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‘Pink’ spreads a Social Message, Amitabh’s Presence Elevates the Cause in the Film

Youth centric contemporary courtroom drama 'Pink'brims with social message of women safety and floors the audience with strong performances from Amitabh and the other casts

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Pink Movie. Wikipedia
  • Amitabh Bachchan as Deepak Sehgall, the aged defence lawyer, shines as always, in a restrained, but powerful performance
  • What follows is an intriguing courtroom drama where ace lawyer Deepak Sehgall represents them in a bid to get them justice
  • Pink” is an evocative film about women, brimming with messages relevant for society, and keeps you riveted to the screen

New Delhi, Sept 15, 2016: “Pink” is a contemporary youth-centric film with a strong socially relevant message about the choices young women of today make and about respecting those.

Narrated in a linear manner, the simplistically presented film, essentially a courtroom drama, is powerful, owing to its missive, dialogues and performances.

Three young working women, Minal (Tapasee Pannu), Falak (Kirti Kulhari) and Andrea (Andrea Tairang) are flatmates in Delhi and good friends. An untoward incident one night at a resort in Surajkund, involving some boys, among whom is Rajveer (Angad Bedi), who comes from a politically well-connected family, proves to be life changing for the trio.

What follows is an intriguing courtroom drama where ace lawyer Deepak Sehgall represents them in a bid to get them justice.

Replete with contemporary instances and issues, centring around women and their safety, the film, through its potent dialogues, takes a dig at society and its stereotypical norms and prejudices towards women, as in “The Rule Book of the Girls’ Safety Manual”, enumerated by lawyer Deepak Sehgall.

Director Aniruddha Roy Chowdhury extracts natural performances from all his actors, and makes a meaningful film devoid of any unnecessary commercial trappings, never once deviating from the core theme.

Amitabh Bachchan as Deepak Sehgall, the aged defence lawyer, shines as always, in a restrained, but powerful performance. His histrionics come primarily in the form of his well-modulated baritone, conveying his emotions and of course, from the well-written lines.

Taapasee Pannu, as the protagonist Minal Arora plays the brave, present-day Delhi girl with convivial ease. She delivers a power-packed performance, naturally, slipping into her character bringing out the contrast as a strong yet vulnerable girl. Her anxiety, frustrations and angst, against society and the system and its hypocrisy, are all palpable.

Kirti Kulhari as Falak Ali, is equally a powerhouse as a performer. She renders her character of a modern working girl annoyed with the double standards of society, in a convincing manner. The scene in the courtroom, where she breaks down, in particularly laudable.

Andrea Tairang, playing the girl from the northeast is natural, and lives her character with sincerity.

Piyush Mishra as Prashant, the prosecution lawyer, is brilliant, as he succeeds in the audience despising him for his scathing remarks against women and the societal norms they must conform to.

Angad Bedi as Rajveer, the spoilt rich son of a politician, makes the most of his limited screen time. He is intense, becomes the character he is essaying and delivers a credible performance.

The rest of the cast too, comprising the kind-hearted landlord, the lady police officer, the three friends of Rajveer, support the main actors with their strong performances.

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The strength of the film, apart from its great performances, are its taut screenplay and dialogues. Flavoured with a language that the youth of today will relate to, the dialogues are hard-hitting and strike a chord immediately, as they are packed with relevant messages. Humour comes in the form of the satirical dialogues, and lightens the tenor of the otherwise intense film.

With moderate production values, Cinematographer Abhik Mukhopadhay’s lens captures the drama in a realistic manner.

The only song in the film, “Kaari kaari raina”, is used effectively to encapsulate the mood and messages in the film.

Overall, “Pink” is an evocative film about women, brimming with messages relevant for society, and keeps you riveted to the screen. (IANS)

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Asia Cup : India Emerge Champions for third time, Beat Malaysia in Asia Cup Hockey Championship

India emerged victorious for the third time

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(representational Image) India vs Malaysia Hockey Match wikimedia

Dhaka, October 22, 2017 : India overcame Malaysia 2-1 in the final on Sunday to win the Asia Cup hockey championship for the third time.

Ramandeep Singh (3rd minute) and Lalit Upadhyay (29th) scored for India. Shahril Saabah (50th minute) scored the reducer for Malaysia. (IANS)

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India Demands Data on UN Staff Misconduct, Use of Immunity

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India has demanded the secretariat disclose information about misconduct by UN staff. Flickr

United Nations, Oct 7: In an attempt to break the wall of silence around the crimes and UN staff misconduct and those on its assignments, India has demanded the secretariat disclose information about such cases and the immunity invoked against prosecutions.

Yedla Umasankar, the legal advisor in India’s UN Mission, touched a raw nerve here by criticising the UN on Friday for not vigorously following up allegations of serious wrongdoing by its employees who enjoy the equivalent of diplomatic immunity, a prized possession of its staff.

“It appears that the UN system itself may be reluctant to waive immunity even for serious misconduct carried out by its personnel while serving on its missions, so that such cases can be prosecuted by the host governments,” he told the General Assembly’s committee on legal affairs.

“Even a few of such instances or allegations of crimes committed by UN personnel is highly damaging for the image and credibility of the United Nations system and its work around the world,” he added.

His statement also touched on the practice of some countries that protect their wrongdoers at the UN.

Umasankar demanded that secretariat disclose how many cases of serious misconduct by UN personnel were registered and the number of cases where the UN refused to waive immunity to allow their prosecution.

He also wanted to know in how many cases the host country wanted the immunity waived so it can prosecute those accused; the number of times the UN asked the host country or the country that sent them to prosecute them; how many times it consulted countries before waiver of the immunity of their personnel and how many of them refused UN’s request to waive their citizens’ immunity.

The information he wanted does not cover the diplomats sent by member countries to represent them at UN bodies and enjoy diplomatic immunity with the nations hosting the UN facilities.

After scores of serious allegations of sexual misconduct by peacekeepers, especially exploitation of children, the UN vowed to uphold a policy of zero tolerance and began publishing data on such cases in peacekeeping operations including how they were dealt with.

Starting with the year 2015, it began identifying the nationalities of those accused.

However, it has not made public a roster detailing all the allegations and proven cases of serious misconduct across the entire UN.

While the focus has been on sexual exploitation and abuse reported on peacekeeping operations, Umasankar said that “at a broader level, the issue of accountability has remained elusive in some cases”.

He attributed it to “the complexities of legal aspects relating to sovereignty and jurisdiction”, the immunity or privileges that may be necessary for UN operations, and the capability or willingness of countries to investigate and prosecute the accused.

He noted that the UN itself cannot make criminal prosecutions.

While Indian laws has provisions for dealing with crimes committed abroad by its citizens, not all countries have them, he said.

Those countries should be encouraged and helped to implement such measures, he added. (IANS)

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Indo-Pak Peace Talks Futile Unless Islamabad Sheds Links with Terrorism, says Study

A Study by a U.S. think tank calls India and Pakistan talks futile, until Pakistan changes its approach.

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India and Pakistan. Wikimedia.

A Top United States of America (U.S.) think tank, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace called the relations between India and Pakistan futile, unless Islamabad changes its approach and sheds its links with Jihadi terrorism.

A report “Are India and Pakistan Peace Talks Worth a Damn”, authored by Ashley J Tellis stated that such a move supported by foreign countries would be counterproductive and misguided.

The report suggests that International community’s call for the India and Pakistan talks don’t recognize that the tension between the two countries is not actually due to the sharp differences between them, but due to the long rooted ideological, territorial and power-political hatred. The report states that these antagonisms are fueled by Pakistani army’s desire to subvert India’s powerful global position.

Tellis writes that Pakistan’s hatred is driven by its aim to be considered and treated equal to India, despite the vast differences in their achievements and capabilities.

Also ReadMilitant Groups in Pakistan Emerge as Political Parties : Can Violent Extremism and Politics Co-exist? 

New Delhi, however, has kept their stance clear and mentioned that India and Pakistan talks cannot be conducted, until, the latter stops supporting terrorism, and the people conducting destructive activities in India.

The report further suggests that Pakistan sees India as a genuine threat and continuously uses Jihadi terrorism as a source to weaken India. The report extends its support to India’s position and asks other international powers, including the U.S., to extend their support to New Delhi.

Earlier in September, Union External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj in the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) slammed Pakistan for its continuous terror activities. She attacked the country by saying that India has produced engineers, doctors, and scholars; Pakistan has produced terrorists.

Sushma Swaraj further said that when India is being recognised in the world for its IT and achievements in the space, Pakistan is producing Terrorist Organisations like Lashkar-e-Taiba. She said that Pakistan is the world’s greatest exporter of havoc, death and inhumanity.

-by Megha Acharya  of NewsGram. Megha can be reached at @ImMeghaacharya.