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Rajasthan facing a deep financial crisis: Sachin Pilot

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Jaipur: The Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) government in Rajasthan was facing a debt crisis because of its financial mismanagement and its functioning had led to severe stress on the agrarian sector, a senior functionary of the opposition Congress said.

“You (Vasundhara Raje government) spent two years criticising the previous Congress government, but this time there is financial mismanagement. There is absolutely no roadmap of getting the agrarian economy back on track,” Sachin Pilot, state president of the Congress, told IANS in an interview here.

“You are also shutting down social welfare schemes of the previous government, privatising everything and putting up a facade of ‘Resurgent Rajasthan’, where you claim lakhs of crores of investments coming into the state,” Pilot, 37, who completed two years as state Congress president on Thursday, claimed.

“Today, the state government is on the brink of a financial breakdown. It is having to extend overdraft limits to pay government salaries. The irony is that the BJP claims that it has lifted Rajasthan out of BIMARU state category. If that is the case, then why is the government coffers empty?” he asks rhetorically.

BIMARU is the epithet used in the past to denote economically weak states like Bihar, Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan and (erstwhile) Uttar Pradesh.

Pilot also said the BJP-alliance ruled central government was giving “stepmotherly treatment” to Rajasthan.

He said that the state government is not getting money for farmers’ relief while Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra and Gujarat had, adding that Rajasthan was suffering because of differences between the Chief Minister Vasundhara Raje and Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

The BJP government’s performance, he contended, could be gauged from declining vote share in every successive elections. “The BJP polled 56 percent in the Lok Sabha elections and in local body elections now their vote share is 47 percent. Congress polled 30 percent share in Lok Sabha polls and our vote share in local body election was 45 percent. So the vote share difference is hardly anything now,” he said.

He said there was a feedback across the state that the ruling BJP “has lost credibility and lost faith of the people.”

Pilot said he had toured over 1.30 lakh kilometres in the state in the last two years with an aim to boost morale of the party workers which was shaken after the party suffered one of its worst defeats in both the assembly and Lok Sabha polls.

“It is often said that those who sweat in peace time don’t bleed in war. I don’t think we should wait for elections to get the party machinery geared up. You have to travel. You have to interact, talk and connect to people. I like small meetings to reach out to people when there is no election. Election campaigns are different,” Pilot said.

The Rajasthan Congress chief said his two years on the post had been a challenging time but also rewarding to some extent.

“When I began, we were trying to come back from the most severe defeat the Congress had ever faced in an assembly election. We hardly had 21 MLAs out of 200 in the state. To come out of that shadow took some time and lot of hard work.”

The Congress now has 24 MLAs in 200-member assembly after wins in by-polls.

He rubbished reports of factionalism within the party, saying he had been quite “fortunate and lucky” to get support and guidance from the senior leaders in the party.

“We work for a commonality of objective which is that Mrs (Sonia) Gandhi and Rahulji want us to be in a position to serve the people of Rajasthan in 2018. I don’t think we could have been this strong in less than two years had it not been for their support and collective effort of everybody in Rajasthan,” Pilot said.

“People judge a party by its performance – whether in the government or opposition. Our performance in the opposition has been quite remarkable. We have been able to win the peoples’ heart and mind”, claimed Pilot. (IANS)

(Anil Sharma can be contacted at anil.s@ians.in)

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15 Amazing facts about Indian National Song: Vande Mataram

The National song of India, Vande Mataram is considered as the foundation of encouragement to the people in their struggle for freedom.

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Bankim Chandra Chattopadhyay wrote the lyrics of Vande Mataram. Wikimedia Commons
Bankim Chandra Chattopadhyay wrote the lyrics of Vande Mataram. Wikimedia Commons
  • Vande Mataram was originally written in 1876 and appeared in Anandamath in 1881
  • Well before the Congress’ Varanasi session on September 7, 1905, Vande Mataram was adopted as the `National Song’ and won India’s heart as its war cry of freedom
  • Poet Sarala Devi Chaudurani sang the national song in the Benares Congress Session in 1905

‘Vande Mataram’, is no less than an epic for our country and holds a special place in the heart of every Indian. The first two words of the title itself are sufficient to induce a great feeling of patriotism.

It would be a surprise for many to know that September 7, 2006, was not the centenary of Vande Mataram. On the contrary, Bankim Chandra Chattopadhyay wrote the lyrics of Vande Mataram well before he penned Anandamath, his novel, which described unified Bengal’s sanyasi uprising against tyrannical Muslim rule in the 1770s.

For better clarification, Vande Mataram was originally written in 1876 and appeared in Anandamath in 1881.

The National song was a part of Bankim Chandra Chatterji’s most famous novel Anand Math. Wikimedia Commons
Vande Mataram was a part of Bankim Chandra Chatterji’s most famous novel Anand Math. Wikimedia Commons

Thus, 2006 was not the 100th year of Vande Mataram, but the 129th anniversary of the `National Song”, which was first recited at the Indian National Congress session of 1896.

Also Read: 10 Must Knowing Facts about Indian Flag

Well before the Congress’ Varanasi session on September 7, 1905, Vande Mataram was adopted as the `National Song’ and won India’s heart as its war cry of freedom.

On January 24, 1950, it was brought at par with the National Anthem officially by the Constituent Assembly.

The protest against Vande Mataram because of its ‘idolatrous’ content began in the 1890s. The Congress party surrendered before Islamic opposition at its Kakinada session in 1923 not only on the Vande Mataram issue but also to all symbols and values held national.

The recent HRD ministerial diktat to compulsorily sing the song throughout the country occupied much media space and ignited a debate on India’s national song’s journey over the last 130 years.

Also Read: 15 Amazing Facts About The Revolutionary Bhagat Singh

The song served as a source of immense strength and inspiration for freedom fighters before India gained freedom.

The Sangh Parivar, better known as the Rashtriya Swayam Sewak Sangh (RSS) celebrated the 125th anniversary of the song in 2002. Wikimedia Commons
The Sangh Parivar, better known as the Rashtriya Swayam Sewak Sangh (RSS) celebrated the 125th anniversary of the song in 2002. Wikimedia Commons

Take a look at some of the glorious facts related to our National song, ‘Vande Mataram’.

  1. The National song, ‘Vande Mataram’ was written by the great Bengali poet and writer, Bankim Chandra Chatterjee.
  2. On January 24, 1950, it was adopted as the National Song of India.
  3. The National song of India, Vande Mataram is considered as the foundation of encouragement to the people in their struggle for freedom. The National song of India is versed in the Sanskrit and Bengali languages, in the novel ‘Anandmath’ by Bankim Chandra Chatterji.
  4. The former President of India, Dr. Rajendra Prasad, on January 24, 1950, came up with a declaration in the Constituent Assembly that the song Vande Mataram, which had played a significant part in the historic freedom struggle held in India, should be honoured equally with Jana Gana Mana and must give equal status to it.
  5. The National song was a part of Bankim Chandra Chatterji’s most famous novel Anand Math (1882) which is set in the events of Sannyasi rebellion.
  6. The first translation of Bankim Chandra Chatterji’s novel Anand Math, into English was done by Nares Chandra Sen-Gupta, in 1906.
  7. In the 1896 session of the Indian National Congress, it was the first political event when the National song was sung. On the same occasion, the national song of India was first sung by the Rabindranath Tagore.
  8. Poet Sarala Devi Chaudurani sang the national song in the Benares Congress Session in 1905.
  9. The Iron Man of India, Lala Lajpat Rai, published a journal called Vande Mataram from Lahore.

    Dr. Rajendra Prasad, on January 24, 1950, came up with a declaration that Vande Mataram should be honoured equally with Jana Gana Mana and must give equal status to it. Wikimedia Commons
    Dr. Rajendra Prasad, on January 24, 1950, came up with a declaration that Vande Mataram should be honoured equally with Jana Gana Mana and must give equal status to it. Wikimedia Commons
  10. Vande Mataram was recited in the first political film made by Hiralal Sen in 1905.
  11. The Sangh Parivar, better known as the Rashtriya Swayam Sewak Sangh (RSS) celebrated the 125th anniversary of the song in 2002.
  12. Two stanzas of the original song have been officially declared as the National Song of India in 1950 after the independence of India.
  13. The song was originally written in two languages, Sanskrit and Bengali, in the novel ‘Anandmath’.
  14. It was also sung by the Dakhina Charan Sen in 1901 after five years during another Congress meeting at Calcutta.
  15. India’s first political film Hiralal Senmade, made in 1905 ends with the chant Vande Mataram.