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Pregnant Women will be given Financial Aid of Rs 6,000 as part of efforts to bring down Maternal Mortality Rate: PM Narendra Modi

Currently the scheme is being implemented on a pilot basis in 53 districts with the benefit amount being Rs 4,000

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An Indian woman with her little child. Pixabay
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New Delhi, Dec 31, 2016: Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Saturday announced a scheme to provide pregnant women financial aid of Rs 6,000 as part of efforts to bring down the maternal mortality rate.

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“The scheme will be applicable across the over 650 districts of the country. Under this scheme a pregnant woman will be provided with Rs 6,000 for covering hospital admission, vaccination and nutritional food,” said Modi in his special address to the nation on New Year’s Eve.

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“The money will be directly transferred to pregnant women bank accounts,” he said, adding that it “will greatly help in bringing down maternal mortality rate”.

Currently the scheme is being implemented on a pilot basis in 53 districts with the benefit amount being Rs 4,000. (IANS)

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Radiations from gadgets may increase the risk of miscarriage: study

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A study shows that radiations from gadgets may increase the risk of miscarriage.
A study shows that radiations from gadgets may increase the risk of miscarriage. IANS

New York, Dec 14, 2017: Pregnant women’s exposure to non-ionising radiation from smartphones, Bluetooth devices and laptops may double the risk of miscarriage, a study has showed.

Non-ionising radiation — radiation that produces enough energy to move around atoms in a molecule, but not enough to remove electrons completely — from magnetic fields is produced when electric devices are in use and electricity is flowing.

It can be generated by a number of environmental sources, including electric appliances, power lines and transformers, wireless devices and wireless networks.

While the health hazards from ionising radiation are well-established and include radiation sickness, cancer and genetic damage, the evidence of health risks to humans from non-ionising radiation remains limited, said De-Kun Li, a reproductive and perinatal epidemiologist at the Kaiser Permanente — a US-based health care firm.

For the study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, the team asked for 913 pregnant women over age 18 to wear a small (a bit larger than a deck of cards) magnetic-field monitoring device for 24 hours.

After controlling for multiple other factors, women who were exposed to higher magnetic fields levels had 2.72 times the risk of miscarriage than those with lower magnetic fields exposure.

The increased risk of miscarriage associated with high magnetic fields was consistently observed regardless of the sources of high magnetic fields. The association was much stronger if magnetic fields was measured on a typical day of participants’ pregnancies.

The finding also demonstrated that accurate measurement of magnetic field exposure is vital for examining magnetic field health effects.

“This study provides evidence from a human population that magnetic field non-ionising radiation could have adverse biological impacts on human health,” Li noted.

“We hope that the finding from this study will stimulate much-needed additional studies into the potential environmental hazards to human health, including the health of pregnant women,” he said. (IANS)