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Rotten Wooden Bridge is a Fragile Lifeline for Inhabitants of a small Russian village

The Rotten Wooden Bridge which is the only lifeline of the inhabitants of the village of Luch, southeast Ukraine, Russia is likely to collapse due to no maintenance

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Russia, November 6, 2016: The Rotten Wooden Bridge which is the only lifeline of the inhabitants of the village of Luch, in Luhansk Oblast, a provincial city of southeast Ukraine, Russia stays rotten under water, and snow and is likely to collapse due to no maintenance.

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‘We have to trod through this unstable bridge for even buying bread for our livelihood’, says one of the locals. It is so because all the shops, schools, and market lies on the either side of the river. The city does have an alternate route of 20 kilometers out of the town and they can take the dirt road through the forest but unfortunately, to add to the precarious condition it even lacks public transport, therefore their only option is to walk all the way.

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The bridge was built by a local Sanatorium, which shut down two years, and no measures were taken to reconstruct or maintain it. The regional officer, Alekseki Starkov stated they have been processing the registration of this bridge since a year. But they are waiting for the court’s verdict after which the bridge will be accepted as the district property, it is only then they will they be able to proceed. So until the court’s judgment is favorable, the bridge will face the threat of a drop.

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The weather doesn’t seem to support the survival of this bridge. In spring, large chunks of ice float down the river making the conditions worse for the bridge as it may break and be swallowed under water.

prepared by Shinega Kalai of NewsGram. Twitter: @acloudonthesky

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Cybercrimes cost businesses $600 billion globally: McAfee report

Cybercrime losses are greater in richer countries; however, the countries with the greatest losses are mid-tier nations that are digitised but not yet fully capable of cybersecurity, the report noted.

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Russia, North Korea and Iran are the most active in hacking financial institutions, while China is the most active in cyber espionage.
Russia, North Korea and Iran are the most active in hacking financial institutions, while China is the most active in cyber espionage. Wikimedia Commons

Cybercrimes have cost businesses close to $600 billion globally — or 0.8% the global GDP — which is up from $445 billion reported three years back, a report said on Thursday.

The report by the global cybersecurity firm McAfee, prepared along with the Centre for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), said that over the last three years, cybercriminals have quickly adopted new technologies to ease the process of engaging in cybercrimes.

“Ransomware-as-a-Service Cloud providers efficiently scale attacks to target millions of systems, and attacks are automated to require minimal human involvement,” Steve Grobman, Chief Technology Officer for McAfee, said in a statement.

Also Read: Indian companies more prone to cyber attacks

“Add to these factors cryptocurrencies that ease rapid monetisation, while minimising the risk of arrest, and you must conclude that the $600 billion cybercrime figure reflects the extent to which our technological accomplishments have transformed the criminal economy as dramatically as they have every other portion of our economy,” he added.
The report, titled “Economic Impact of Cybercrime — No Slowing Down”, said that banks remain the favourite target for cybercriminals.

McAfee, Inc. is an American global computer security software company.
McAfee, Inc. is an American global computer security software company. Wikimedia Commons

Russia, North Korea and Iran are the most active in hacking financial institutions, while China is the most active in cyber espionage.

“Our research bore out the fact that Russia is the leader in cybercrime, reflecting the skill of its hacker community and its disdain for Western law enforcement,” said James Lewis, Senior Vice President at CSIS.

“North Korea is second in line, as the nation uses cryptocurrency theft to help fund its regime, and we’re now seeing an expanding number of cybercrime centres, including not only North Korea but also Brazil, India and Vietnam,” Lewis added.

Cybercrime losses are greater in richer countries; however, the countries with the greatest losses are mid-tier nations that are digitised but not yet fully capable of cybersecurity, the report noted. (IANS)

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