent of the association was small.

However, prenatal tobacco smoke exposure was associated with a 2.5 times increase in odds of having airflow obstruction in children with asthma, the study said. IANS

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