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Scientists likely to name new fish after US President Barack Obama to honour his decision to create new protected area of Hawaiian coast

The dorsal fin coloration of the male is a circular red spot ringed with blue which scientists said reminded them of Obama's campaign logo

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WASHINGTON, September 3, 2016: Scientists are set to name a new fish after US President Barack Obama honouring his decision to create a new protected area of the Hawaiian coast.

The National Geographic reported on Friday that the maroon and gold creature, which was discovered 300 ft deep in the waters off Kure Atoll, is the only known fish to live within Papahanaumokuakea, an expanse of coral reefs and seamounts home to more than 7,000 species, CNN reported on Saturday.

Last week, Obama established the largest protected marine sanctuary in the world when he more than quadrupled the size of the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument to protect reefs, marine life habitats, and other resources.

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The expansion will add 442,781 sq.miles to the monument, making it now a total of 582,578 sq.miles.

The dorsal fin coloration of the male is a circular red spot ringed with blue which scientists said reminded them of Obama’s campaign logo, CNN reported.

“It’s very reminiscent of Obama’s (campaign) logo,” Richard Pyle, a marine biologist, told the magazine.

“How appropriate that a fish we were thinking about naming after him anyway, just to say thank you for expanding the national monument, happens to have a feature that ties it to the President.”

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 The species was discovered this past June during a research trip to Kure, the world’s northernmost atoll, CNN reported citing the National Geographic.

This is not the first time Obama has had a fish named after him.

Scientists named an aqua and orange speckled freshwater darter found in the Tennessee River Etheostoma Obama in 2012, CNN added. (IANS)

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Martin Greenfield, A Holocaust Survivor Now Dresses Celebs

While washing and scrubbing one of the Nazi’s uniforms, I ripped the collar of the shirt

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Holocaust Survivor Becomes America’s Tailor
Holocaust Survivor Becomes America’s Tailor, VOA

But Greenfield did not arrive at his career in a usual way. He didn’t dream of growing up to sew clothes, or learn the business as an apprentice. Instead, Greenfield’s first encounter with a needle and thread happened when he was a prisoner at the Auschwitz concentration camp in 1944. He was 15 years old.

​“While washing and scrubbing one of the Nazi’s uniforms, I ripped the collar of the shirt. The guard became angry and beat me with his baton. A nice man working in the laundry taught me how to sew a simple stitch,” says Greenfield.

The kapo having no more use for the shirt, Greenfield kept the shirt for himself.

“I eventually took the shirt and wore it all through the concentration camp, until I got to another camp (Buchenwald) and they made me take it off.”

Martin Greenfield
Martin Greenfield, VOA

For Greenfield, the shirt had much value.

“The day I first wore the shirt was the day I learned clothes possess power. Clothes don’t just ‘make the man,’ they can save the man. The kapos treated me a little better. Even some of the prisoners did the same. Wearing the shirt, the kapos didn’t mess with me and they thought I was somebody.”

Greenfield’s parents and siblings were also at the concentration camp. The family was forced by the Nazis to leave their small hometown of Pavlovo, Czechoslovakia. Once at the camp, Greenfield never saw his family again. His father, mother, sisters, brother, and grandparents were killed. His life was spared.

“My father said no matter what job they give you, you do it and you will always survive. And I did survive,” he says.

After World War II, Greenfield immigrated to the United States.

Martin Greenfield holding the suit he stitched
Martin Greenfield holding the suit he stitched, VOA

He landed a job at GGG Clothing Company as a “floor boy” – someone who ran errands and did odd jobs. But he worked his way up, and in 1977 he bought the company and give it his name: Martin Greenfield Clothiers.

Greenfield is 89 years old now. His two sons, Jay and Tod, along with more than 100 other people, work at his company. But Greenfield still comes to the shop every day and walks the floor, managing workflow production and paying close attention to detail. When asked about his success, Greenfield gives credit to the talent and hard work of his employees. He also notes the importance of a satisfied customer.

Also read: Yazidi Woman who Survived Genocide Equates the Current Situation to Jewish Holocausts

“When I deliver a suit and they put it on and say, ‘My God, this is beautiful’, they know it is the quality we produce,” he says. “We satisfy our customers so they could come back again because we have the best suits ever!”  (VOA)