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Only 20% of graduating engineers in India are employable: Study

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New Delhi: Highlighting the gap that exists between technical education imparted by the colleges and the employability of the students who pass out of them, a new study says that only 20% of the engineering graduates in India are employable.

Every year, thousands of students graduate out of engineering colleges, but it appears that more than 80% of them do not have the necessary skills and talents that would make them employable, says the latest Aspiring Minds National Employability Report.

The report is based on a study conducted in 650 engineering colleges across India involving more than 1,50,000 students who had passed out in 2015.

Varun Aggarwal, the CTO of Aspiring Minds said: “”Engineering has become the de-facto graduate degree for a large chunk of students today. However, along with improving the education standards, it is quintessential that we evolve our undergraduate programs to make them more job centric.”

Among the states, Kerala and Odisha were among the top 25 percentile list of most employable states. Delhi, followed by Bengaluru were among the top cities who generated the highest number of employable engineers, as per the report.

The report also showed that employability among men and women were equal, though employability of women were higher in few sectors like BPO, content developer, sales engineer, etc.

Another interesting aspect revealed by the report was that, contrary to popular belief, even tier-III cities produced a fair share of employable engineers. Thus, the report suggested that these candidates from tier-III companies could possibly fulfill the entry-level needs of many IT service companies. (Photo: www.huffingtonpost.ca)

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    India – ProjectHindi, an online
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    “There
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    talented members of our community,” said Singh. “The learning gap continues to
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    New
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    For
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    e-learning portal, visit: http://www.projecthindi.com/.

  • ProjectHindi: Making India Employable Through Online Free Education

    India – ProjectHindi, an online
    e-learning portal for imparting free education in Hindi, continues to
    revolutionize and equip hard-working Indians with access to important classes
    and courses in their native tongue. Designed to make India more employable
    through an easy to use online platform, ProjectHindi is completely free and
    self-paced, viewable on any electronic device, and backed by responsive
    instructors ready to answer any questions or inquires.

    “My
    passion for disseminating free and accessible education to anyone interested in
    India knows no boundaries,” said Prateek Singh, Creator and Founder of
    ProjectHindi. “ProjectHindi is the first free platform of its nature, solely
    dedicated to providing education and coursework on employability skills in
    demand in India. It’s my goal to close the loophole between vacant jobs, and
    hard-working individuals without the skillsets necessary to excel.”

    Currently,
    courses on Javascript, XML, Microsoft Excel, HTML, CSS, job interviews,
    numerology, and many more are available in Hindi on ProjectHindi. Lessons are
    designed to be learning friendly and are broken down into bit sizes, conducive
    to successful absorption processes. Instructors are readily available to bring
    pupils up to speed on the course progress and answer any questions regarding
    the site.

    “There
    are so many jobs waiting to be filled here in India with the intelligent and
    talented members of our community,” said Singh. “The learning gap continues to
    grow as practical skills relevant today are rarely available in Hindi. Please
    visit my free online school for obtaining these vital attributes in the
    information age, and spread the word to your family and friends.”
    New
    courses and information continue to be updated and added to ProjectHindi every
    week.
    For
    more information, or to get started with the new and resourceful online
    e-learning portal, visit: http://www.projecthindi.com/.

Next Story

Child Rights Summit: Nations Should Spend More on Education Over Weapons

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child rights summit
Displaced Syrian children look out from their tents at Kelbit refugee camp, near the Syrian-Turkish border, in Idlib province, Syria, Jan. 17, 2018. VOA

Countries should spend more on schooling and less on weapons to ensure that children affected by war get an education, a child rights summit heard Monday.

The gathering in Jordan was told that a common thread of war was its devastating impact in keeping children out of school.

Indian Nobel laureate Kailash Satyarthi, who founded the summit, said ensuring all children around the world received a primary and secondary education would cost another $40 billion annually — about a week’s worth of global military expenditure.

ALSO READ: Politics and Education: A Relationship that contributes a lot in shaping our Future

child rights summit
Nobel Peace Prize laureates Kailash Satyarthi and Malala Yousafzai listen to speeches during the Nobel Peace Prize awards ceremony at the City Hall in Oslo, Dec. 10, 2014. VOA

“We have to choose whether we have to produce guns and bullets, or we have to produce books and pencils to our children,” he told the second Laureates and Leaders for Children Summit that gathers world leaders and Nobel laureates.

Global military expenditure reached almost $1.7 trillion in 2016, according to the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute. The United Nations children’s agency UNICEF said last year 27 million children were out of school in conflict zones.

ALSO READ: Exclusive: How is One Woman Army changing the notions of Education in society?

“We want safe schools, we want safe homes, we want safe countries, we want a safe world,” said Satyarthi, who shared the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize with Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai for his work with children.

Jordan’s Prince Ali bin al-Hussein told the summit, which focused on child refugees and migrants affected by war and natural disasters, that education was “key,” especially for “children on the move.”

“Education can be expensive, but never remotely as close to what is being spent on weapons. … They [children] are today’s hope for a better future,” he told the two-day summit.

Kerry Kennedy, president of Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights, a nonprofit group, described the number of Syrian refugees not in school in the Middle East as “shocking” as the war enters its eighth year.

Kennedy cited a report being released Tuesday by the KidsRights Foundation, an international children’s rights group, which found 40 percent of school-aged Syrian children living in Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan, Egypt, and Iraq cannot access education. VOA