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New York Bombings Update:Chelsea Bombings suspect Ahmad Khan Rahami arrested

The suspect, Ahmad Khan , a 28-year-old U.S. citizen of Afghan descent weighing in at 5-foot-6 and 200 pounds was arrested

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  • Latest Update:Ahmad Khan arrested in relation to the recent Chelsea bombings
  • New York governor says ‘possible foreign connection’ in Chelsea Bombings
  • Five suspected bombs found in wake of weekend Manhattan bombing

The FBI said that Rahami, 28, was born in Afghanistan and is believed to be living in Elizabeth, New Jersey.

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In a press release from the FBI, Rahami, who is a U.S. citizen, should “be considered armed and dangerous.”

A federal source confirms to the public that Rahami is considered separate from the five people who were detained by the FBI on Sunday night. Those individuals were taken in for questioning during a traffic stop at the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge, the bridge that connects the boroughs of Brooklyn and Staten Island.

The federal official also confirms that the same model flip-style cell phone was used as a detonator for the two bombs in Chelsea (a second device was discovered on Saturday night and disarmed by authorities) and the bomb that went off ahead of a charity run in Seaside Park, New Jersey, which is about 85 miles south of Manhattan.

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Both bombings occurred within hours of each other on Saturday.

No one was injured in the Seaside Park bombing. Although twenty-nine people were injured in the Chelsea bombing but none of the injuries are considered to be life-threatening. (VOA)

 

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  • Antara

    The latest arrest and the recent findings would hopefully help more to proceed in the proper direction with the issue of the bombings!

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U.S. Library of Congress will not collect every tweet on twitter

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FILE - The Twitter app is seen on a mobile phone in Philadelphia, April 26, 2017
U.S. Library of Congress will not collect every tweet on twitter. VOA

US, Dec 31, 2017: The U.S. Library of Congress says it will no longer collect every single tweet published on Twitter as it has been doing for the past 12 years.

The library said this week that it can no longer collect everything across the entire social media platform because of recent changes Twitter has made, including allowing longer tweets, photos and videos.

It said in a blog post this week that its first objective with collecting and archiving tweets was “to document the emergence of online social media for future generations.” The library says it has fulfilled that objective and no longer needs to be a “comprehensive” collector of tweets.

FILE - In this Dec. 19, 2013 file photo, the Library of Congress is seen in Washington.
FILE – In this Dec. 19, 2013 file photo, the Library of Congress is seen in Washington. VOA

The Library of Congress said it will still collect and archive tweets in the future, but will do so on a more selective basis. It said going forward “the tweets collected and archived will be thematic and event-based, including events such as elections, or themes of ongoing national interest, e.g. public policy.”

The library said it generally does not collect media comprehensively, but said it made an exception for public tweets when the social media platform was first developed.

The library said it will keep its previous archive of tweets from 2006-2017 to help people understand the rise of social media and to offer insight into the public mood during that time. “Throughout its history, the Library has seized opportunities to collect snapshots of unique moments in human history and preserve them for future generations,” it said.

“The Twitter Archive may prove to be one of this generation’s most significant legacies to future generations. Future generations will learn much about this rich period in our history, the information flows, and social and political forces that help define the current generation,” it said. (VOA)

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