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Sanskrit University still on papers, no Improvement in Panchkula

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Panchkula: The project of building up a Sanskrit university is yet to take place, despite its announcement made by the Haryana education minister Ram Bilas Sharma a year before.

Recommendation from the Mansa Devi shrine board is yet to be received regarding a suitable land for the project.

The Minister announced the formation of the university in the premises of the temple during his visit to the temple last year in December.

The university would cater to the need of the students interested in pursuing their future in the Sanskrit language, offering various undergraduate and post-graduate courses.

“The university would be set up on the land given by the shrine board and the cost of construction would be borne by them. Till date, we have not received any proposal from them regarding the site that they have earmarked and how much land they are willing to provide for the university. So, we cannot go ahead with the project,” said deputy director, higher education, Arun Joshi.

The fourth remainder is already been sent to the shrine board earlier on this Wednesday, the first one which was sent on February 18, 2015; but there seems no response by their side.

The project was announced as being the part of the Haryana government’s Education project to promote and encourage dissemination of knowledge Sanskrit and Vedic texts among students.

“The proposal is pending with the Shrine Board. Until they identify the site and ready to transfer the land, we cannot formulate the proposal for administrative approval and budgetary allocation. The requirement of land should also include possible expansion in the near future, as hostels will also be built, apart from academic blocks. Mere 10-acre would not be sufficient,” said Joshi.

The proposal was further approved by Chief Minister Manohar Lal Khattar.(inputs from agencies)

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Child Rights Summit: Nations Should Spend More on Education Over Weapons

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Displaced Syrian children look out from their tents at Kelbit refugee camp, near the Syrian-Turkish border, in Idlib province, Syria, Jan. 17, 2018. VOA

Countries should spend more on schooling and less on weapons to ensure that children affected by war get an education, a child rights summit heard Monday.

The gathering in Jordan was told that a common thread of war was its devastating impact in keeping children out of school.

Indian Nobel laureate Kailash Satyarthi, who founded the summit, said ensuring all children around the world received a primary and secondary education would cost another $40 billion annually — about a week’s worth of global military expenditure.

ALSO READ: Politics and Education: A Relationship that contributes a lot in shaping our Future

child rights summit
Nobel Peace Prize laureates Kailash Satyarthi and Malala Yousafzai listen to speeches during the Nobel Peace Prize awards ceremony at the City Hall in Oslo, Dec. 10, 2014. VOA

“We have to choose whether we have to produce guns and bullets, or we have to produce books and pencils to our children,” he told the second Laureates and Leaders for Children Summit that gathers world leaders and Nobel laureates.

Global military expenditure reached almost $1.7 trillion in 2016, according to the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute. The United Nations children’s agency UNICEF said last year 27 million children were out of school in conflict zones.

ALSO READ: Exclusive: How is One Woman Army changing the notions of Education in society?

“We want safe schools, we want safe homes, we want safe countries, we want a safe world,” said Satyarthi, who shared the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize with Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai for his work with children.

Jordan’s Prince Ali bin al-Hussein told the summit, which focused on child refugees and migrants affected by war and natural disasters, that education was “key,” especially for “children on the move.”

“Education can be expensive, but never remotely as close to what is being spent on weapons. … They [children] are today’s hope for a better future,” he told the two-day summit.

Kerry Kennedy, president of Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights, a nonprofit group, described the number of Syrian refugees not in school in the Middle East as “shocking” as the war enters its eighth year.

Kennedy cited a report being released Tuesday by the KidsRights Foundation, an international children’s rights group, which found 40 percent of school-aged Syrian children living in Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan, Egypt, and Iraq cannot access education. VOA

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