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State Sponsored Terrorism? Two killed including a pregnant woman in Balochistan

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Human Rights Violations, Azghar Baloch
World Baloch Organisation Activist Azghar Baloch brings Human Rights Violations to the notice of International Community, Wikimedia
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Quetta, March 05, 2017: A residence in Alandoor area of Buleda, Balochistan was invaded by Pakistan forces. It has been reported that two people have been killed and the rest five have been abducted.

The house was known to be of Abdul Khaliq, a civilian. The attack was unexpected because of which Abdul Khaliq and his daughter-in-law Fatima Baloch were killed on the spot whereas several other people were injured, mentioned balochwarna.com.

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Fatima Baloch pleaded the Pakistani force to spare her life and not attack her home but was shot in the head right away. It is learned that she was pregnant and even coaxed about the same.

After shooting Fatima Baloch, the Pakistan forces opened aimless firing and shelling at the house due to which Abdul Khaliq also died instantly.

At least five people were arrested and taken to discreet locations.There have been similar cases in the vicinity where Pakistan forced looted and burned the houses to ashes.

– prepared by Naina Mishra of Newsgram, Twitter: @Nainamishr94

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A spurt in Unneeded Medical Interventions for Healthy Pregnant Women: WHO Study

WHO’s new guidelines include 56 evidence-based recommendations on the best care for mother and baby during labour and immediately after

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Olufemi Oladapo, a medical officer in WHO’s Department of Reproductive Health and Research, says every labour and childbirth is unique, and it is perfectly normal for some women to be slower than the prescribed rate of cervical dilation. Wikimedia Common
Olufemi Oladapo, a medical officer in WHO’s Department of Reproductive Health and Research, says every labour and childbirth is unique, and it is perfectly normal for some women to be slower than the prescribed rate of cervical dilation. Wikimedia Common
  • WHO is launching new recommendations aimed at reducing potentially harmful interventions
  • WHO says health providers tend to intervene medically when the rate of labour appears to be slower than what is considered normal
  • WHO warns unnecessary labour and potentially harmful routine medical interventions are rampant in all parts of the world – in poor and rich countries alike

The World Health Organization (WHO) warns healthy pregnant women are undergoing unnecessary medical interventions at an alarming rate. Given the trend, WHO is launching new recommendations aimed at reducing potentially harmful interventions.

The organization reports most of the estimated 140 million annual births occur without complications. Yet, it says over the past 20 years there has been a significant rise in medical interventions previously used to avoid risks. These include oxytocin infusion to speed up labour and caesarean sections.

WHO says health providers tend to intervene medically when the rate of labour appears to be slower than what is considered normal. This is based on a long-held benchmark for cervical dilation to occur at a rate of one centimetre per hour.

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Olufemi Oladapo, a medical officer in WHO’s Department of Reproductive Health and Research, says every labour and childbirth is unique, and it is perfectly normal for some women to be slower than the prescribed rate of cervical dilation.

The World Health Organization (WHO) warns healthy pregnant women are undergoing unnecessary medical interventions at an alarming rate. Pixabay
The World Health Organization (WHO) warns healthy pregnant women are undergoing unnecessary medical interventions at an alarming rate. Pixabay

He says WHO has set another boundary for cervical dilation of up to five centimetres per hour during the first stage of labour until the woman is ready to push out the baby.

“It should not be longer than 12 hours for first-time mothers. And it should not be longer than 10 hours in subsequent labours…. So, as long as a woman is making some progress within that time frame, and the condition of the mother as well as the baby are reassuring, then there should be no reason for intervening,” Oladapo said.

WHO warns unnecessary labour and potentially harmful routine medical interventions are rampant in all parts of the world – in poor and rich countries alike. WHO’s new guidelines include 56 evidence-based recommendations on the best care for mother and baby during labour and immediately after.

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These include permitting a woman to have a companion of choice present during labour and childbirth; ensuring good communication between women and health providers; and allowing women to make decisions about their pain management, labour and birth positions. (VOA)

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