Nearing the doomsday: Rising sea levels drowning metropolitan cities of the world


New Delhi: According to a report recently published which looks toward the ice sheets of Antarctica, the alarming rise in the sea levels can be responsible for the drowning of major coastal cities.

The study suggests the aftermath can manifest into an increase of a three feat rise in the sea levels by the end of this century. Though it is reported that the low-lying cites as New York and Hong Kong will be at the downside, the authors are most concerned about metropolises like that of Boston, which are vulnerable to face an over five feet extension of the sea levels at the close of the coming century.

The Climate Change Summit, which has held last year in Paris, had the prominent leaders of the world pledging to cut the carbon greenhouse gas emissions and keeping the surge of global warming under the mark of 2 degrees Celsius.

Unfortunately, Pollard and DeConte in their report write that upon the evaluation of the data, it can be said that the final conclusions are overriding the predictions made by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. And apparently, those were considered, till recently as the worst-case scenario affecting our planet.

By 2100, there can be a rise of about two meters upon melting of ice in the poles. Pollard, opines that the probable effects to follow this will be something like the hazardous form of Hurricane Sandy, one which will have the potential to contribute to future flood losses.

Both Pollard and DeCante says that the rise in the sea levels will be accounting to an estimate of nearly 50 meters in Antarctica alone, and all of these will be taking place by 2500. While the latter is of the opinion, as given in an interview, that the global warming will be trapping the coastal cities and the defense mechanisms will be proven to be ineffective then.

Still, the calling of the doomsday can be countered, as stated by DeConte by curtailing the dangerous emissions and keeping the Antarctica, well frozen.

(Inputs from