Friday April 20, 2018

Struggling to save your relationship? Try and express Gratitude!

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New York, April 15, 2017: Struggling to save your relationship? Try and express gratitude, which may not only boost your relationship but also enhance your psychological and physical well-being, a study has found.

The findings, published in the journal Review of Communication, showed that gratitude contributes to long-term success in relationships and personal well-being — “up to six months after a deliberate expression to one’s relationship’s partner.”

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Just as we periodically boost our immune system through vaccines, we can boost our relationships and mental state by expressing gratitude to our partners on a regular basis, the researchers said.

Expressions of gratitude are often a response to others’ acts of generosity — if you receive a gift from someone, or an act of kindness, you reciprocate by showing gratitude, sometimes publicly, to highlight the giver’s altruistic act.

Gratitude is a different emotion from happiness because it so often stems from the actions of another individual.

“To experience gratitude, one must receive a message, and interpret the message,” said Stephen M. Yoshimura from the National Communication Association — a US-based not-for-profit.

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“Gratitude consistently associates with many positive social, psychological, and health states, such as an increased likelihood of helping others, optimism, exercise, and reduced reports of physical symptoms,” Yoshimura said.

Regularly communicating gratitude may also enhance our social connectedness.

In addition, people who experience and express gratitude have reported fewer symptoms of physical illness, more exercise, and better quality of sleep.

Various studies have also shown that expressing and experiencing gratitude increases life satisfaction, vitality, hope and optimism.

Moreover, it also contributes to decreased levels of depression, anxiety, envy and job-related stress and burnout, the researchers noted. (IANS)

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Couples bad at picking up on partner’s sad feelings: Study

For the study, over 100 participants completed daily diaries about their mood and the mood of their partners for seven consecutive nights

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Couples have tough time understanding soft negative emotions like sadness, loneliness of each other: Study.
Couples have tough time understanding soft negative emotions like sadness, loneliness of each other: Study.
  • Researchers have found that couples find it tough to identify negative soft emotions
  • Relationship related emotions can be identified more easily
  • The unidentified emotions can cause problems in relationships

Your spouse may react immediately when you feel anger, but is he/she equally good at knowing when you feel sad or lonely? No, suggests new research.

Couples do pretty well at picking up one another’s more intense feelings, like happiness or anger, but they are not as sensitive to “soft negative” emotions, said the study published in the journal Family Process. Couples do poorly when it comes to knowing their partner is sad, lonely or feeling down, the findings showed.

Couples do poorly when it comes to soft negative emotions of each other.
Couples do poorly when it comes to soft negative emotions of each other.

“We found that when it comes to the normal ebb and flow of daily emotions, couples aren’t picking up on those occasional changes in ‘soft negative’ emotions like sadness or feeling down,” said study lead author Chrystyna Kouros, Associate Professor at Southern Methodist University, Dallas, US.

The researchers believe that even when a negative mood is not related to the relationship, it ultimately can be harmful to a couple. “Failing to pick up on negative feelings one or two days is not a big deal,” Kouros said.

Also Read: Tamil Nadu to Build Safe Houses for Inter-Caste Couples

“But if this accumulates, then down the road it could become a problem for the relationship. It’s these missed opportunities to be offering support or talking it out that can compound over time to negatively affect a relationship,” she added.

For the study, over 100 participants completed daily diaries about their mood and the mood of their partners for seven consecutive nights. The problem is not one for which couples need to seek therapy, Kouros said.

Instead, she advises couples to stop assuming they know what their partner is feeling. “I suggest couples put a little more effort into paying attention to their partner — be more mindful and in the moment when you are with your partner,” she said.

She cautions, however, against becoming annoying by constantly asking how the other is feeling, or if something is wrong. IANS

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