Monday April 23, 2018
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Owing to heavy rains, swollen Ganga Floods low lying areas in Varanasi

The low lying areas of Alaipur, Chaukaghat, Nakkhighat and Sarainya have been flooded by the Varuna river

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(Representational Image) Varanasi Flood 2013. Image Source: YouTube.com
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  • The Ganga has risen by about seven metres in Varanasi district in Uttar Pradesh
  • The river had submerged some temples along the ghats here but was still flowing three metres below the danger mark
  •  Due to inundation on the Dashwasmedh Ghat, temporary arrangements have been made on the roof top of the Ganga Seva Nidhi office for Ganga Aarti, a daily routine

Owing to heavy rains the Ganga has risen by about seven metres in Varanasi district in Uttar Pradesh, while one of its tributaries has inundated some areas here, officials said on Monday.
The low lying areas of Alaipur, Chaukaghat, Nakkhighat and Sarainya have been flooded by the Varuna river, which originates near Bhadohi and joins the Ganga in Varanasi, the officials said.

 

The Ganga had submerged some temples along the ghats here but was still flowing three metres below the danger mark. The administration has taken flood prevention measures and urged people living near the banks of the Ganga to move to safer places.

Flooded low lying areas in Varanasi. Image Source: economictimes.indiatimes.com
Flooded low lying areas in Varanasi. Image Source: economictimes.indiatimes.com

The Manikarnika Ghat, used for cremations, is on the verge of being swallowed up by the Ganga, a resident told IANS.

Due to inundation on the Dashwasmedh Ghat, temporary arrangements have been made on the roof top of the Ganga Seva Nidhi office for Ganga Aarti, a daily routine.

Ensuring necessary safety measures,the administration has banned the small boats and steamers on the Ganga. (IANS )

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  • AJ Krish

    Evacuations should take place before the water reaches the danger mark. Warnings should be issued and the disaster management team must be kept on standby.

  • Aparna Gupta

    This more than normal rainfall will prove not only an advantage but also a disadvantage too. It will increase the flood risks in the country just like in Varanasi.

  • AJ Krish

    Evacuations should take place before the water reaches the danger mark. Warnings should be issued and the disaster management team must be kept on standby.

  • Aparna Gupta

    This more than normal rainfall will prove not only an advantage but also a disadvantage too. It will increase the flood risks in the country just like in Varanasi.

Next Story

Greenland Is Melting

If all the ice covering the world’s largest island were to thaw, sea levels would rise roughly 6 meters

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FILE - An iceberg is seen melting off the coast of Ammasalik, Greenland, July 19, 2007. VOA
  • Greenland is slowly melting
  • This melting adds roughly 1 millimetre of water per year to global sea levels
  • This can mean huge floods in coming years

Like a bowling ball on a skating rink, the black geodesic sphere of the East Greenland Ice-Core Project’s communal living space stands out against the endless white nothingness of the Greenland ice sheet.

 

Iceberg melting can cause huge floods in coming years.
Iceberg melting can cause huge floods in coming years.

But the real action at East GRIP is under the surface. Researchers are drilling through more than 2.5 kilometres of ice, down to the bedrock below. The ice is sliding fast — for a glacier — toward the sea. Scientists here want to know why. The answer may hold clues to the future of the world’s coastal cities.

Greenland is melting. As it melts, it adds roughly 1 millimetre of water per year to global sea levels. And the pace of melting is quickening.

If all the ice covering the world’s largest island were to thaw, sea levels would rise roughly 6 meters. Scientists don’t know how fast, or how likely, that is to happen. East GRIP is looking for evidence to inform both those questions.

The answers are a matter of growing urgency. The seas are rising faster. And the same processes at work on Greenland’s glaciers at the top of the world could send vast sections of Antarctica’s ice sheet into the sea as well, raising ocean levels even further.

Melting of icebergs is increasing sea levels every year. VOA
Melting of icebergs is increasing sea levels every year. VOA

Also Read: Earth was like Mars? Experts find fossils in Greenland dating back to 3.7 Billion Years

The Arctic is warming twice as fast as the rest of the planet. Scientists studying the rapid changes gather in the small Greenland town of Kangerlussuaq, a former U.S. military base built during World War II. Through the Cold War, this outpost supplied remote radar sites watching a nuclear attack coming over the pole.

These days, military transport planes fly scientists and their equipment across 1,000 kilometres of Arctic ice to East GRIP. They make research possible here and at other far-flung scientific outposts on the vast Greenland ice sheet.

Departing from Kangerlussuaq, VOA visited East GRIP and other remote corners of Greenland with the 109th Airlift Wing of the U.S. Air National Guard for a firsthand look at science in action at the leading edge of climate change. VOA