Super Tuesday on March 1: What does it mean for US presidential Primaries

US Presidential Candidate

Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton were the big winners Saturday, February 21 in the latest round of US presidential primary voting. Trump easily prevailed in the South Carolina primary while Clinton won a narrow victory over Senator Bernie Sanders in the Nevada caucuses.

The two now are in driver’s seat and have a psychological advantage over their rivals.
As you might know, Presidential elections will happen in November this year and the newly elected President will assume office in January of 2017, replacing Barack Obama.

What are Primaries or caucuses: As part of inner -party democracy, presidential aspirants have to fight among themselves to secure a ticket or nomination for the election from the respective party. These primary elections (called primaries or caucuses) are held state-wise in the US. So far, 3 primaries have happened- in Iowa, New Hampshire and South Carolina. From the Republican side, Donald Trump is leading, while in Democratic party primaries, Hillary Clinton is leading.

On Tuesday, March 1, 2016, as many as 11 states will hold primaries together, thus called Super- Tuesday. Naturally, who so ever winds, will be marching ahead with much more force and conviction.

As primaries keep going, candidates keep dropping out of the race. Typically, at some point, only one candidate is left in the fray with clear lead (or at least so much lead that trailing candidates see no point in contesting further)and the party nominates him/her for the Presidential elections.

Presidential elections in the US are long drawn battles and it takes a mammoth amount of money to contest. In the world’s strongest democracy, money makes the mare go, rest stand no chance how influential they may be. Without money, you do not stand a chance to be visible.

VOA National correspondent Jim Malone has a wrap-up of the Saturday voting from Washington….
The video is brought to you by NewsGram in collaboration with VOA.