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Russia accuses Turkey of shooting down jet to defend ISIS oil supply

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New Delhi: Russian President Vladimir Putin on Monday accused Ankara of shooting down a Russian warplane to safeguard oil supplies from the Islamic State (IS) group to Turkey. Russia confirmed that the oil deposits controlled by IS transited through Turkey on an industrial scale responding to which Turkish President Recep Erdogan said he would “resign if this is confirmed.”

Moscow accused Turkey of shooting down a Russian Su-24 on November 24 to protect illicit oil supply from Syria to Turkey, on several grounds said Putin on the sidelines of the climate change summit in Paris on Monday.

“We have every reason to believe that the decision to down our plane was guided by a desire to ensure the security of this oil’s delivery routes to ports where they are shipped in tankers,” said Putin in an interview with a Russian daily.

Meanwhile, the Turkish authorities refused to apologise over the incident, as they accused Moscow of rolling out sanctions intended at unleashing economic revenge. Putin blamed Ankara of protecting Islamic State oil exports after rejecting Turkish President’s proposition of a discussion on the sidelines of Paris Summit.

He went on to claim that the country was supporting sources and funds for the jihadist group. The shooting down of the Russian jet on the Turkey-Syria border was the first time that a Nato country struck off a Russian plane since 1952 and rebuked relations between the two conflicting actors in the Syria conflict.

Russia also positioned further halt on reciprocal economic sanctions aimed at damaging Turkey’s fundamental tourism and agricultural sectors. Putin declared bans on chartered flights and the sale of package holidays, scrapping Russia’s visa-free regime with the country.

 

Moscow has several times requested Ankara to “stop this practice,” Putin added, but specified that Russia “traced some (terrorist activities) located on the territory of the Turkish Republic and living in regions guarded by special security services and police that have used the visa-free regime to return to our territory, where we continue to fight them,” he said.

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Facebook, Twitter Urged to Do More to Police Hate on Sites

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Twitter to soon release Snapchat like feature. VOA
Fake accounts on Twitter are many. VOA

Tech giants Facebook, Twitter and Google are taking steps to police terrorists and hate groups on their sites, but more work needs to be done, the Simon Wiesenthal Center said Tuesday.

The organization released its annual digital terrorism and hate report card and gave a B-plus to Facebook, a B-minus to Twitter and a C-plus to Google.

Facebook spokeswoman Christine Chen said the company had no comment on the report. Representatives for Google and Twitter did not immediately return emails seeking comment.

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Facebook one of the most popular apps in US. Pixabay
Facebook one of the most popular apps in US. Pixabay

Rabbi Abraham Cooper, the Wiesenthal Center’s associate dean, said Facebook in particular built “a recognition that bad folks might try to use their platform” as its business model. “There is plenty of material they haven’t dealt with to our satisfaction, but overall, especially in terms of hate, there’s zero tolerance,” Cooper said at a New York City news conference.

Rick Eaton, a senior researcher at the Wiesenthal Center, said hateful and violent posts on Instagram, which is part of Facebook, are quickly removed, but not before they can be widely shared.

He pointed to Instagram posts threatening terror attacks at the upcoming World Cup in Moscow. Another post promoted suicide attacks with the message, “You only die once. Why not make it martyrdom.”

Cooper said Twitter used to merit an F rating before it started cracking down on Islamic State tweets in 2016. He said the move came after testimony before a congressional committee revealed that “ISIS was delivering 200,000 tweets a day.”

ALSO READ: Teenagers using Social Media more likely to suffer sleep deprivations: Study

facebook
This photo shows Facebook launched on an iPhone, in North Andover, Mass., June 19, 2017. VOA

Cooper and Eaton said that as the big tech companies have gotten more aggressive in shutting down accounts that promote terrorism, racism and anti-Semitism, promoters of terrorism and hate have migrated to other sites such as VK.com, a Facebook lookalike that’s based in Russia.

There also are “alt-tech” sites like GoyFundMe, an alternative to GoFundMe, and BitChute, an alternative to Google-owned YouTube, Cooper said.

“If there’s an existing company that will give them a platform without looking too much at the content, they’ll use it,” he said. “But if not, they are attracted to those platforms that have basically no rules.”

The Los Angeles-based Wiesenthal Center is dedicated to fighting anti-Semitism, hate, and terrorism. (VOA)

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