Monday April 23, 2018

Practo joins hands with Uber to bring more relief to patients

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Hyderabad: Practo, Asia’s largest healthcare booking platform, and Uber, the world’s leading ride-hailing technology platform, have announced today a global partnership that will make it easier and quicker for consumers to reach doctors.

Starting Monday, Practo users across India, Indonesia, Philippines and Singapore who book an appointment on Practo’s app will be able to see the closest Uber available when they get a reminder alert for their appointments, said a statement.

Users can then click the reminder notification and complete the booking process.

New users who book their first appointment on the Practo app can avail two free rides, up to Rs.200 per ride, with Uber. This offer is valid till December 31.

The partnership also comes with an inaugural offer specific to India, where any existing or new user booking an appointment on Practo till November 30 gets a free ride to and from the doctor’s clinic.

We realised that transportation issues often bring additional stress to a doctor’s visit — having to drive through traffic, then hunt for parking — all while you or your loved one is sitting in the car feeling ill is a terrible experience.

 

“There are also many patients who may not be able to drive themselves to a doctor at all. Our goal with this partnership is to completely remove this anxiety by integrating with Uber’s incredible experience and bringing that to our consumers,” said Practo founder and CEO N.D. Shashank.

Uber India president Amit Jain said: “The technology integration through this partnership reflects our common commitment to create seamless experience for all our user.”

(Inputs from IANS)

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Depression Can Negatively Impact Heart Patients

In another study, the team found that heart attack patients diagnosed with depression were 54 percent more likely to be hospitalised

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Over 5 crore people in India are known to suffer depressive disorders Pixabay
Over 5 crore people in India are known to suffer depressive disorders Pixabay

Depression, even when undiagnosed, can have many negative effects on patients with cardiovascular diseases, including poor healthcare experiences and higher health costs, say researchers.

The study found that people at high risk of depression were more than five times more likely to have a poor self-perceived health status and almost four times more likely to be dissatisfied with their healthcare.

The intake of probiotics may prevent depression
Heart diseases can be worsened by Depression. Wikimedia Commons

Patients at high risk of depression had notably worse healthcare-related quality of life. They spent more on overall and out-of-pocket healthcare expenditures yearly.

They were more than two times more likely to be hospitalised and have an increased use of the emergency room, said the researchers while presenting the results at the American Heart Association’s Quality of Care and Outcomes Research Scientific Sessions 2018 in Virginia.

Also Read: Knee pain can trigger depression in elderly

“This could be because people at high risk for depression simply haven’t been diagnosed and treated for depression yet,” said Victor Okunrintemi, a research student at Baptist Health South Florida, a US-based non-profit.

In another study, the team found that heart attack patients diagnosed with depression were 54 per cent more likely to be hospitalised and 43 per cent more likely to have emergency room visits, compared to those not diagnosed with depression.

depression
Depression can be worsen. Wikimedia Commons

“Depression and heart attack often coexist, which has been associated with worse health experiences for these patients,” Okunrintemi said. About one-fifth of cardiovascular disease patients suffer from depression. “While we don’t know which comes first — depression or cardiovascular disease — the consensus is that depression is a risk marker for cardiovascular disease,” Okunrintemi said.

It means that “if you have cardiovascular disease, there is a higher likelihood that you could also have depression, when compared with the risk in the general population”, he added. IANS

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