Wednesday January 17, 2018
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Supreme Court receives suggestions from the Government to improve collegium system

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By- Tarun Pratap

New Delhi: The Centre Government today suggested to the Supreme Court that the power to suggest the name of judges to the top most judicial post should be with the President, Prime Minister and the Attorney Journal.

The Government said that this will help in the better functioning of the judicial system and will bring more transparency to it.

Supreme Court was told that law ministry received 3500 representations to improve the existing collegium system.

Some other suggestions were that the terms of appointment should include a clause where if it is found out that a candidate gave wrong information about the asked things, he or she should be removed without the process of impeachment.

Another suggestion was that the decision making in the appointment of the judges should be under the scanner of RTI so that it brings transparency and the common man also is informed about it.

Supreme Court today started hearing the suggestions to improve the collegium system which has been a matter of controversy in recent times. While the government wanted to abolish the collegium system and bring NJAC where the government gets more say in the appointment of the judges.

However, the Supreme Court called it an obstruction in the freedom of the judiciary system of India.

This was one of the issues where all the parties were united and the government faced no opposition which made it a direct tussle between the judiciary and the executive and the legislature body of the country.

Arun Jaitley had called it a disappointing result from the Supreme Court.

While, the most people including from the judiciary itself believe that the current collegium system is flawed and requires an overhaul, but the people in the judiciary have been afraid that the NJAC undermines their own power and gives too much of say to the government.

This struggle seems to go far, but it is good that an effort from both sides to improve the old system and bring more transparency can be noticed. However, it will be better if it does not turn into a bitter struggle between the pillars of the democracy.

(With inputs from agencies)

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Government ends Haj subsidy as part of a new policy

Announcing the decision, Minority Affairs Minister Mukhtar Abbas Naqvi said it was in line with the government's agenda to empower minorities without appeasing them.

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A total of 1.75 lakh Indian Muslims can go for Haj this year. Wikimedia Commons
A total of 1.75 lakh Indian Muslims can go for Haj this year. Wikimedia Commons
  • The government had drafted the policy after the Supreme Court asked it in 2012 to withdraw it gradually by 2022
  • The government would utilise the funds saved from withdrawing the subsidy for the education of minorities, particularly girls
  • This year, the highest number of Indian pilgrims are likely to go for the pilgrimage

The central government on Tuesday said it has decided to withdraw subsidy given to hundreds and thousands of Muslims for the annual Haj pilgrimage.

Announcing the decision, Minority Affairs Minister Mukhtar Abbas Naqvi said it was in line with the government’s agenda to empower minorities without appeasing them.

“This is part of our policy to empower minorities with dignity and without appeasement,” Naqvi told reporters here.

He said the government would utilise the funds saved from withdrawing the subsidy for the education of minorities, particularly girls.

Also Read: Muslim women can now travel to Haj without Mahram

The government had drafted the policy to abolish the Haj subsidy in a phased manner after the Supreme Court asked it in 2012 to withdraw it gradually by 2022.

This year, the highest number of Indian pilgrims are likely to go for the pilgrimage after Saudi Arabia increased India’s quota by 5,000.

A total of 1.75 lakh Indian Muslims can go for Haj this year. IANS

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