Monday October 16, 2017

Nearly 35 percent paucity of teachers in 23 IITs: RTI

Gaud stated that currently, IITs stand at 1:16 student-teacher ratio while they are trying to attain 1:10 student teacher ratio

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paucity of teachers
IIT Bombay, Wikimedia

Indore, February 15, 2017: “As against sanctioned strength of 7,744 teachers, 5,072 teachers are teaching 82,603 students in 23 IITs. This means 2,672 posts are lying vacant which is 35 per cent,” Neemuch-based activist Chandrashekhar Gaud told citing a reply from an official in Union HRD ministry. The break up was provided till 1st October, 2016

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An RTI inquiry unveiled that around 35 percent of posts of teachers are remaining vacant in 23 IITs in the entire country.

Gaud stated that currently, IITs stand at 1:16 student-teacher ratio while they are trying to attain 1:10 student teacher ratio.

According to “Super 30” founder, Anand Kumar spoke, “the government opened new IITs in the last couple of years in a haste, but has failed to provide necessary infrastructure like laboratories etc. This is affecting the quality of these IITs, which in long term could affect the brand IIT at a global level.”

According to Gaud, the old IITs too are equally affected by the paucity of teachers.

“In old IITs, 30 per cent posts of teachers are lying vacant at IIT Bombay, Delhi (35%), Guwahati (27%), Kanpur (37%), Kharagpur (46%), Madras (28%), Roorkee (45%) and IIT BHU (47%),” he stated quoting from the HRD reply.

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Only 3935 teachers are working against 6250 posts that accounts 37 per cent lesser than sanctioned strength, in these eight IITs

The paucity of teachers in IIT Bhubaneshwar is 35%, IIT Gandhinagar (11%), IIT Hyderabad (16%), IIT Jodhpur (39%), IIT Patna (20%), IIT Raipur (24%), IIT Tirupati (39%), IIT Palakkad (28%) and IIT Dhanbad (36%).

 

-prepared by Sabhyata Badhwar of NewsGram. Twitter: @SabbyDarkhorse

 

 

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National Book Trust (NBT) Chairman: Nurturing Creativity and Innovation in Children at an Early Age are Much Needed

How should current school curriculum be modified for an overall development of Children?

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Nurturing creativity and innovation in children
Nurturing creativity and innovation in children. Pixabay
  • Education should work in the direction of expanding the horizon of knowledge children
  • There is a need to shift educational learning for school goers from content mastery to competency mastery
  • To compete with the children worldwide, they need to have an understanding that is beyond books

New Delhi, August 21, 2017: There is a need to look beyond the world of text books and inculcate in children qualities like empathy towards society, humanity, sensitivity towards other human beings and nature.

Baldeo Bhai Sharma, Chairman of National Book Trust (NBT), talked about nurturing creativity, innovation in young minds for nation’s economic and spiritual development.

He was speaking at the FICCI’s first-ever Children’s Publishing Conclave called ‘Scrapbook’. Mr. Sharma said that it is crucial to observe and spot the creativity in children. To not just bound them to the school curriculum. The Supplementary books in school should teach them about the life lessons, that they should be good human beings. Such books will help them in the developing a good and positive personality; it will also strengthen their thinking and imaginative skills.

ALSO READ: 11 Facts about Education System Around the World: Do they prove to be Beneficial for Children?

In the conclave, he talked about how brave soldiers can inspire kids to be like that when they grow up and fight for their country someday. If not, even then such books will inculcate a feeling of patriotism in them. According to ANI reports, Mr. Sharma (pointing towards NBT’s efforts) said, “‘The Veergatha’ series had been introduced by NBT, which talks of the great acts of bravery by Indian soldiers.” The first series has a set of 5 books in English and Hindi, they are written so as to inspire the young minds and evoke feelings of patriotism in children from an early age.

Children are sometimes overburdened with books.  UNESCO encourages learning in mother tongue, especially at the early stage.  Sharma said that education should work in the direction of expanding the horizon of knowledge in a child and he agrees with UNESCO that teaching a child in mother tongue should be encouraged to retain cultural values.

Dr. Hrushikesh Senapaty, Director of NCERT, said: “There is a need to shift educational learning for school goers from content mastery to competency mastery, where competencies should be classified into character, intellectual and social.” He stressed upon the need to make the classroom environment vibrant where teachers would play the role of a facilitator- will provide them with an opportunity where they can develop and strengthen their competencies as well as communication ability. He added, “The Indian education system is moving from knowledge construction to knowledge processing with the help of technology, enabling children to explore, innovate and create.”

ALSO READ: Ragas for Preschool Children: Combining Classical Music with Fun Exercises

Appreciating FICCI’s initiative, Dr. Senapaty said that the goal of this publishing conclave is to produce content which is rich in quality and is innovative. It will enable them to learn in a collaborative environment. He added, “Indian children have performed well when they follow a prescribed school curriculum but to compete with the children worldwide, they need to have an understanding that is beyond books and focus on skills like building their applied knowledge.”

Children should explore, innovate and create
Children should explore, innovate and create. Pixabay

Ms. Urvashi Butalia, Chairperson, FICCI Publishing Committee and Director, Zubaan, said that the conclave focused on:

  • promoting book reading amongst young minds
  • government and children’s publishers- enhance learning outcome in educational space
  • policy advocacy- nurture collaboration between schools
  • addressed- gender misrepresentation in children’s books
  • concerns- children’s content in school books
  • implementing theory of multiple intelligence on children’s content- enhance learning outcome
  • changing role of technology in children’s content and its impact on K-12 (kindergarten (K) and the 1st -12th grade) education

Dr. A. Didar Singh, Secretary-General, FICCI, said that this platform will help to explore possible collaboration between children, content creators, offline and online service providers, publishers, technology disruptors, schools, teachers, parents, and policymakers. The conclave focused on the important aspects like learning requirements of an individual child, crucial role publishers can play to address it.

The conclave also had some interesting workshops for school children. The workshops had activities like creative writing, story-telling and received appreciation from the young minds.


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Was Taj Mahal Once a Shiva Temple? The Debate over the Tomb Continues

According to some historians, Taj Mahal was incipiently a Shiva Temple offered to the Mughals as a form of the gift by a Rajput king

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Taj Mahal
Taj Mahal. Wikimedia Commons

New Delhi, August 16, 2017: The famous monument from the Mughal era, Taj Mahal is once more in contention as the Central Information Commission (CIC) has requested the Central government to clear up unequivocally whether it is a tomb or a Shiva Temple. An RTI came to the CIC regarding the same, in response to which the quasi-constitutional body solicited answers from the culture minister.

But where did this question come from and what is the source?

According to some historians, Taj Mahal was incipiently a Shiva Temple offered to the Mughals as a form of the gift by a Rajput king. The hypothesis says that the temple was later formed into the monument that dwells graves of the Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan and his adored wife Mumtaz Mahal, mentioned IndiaNews.

Also Read: Firozabad Glass Industry is Declining: Is Taj Mahal to be Blamed? 

In 2015, a case was recorded in Agra by six lawyers, requesting that the tomb ought to be given over to Hindus for worship. The litigation solicited to forbid Islamic religious actions performed in the monument and remove the graves.

PN Oak, a revisionist historian also made the claim in his 1989  book “Taj Mahal” that the name Taj Mahal was procured from a Sanskrit word “Tejo Mahalay’ meaning a Shiva Temple.

The Cultural Minister Mahesh Sharma denied the claims in response to the question put forward to him that the Seventh wonder of the world was a Shiva Temple.


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Haryana School Teachers won’t be Allowed to Carry Mobiles in Classrooms: Education Department

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School Children, teachers, mobile phones
School Children in India. Pixabay

August 4, 2017: Taking the liberty of staying connected with the world while teaching can prove costly for government school teachers in Haryana. The Education Department on Thursday announced that teachers won’t be allowed to carry mobile phones to classrooms.

Fresh guidelines issued by the Education Department could put teachers and school heads in the dock if they carry or use mobile phones in classrooms.

Outlining the guidelines, an official spokesman said here that “henceforth no teacher shall take mobile phone to the classroom.

“It shall be kept stashed away in the staff room or in an area earmarked by the head of school. The person the head of the school may like to make in charge of custody of cell phones may be head of school room, staff room, clerk or any other employee,” the guideline said.

If for some unavoidable reasons, a mobile phone was required to be taken to the classroom for academic use, prior permission should be taken from the head of school with reasons to be recorded in a register to be maintained for this purpose, the spokesman said.

“To facilitate any emergency communication about teachers, it shall be ensured that the head of school makes available two contact numbers to all teachers. These two phone numbers for emergency call can

be that of head of school, the second senior most in-charge of the school, or clerk or any other arrangement deemed fit by the head of school,” say the guidelines.

The use of mobile phone during non-class hours shall be confined to the area removed from the classes.

The spokesman said any violation would lead to action against the head of school.

The spokesman said the guidelines have been issued following complaints that many teachers take mobile phones to classrooms during teaching hours.

“This amounts to misusing and diverting teaching hours to other purposes which are unproductive and do not in any way contribute to the academic improvement of schools. This has to be checked,” the official said. (IANS)