Thursday October 19, 2017

Movie Cameras. From Reel to IMAX, From IMAX to Smart phones.

0
100
Photo Credit: www.clipartbest.com

 

By Atul Mishra

Muybridge sequence of a horse galloping
Muybridge sequence of a horse galloping

Cinematography has progressed profoundly and has seen diverse permutations and combinations in its echelon with the regular advancements in technology. Every year cinematographer gets stirred and sparked with the advent and inception of new sophisticated movie cameras. Let us trail the timeline to see how have movie cameras changed the face of silver screen and what is the motion movie milieu these days.

history-photo-camera-6

Capturing moving images were done on revolving drums and disk way back in 1830s. Gelatin-emulsioned film strips came into being in second half of 1800s and combined with paper film, gave us the earliest surviving motion picture till date: Louis Le Prince’s Roundhay Garden Scene, filmed on October 14, 1888.

220px--Roundhay_Garden_Scene.ogg

Kinetoscope, in 1893, which was a large box that only one person at a time could see the film on through a peephole, was a major advancement in the 35mm celluloid film strips. All these films were monochromes, two-toned. The color cinematography began in early 1900s. In 1908, kinemacolor was introduced. In the same year, the short film A Visit to the Seaside became the first natural color movie to be publicly presented. In 1929, Fox introduced Fox Grandeur, the first 70 mm film format.

 

Still from A Visit to the Seaside
Still from A Visit to the Seaside

Since then cinematography, and not just its post-shooting-additions, but the shooting itself has seen multitude of changes. Who would have thought in 1910s, that a century later, The Dark Knight, would feature six sequences (a total of 28 minutes) shot on IMAX camera? And who would have thought six years after The Dark Knight, Tangerine would be shot on three i-phones and have its world premiere at Sundance Film Festival?

tangerine-poster-e1435247358171

 

These days with the advent of so many cameras, from DSLRs to smart phones, amazing short films are being made by aspiring film makers. May be only Nolan can afford an IMAX, but if a film shot on an i-phone can be screened at Sundance then surely enough anyone possessing a decent smart phone can nail the magic of silver screens. Do these short films being shot on normal DSLRs and smart phones these days lose the aesthetic qualities of a film? Well, to shake your shaft here is what The Hollywood Reporter described the look of Tangerine as- “crisp and vigorously cinematic”, with “an aesthetic purity that stands out in a field where so much indie filmmaking has gotten glossier and less technically adventurous.”

322363,xcitefun-ship-of-theseus

Another giant shot on a DSLR is the 2013 indie film Ship of Theseus. This film that swooped two National Awards and various other accolades at many international film festivals, is visually enriched and starkly eye-catching, though being shot on a DSLR.

The Oscar contender for the next biggie Academy Olive has been completely shot on a smart phone and is considered the first feature film to do so.

dsc_9830

This is soon becoming a culture and cult. Good movies are being made and thanks to YouTube channels that these films reach out to many audience. And this is where the film makers stand today. Giants like Syncopy and 20th Century Fox may try their hands at IMAX, but the indie film enthusiasts these days are making their movies with their own IMAXs which not only justify the silver screen but garner various accolades across the globe.

Next Story

Era of the 1980s Filmmaking was about bringing a change and make it happen: Veteran filmmaker Govind Nihalani

0
43
Veteran filmmaker Govind Nihalani, Twitter (FTTI)

New Delhi, May 20, 2017: Veteran filmmaker Govind Nihalani on Saturday said the era of the 1980s was about bringing a change and make it happen in reaction to mainstream cinema. During that period, people witnessed movies from his generation of filmmakers including Satyajit Ray and Mrinal Sen.

At a time when films like “Qurbani”, “Alibaba Aur 40 Chor”, “Karz” and “Dostana” were ruling the box office with heavy duty star cast, glamour, dance and music, Nihalani says a movement of what was called “new cinema or parallel cinema” started to prove that such elements were not necessary to make a film work.

NewsGram brings to you latest new stories in India.

“When you ask how the films were made at that time… we had this movement going of new cinema or parallel cinema. That movement essentially started as a reaction to mainstream cinema,” Nihalani said here, during a panel discussion at the Habitat Film Festival.

“It brought out a thought that it was not necessary that you follow a pattern which was established by what we call now mainstream cinema. Which means you must have presence of stars, music, dance, there should be a happy ending… that was very important and that good wins over evil all the time,” he added.

Go to NewsGram and check out news related to political current issues.

The 76-year-old and the recipient of six National Film Awards said the filmmakers on the flip side proved that the glamour quotient was not necessary and that films that connect people can also be appreciated and work.

“You can make films that connect with the people. Other elements which connect you with the audience, which requires more human empathy, concern with anything other than being happy a the end of it all… The fact that you can make the difference. You can make the change happen.

Look for latest news from India in NewsGram.

 “When we started making films and the young generation that came in, they came with the idea that you can change something and that change is possible. At the core of it that was the thought. The stories that we chose, it had no stars, glamorous locations… whole thing was about the change and that we make it happen. Stories were chosen in that mood,” he added.

The other panellists include director Buddhadeb Dasgupta and filmmaker Avinash Das.

The Habitat Film Festival is being held until May 28 at the India Habitat Centre.

Other movies which are yet to be screened here include “East is East”, “Maroon”, “Trapped”, “Cholai”, “Sadgati”, “Mukti Bhawan”, “Mantra”, “Aakrosh”, “Veeram”, “Ardh Satya” and “Haraamkhor”. (IANS)

Next Story

Facebook to roll out camera effects specifically designed for Indians, boasts 184 million Active Users in the country

0
32
FILE - Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. VOA

New Delhi, April 27, 2017: Considering India to be an important market, Social media giant Facebook is all set to please the users by rolling out effects in its new camera interface, specifically designed for the people in the country.

During an event in Delhi on Wednesday, Facebook has made the announcement and showcased its family products and apps including- Facebook Live, Facebook Lite, Full Camera, 360 Photos, Groups, Events, Oculus, Instagram, WhatsApp.

NewsGram brings to you latest new stories in India.

“Today, we’re also rolling out local camera effects designed for India. In addition to the frames and effects that come standard in the Facebook camera, we’ve designed several custom effects for India – so people can create and share photos and videos that showcase the expression of Namaste as well as capture geo-specific experiences in Delhi, Mumbai, Goa, and other places,” the social networking site said in a press statement.

The social network giant also revealed that over 184 million people are using Facebook in India. “India is a very important country to Facebook, and we’re proud to have more than 184 million monthly active people in India who use Facebook to connect with their friends and family, and to build supportive communities online and offline,” it said.

According to the Business Today report, last month in March, Facebook rolled out its new camera feature – which had drawn comparisons to Snapchat. “Last month, Facebook rolled out its new camera feature. We want to make it fast, fun and easy for people to share creative photos and videos with whomever, they choose, for however long they choose – and the more we share with each other, the more open and connected our community can be,” Facebook said.

Go to NewsGram and check out news related to political current issues.

The company said that there would be new changes in Facebook Lite to improve the experience of Indian users. “Products like Facebook Lite, which makes it easier for people to access Facebook on older Android devices or slower connections, counts India as one of the top countries. We continue to make improvements to these products so people in India can connect,” it said.

“Just this month we’re rolling out Reactions, an extension of the Like button on Facebook Lite. Now, conversations on FB Lite can be enhanced through Reactions including ‘Love”, “Haha’, ‘Wow’, ‘Sad’ and ‘Angry’,” it added.

– prepared by Staff Writer of NewsGram 

Next Story

Actress Rachel McAdams used to Meditate by practicing Medical Stitches on the set of Movie “Doctor Strange”

One of the actress' favourite things about her career is getting a chance to take a glimpse at others' lives and careers in her research for her characters

0
175
Rachel Mcadams, Wikimedia

Los Angeles, Nov 14, 2016: Actress Rachel McAdams liked to meditate on the set of “Doctor Strange” by practicing medical stitches.

“My mum was a nursee and I just don’t posess that gene so I was always fascinated. It’s a job that takes so much guts. I shadowed a really great female neurosurgeon in Toronto and one in London, who taught me how to do stitches. It was very meditative, like knitting,” McAdams, who plays Christine Palmer — a doctor — in the film, told LOOK magazine.

NewsGram brings to you current foreign news from all over the world.

She added: “When I was bored on set, I would just pull out my… stitching wire. I don’t even know what it’s called, some doctor I am. But I would practise and it was great to jump into another world.”

One of the actress’ favourite things about her career is getting a chance to take a glimpse at others’ lives and careers in her research for her characters, reports femalefirst.co.uk.

NewsGram brings to you top news around the world today.

“I think it’s the thing I love most about my job, that you get to live so many lives in one lifetime. I have a bit of ADD (Attention Deficit Disorder) when it comes to things, so variety is the spice of life for me,” she said.

But the actress also enjoyed the “weird” experience of working with so much special effects and computer generated imagery.

“When I read one of the scenes, I was simultaneously daunted and excited because it was like nothing I’d ever seen before. It was fresh and different and weird. It was like choreographing a dance. And Benedict was actually there for a lot of it, up on wires, flying around the room for hours on end,” she said. (IANS)