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Painting of First Indian Oscar winner to be auctioned at Saffronart sale in Mumbai

The modern Indian art sale also features significant works by stalwarts like Tyeb Mehta, Ram Kumar, M F Husain, and Akbar Padamsee among others

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Paintings at Saffronart (representational image, credits-Google)

Wed, 8 Feb 2017: A rare painting of Bhanu Athaiya, the first Indian to win the Oscar in 1983 for costume design in Richard Attenborough’s film “Gandhi”, will go under the hammer at Saffronart’s evening sale on February 16.

The painting by modernist artist Vasudeo S Gaitonde that immortalises Athaiya, Gaitonde’s student at the J J School of Art, was later acquired by fellow modernist Krishen Khanna and is estimated at Rs 23 crore.The modern Indian art sale also features significant works by stalwarts like Tyeb Mehta, Ram Kumar, M F Husain, and Akbar Padamsee among others, PTI reported

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“We are proud to present an extraordinary and carefully curated collection of modern masterpieces. It features leading names including V S Gaitonde, Tyeb Mehta, Ram Kumar, M F Husain and F N Souza. Gaitonde’s painting of Bhanu is a rare and significant work,” Hugo Weihe, CEO of Saffronart said while talking to PTI.

The ‘Falling Figure’ (1965), one of Mehta’s earliest works, that won him a gold medal in the First Triennale of Contemporary World Art is estimated at Rs 57 crore.

The painting was an outcome of the artist witnessing the death of a man falling through a window during the Partition riots in 1947.

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“Mehta’s pared down minimalism, light colour and vigorous brushwork create an unlikely juxtaposition with the trauma that is the subject of his work. Mehta’s ‘Falling Figure’ is one of the earliest versions of his seminal series,” Weihe said.

A diptych by Padamsee is being offered at Rs 35 crore.

A continuation of the artist’s ‘Mirror Image’ series which are imagined landscapes, it offers a glimpse into his meditations on time, space and the duality of perception and reality through form, colour and texture.

Ram Kumar’s 1961 landscape ‘Benaras’, is an important early work of a subject that became the artist’s major preoccupation for the next several decades, marking a transition from his earlier figurative works.

The painting is estimated at Rs 65-85 lakhs.

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An unusual portrait showcasing a stoic Kumar painted by Husain in Kumar’s early figurative style, that is estimated between Rs 50-70 lakhs is also part of the sale. The artwork highlights the camaraderie between the two artists.

“Husain made the painting to honour Kumar, when the latter was unable to attend a joint exhibition of the two artists in Prague in 1967,” Weihe said.

The auction will be held in Mumbai.

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Mahalaya: Beginning of “Devipaksha” in Bengali Celebration of ‘Durga Puja’

“Mahalaya” is the auspicious occasion that marks the beginning of “Devipaksha” and the ending of “Pitripaksha” and heralds the celebration of Durga Puja

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Mahalaya morning in Kolkata. Flickr
  • Mahalaya 2017 Date: 19th september.
  • On Mahalaya, people throng to the holy river Ganges in order to pay homage to their ancestors and forefathers; which is called ‘Torpon’
  • Mahalaya remains incomplete without the magical chanting of the scriptural verses from the ‘Chandi Kavya’ that is broadcasted in All India Radio
  • The magic is induced by the popular Birendra Krishna Bhadra whose voice makes the recitation of the “Chandi Kavya” even more magnificent

Sept 19, 2017: Autumn is the season of the year that sees the Hindus, all geared up to celebrate some of the biggest festivals of India. The festive spirit in the Bengalis all enthused to prepare for the greatest of the festivals, the ‘Durga Puja’.

About Mahalaya:

Mahalaya is the auspicious occasion that marks the beginning of “Devipaksha” and the ending of “Pitripaksha,” and this year it is celebrated on September 19.

Observed exactly a week before the ‘Durga Puja’, Mahalaya is the harbinger of the arrival of Goddess Durga. It is celebrated to invoke the goddess possessing supreme power! The goddess is invited to descend on earth and she is welcomed with devotional songs and holy chants of mantras. On this day, the eye is drawn in the idols of the Goddess by the artisans marking the initiation of “Devipaksha”. Mahalaya arrives and the countdown to the Durga Puja begins!

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The day of Mahalaya bears supreme significance to the Bengalis. The day is immensely important because on this day people throng to the holy river Ganges in order to pay homage to their ancestors and forefathers. Clad in white dhotis, people offer prayers and take dips in the river while praying for their demised dear ones. The ritual is popular as “Torpon”.

Mahalaya
An idol-maker in progress of drawing the eye in the idol of the Goddess. Wikipedia

As per Hindu myth, on “Devipaksha”, the Gods and the Goddesses began their preparations to celebrate “Mahamaya” or Goddess Durga, who was brought upon by the trinity- Brahma, Vishnu, and Maheshwara; to annihilate the fierce demon king named Mahishasura. The captivating story of the Goddess defeating the demon got popularized with the goddess being revered as “Durgatinashini” or the one who banishes all the evils and miseries of the world. The victory of the Goddess is celebrated as ‘Durga Puja’.

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Mahalaya remains incomplete without the magical chanting of the scriptural verses from the ‘Chandi Kavya’ that is broadcasted at dawn in All India Radio in the form of a marvelous audio montage enthralling the souls of the Bengalis. Presented with wonderful devotional music, acoustic drama, and classical songs- the program is also translated to Hindi and played for the whole pan-Indian listeners.

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Mahalaya
Birendra Krishna Bhadra (1905-1991). Wikipedia

The program is inseparable from Mahalaya and has been going on for over six decades till date. The magic is induced by the popular Birendra Krishna Bhadra whose voice makes the recitation of the “Chandi Kavya” even more magnificent! He has been a legend and the dawn of Mahalaya turns insipid without the reverberating and enchanting voice of the legendary man.

Mahalaya will keep spreading the magic and setting the vigor of the greatest festival of the Bengalis- the Durga Puja, to worship the supreme Goddess, eternally.

                 “Yaa Devi Sarbabhuteshu, Shakti Rupena Sanhsthita,

                     Namastaswai Namastaswai Namastaswai Namo Namaha.”

– by Antara Kumar of NewsGram. Twitter: @ElaanaC

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You can Perfect your Boho-chic Outfit with Vintage pieces from your Mother’s Closet

Designer Divya Arora at Roop Vatika and designer Anuradha Ramam have shared a few inputs on how to carry a perfect boho look:

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Attain the boho chic style with vintage pieces
Boho-chic Outfit with Vintage pieces from your Mother's Closet.. Pixabay
  • Experts suggest ways to get boho look with the pieces from your mother’s closet
  • Say NO to neon to get the boho look right
  • Vintage belts are a saviour to all your plus size outfits

New Delhi, August 18, 2017: Hunt for vintage pieces like flare pants, floral shirts or skirts in your mother’s closet to get the boho look right, say experts.
Designer Divya Arora at Roop Vatika and designer Anuradha Ramam have shared a few inputs on how to carry a perfect boho look:

* Avoid neon as much as you can. Bright colours always attract more heat and light to your boho-chic outfit.
* Don’t forget fringe bag and batik tote.
* Instead of wearing a scarf on your body, wrap it around your waist or head. It is a perfect way to add some dazzling style to your look and can even cover up a bad hair day.
* Wearing a floppy and tanned hat can not only protect you from the sun, but also be a bohemian chic accessory.
* Look into what your mother and grandmother’s closets hold for you, something which didn’t attract you a while ago might solve the purpose now. For instance, unique vintage pieces such as flare pants, floral shirts or skirts, halter tops or swing skirts are the basics of boho-chic look.
* Interestingly, the shawl/dupatta reserved for special occasions could be a great addition to your outfit. Look for beautiful ethnic prints and patterns such as ikat and accentuate your regular outfit with a touch of ethnicity. Layer the shawl on your shoulders, you could either knot it in the front or not.
* Make your tank top and bottoms more interesting by adding a colourful kimono or colours as basic as white and pastel to your basic outfit or dress. Pair up your kimono with a romper for the casual look.

Also read: Eco-friendly Fashion: Should India Contribute on this Booming Global Market?

* Even if you go with your favourite slim fit denims or with your summer dress, try layering it with a loose and long kimono, shrug, a printed jacket or a scarf to make it more appealing. Add the touch of femininity by layering loose layers over fitted outfit, the key here to balance the outfit.
* Vintage belts are the saviour to every plus size outfit or any flared dress or ankle length casual dresses.
* Bandanas can make the band skinny or wide, depending on your preference and can be tied around your neck or on your head. Pair your white boho blouse with a dungaree to make it extra comfy with an oversized boho bag.
* Embroidery is timeless. Known for the elegance, embroidery can make your outfit really come to life. (IANS)

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Exclusive: “Memesis” Depicts my Inner Feelings during the time of Pregnancy : Artist Rajni Sahni

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Rajni with her Paper Pulp Cast work made in 2003. NewsGram

– by Tusheeta Kaushik

July 31, 2017: Curated by Jitendra Padam Jain, an exhibition titled “Memesis” was a solo show of Prints and Painting by artist Rajni Sahni and was conducted at Shridharani Art Gallery at Triveni Kala Sangam from July 11th- 21st in New Delhi. “Memesis”, she says, is a representation of herself and the visual perceptions she had in her mind during the time of pregnancy.

Reporter Tusheeta Kaushik of NewsGram spoke to Rajni Sahni on how different forms of visual arts helped her in expressing her mind s visual perceptions in reality, on how art is such a potent form of creative expression which helps in soothing her mind whenever she s going through different emotions and phases in life and on how her mother found the spark and talent in her when she was a little girl.

Tusheeta: When did you realize your passion for art? When was the first time you expressed yourself through art?

Rajni: I realized my passion for art when I passed my diploma in painting from South Delhi Polytechnic College. There, an art critic appreciated it and then there was no turning back after Santiniketan. I started expressing myself through art when I found an artist in myself and that was during my Santiniketan days.

Tusheeta: Anyone or anything that inspired you to take this art form?

Rajni: As a little girl, I was inspired by my mother since she used to appreciate my work and pushed me to never stop myself from expressing through drawings and sketches. Later, as a student at South Delhi Polytechnic College for Women, Professor Jain Gajera inspired me through his works and teachings.

“Metamorphosis” | Etching on paper | 2011

Tusheeta: How did painting help you or relax you at the time of conceiving?

Rajni: Painting had a huge calming effect on me during my 9-month pregnancy! I had some critical conditions. I was there in a room for 6 months and had difficulty in moving from the bed. So, it was my husband who insisted me a lot on unleashing my pain and emotions through art. I agreed and the depiction of my imagination through the usage of different colours made me calm and composed. That s when I thought of starting a series named “Memesis” which depicts my inner feelings during the time of pregnancy. Etching, Painting, Print Making, Lithography, Paper Pulp Casting and Sculpture making are different forms of visual arts that I have worked on.   

“Saviour” | Etching on Paper | 2012

Tusheeta: You’ve mentioned about the magical relation with your daughter. How and why is it so unique and special to you?

Rajni: (Laughing) My daughter is a big critic of my art work. Her appreciation, criticism, guidance and support matters to me. She herself is great at craft making. She s in class 6th and I m glad that I m close to her and the fact that she likes sharing about her daily routine with me.

“Untitled”| Paper Pulp| 2002

 

“I ll weave my life myself ” | Viscosity on Paper | 2011

Tusheeta: You’ve talked about the complex, yet compassionate and a lovable relationship between a mother and her daughter. How this powerful relationship is depicted in your work?

Rajni: I have made a few art works showcasing my relationship with my daughter. I also have had a powerful relationship with my mother, she s been my pillar and I love my daughter immensely, that s the reason I love to showcase the beauty of a mother and daughter relationship through my art work.

Woman from the lap of woman | Paper pulp and thread on paper| 2002

 

“In the lap of nature”| Etching on Paper | 2011

Tusheeta: So, when do you usually paint and what kind of impact does painting have on you?

Rajni: See, it s not just about me as an artist. Any artist out there doesn’t t really have a regular time schedule for painting. Whenever I feel like painting, I paint. I might work on my art piece for a week then I might work on some other piece after a month. It all depends on my mood and whenever I feel like expressing something. I love painting, it has made me what I m today.

 

– reported by Tusheeta Kaushik of NewsGram. Twitter  @TusheetaKaushik