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Sushma Swaraj: Indian culture can help environmental concerns

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New Delhi: External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj on Monday said that Indian philosophy, lifestyle and cultural practices are established on the knowledge of guarding the nature and it holds significant impact in resolving environmental problems like global warming.

“Indian philosophy, lifestyle, traditions and cultural practices are based on the science of protecting the nature. This needs to be explained to the global community. Till a lifestyle based on Indian philosophy isn’t adopted, solutions to the environmental problems caused by global warming will be elusive,” she said.

Sushma was addressing a conference as the chief guest at the closing ceremony of the two-day national session on “Global Warming and Climate Change – A Way Out”.

She further categorised the reasons of terrorism and climate change as the two major global areas of concern, the Union Minister specifically focused on the necessity for reviving cultural customs that are environmentally friendly and helps protect it.

In the race of development by individual countries, some of the developed nations have triggered severe destruction to the Mother Earth.

“Now they expect solutions from the nations, which are not responsible for the crisis.” She further added.

She also emphasised on the fact that development engineered by fabricated techniques has given way to difficulties for the environment, the irony of the situation is that such artificial solutions are further being discovered.

Emphasising on the richness and diversity of Indian culture, she said that traditions of the country are purely based on science and philosophy.

To find a solution to issues regarding environmental chaos one needs to bring change in their lifestyle as it is one of the biggest contributors to the problem of global warming, she gave details in her address.

Asking people to bring changes in their approach to the environment, Sushma requested people to quit their greed to save the earth and promote the need-based use of natural resources to advantage solutions to the problem of global warming.

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Arctic permafrost may unleash carbon within decades: NASA

Plants remove carbon dioxide from the air during photosynthesis, so increased plant growth means less carbon in the atmosphere

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NASA to release two missions focused on moon soon in 2022. Pixabay
NASA positive about next planet-hunting mission. Pixabay
  • Permafrost in Northern Arctic can potentially become a permanent source of Carbon
  • It was previously thought to be safe from the effects of Global Warming
  • Rising temperature in the Arctic can cause severe carbon emissions

Permafrost in the coldest northern Arctic — formerly thought to be at least temporarily shielded from global warming by its extreme environment — could thaw enough to become a permanent source of carbon to the atmosphere in a few decades, warns a NASA-led study. This will happen in this century, with the peak transition occurring in 40 to 60 years, said the study.

Permafrost in Northern Arctic can become a permanent source of carbon in this century itself, according to NASA. Wikimedia Commons
Permafrost in Northern Arctic can become a permanent source of carbon in this century itself, according to NASA. Wikimedia Commons

Permafrost is soil that has remained frozen for years or centuries under topsoil. It contains carbon-rich organic material, such as leaves, that froze without decaying, NASA said in a statement on Tuesday.

As rising Arctic air temperatures cause permafrost to thaw, the organic material decomposes and releases its carbon to the atmosphere in the form of the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and methane.

The researchers calculated that as thawing continues, by the year 2300, total carbon emissions from the coldest northern Arctic will be 10 times as much as all human-produced fossil fuel emissions in 2016.

Warmer, more southerly permafrost regions will not become a carbon source until the end of the 22nd century, even though they are thawing now, said the study led by scientist Nicholas Parazoo of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.

That is because other changing Arctic processes will counter the effect of thawing soil in these regions.

The finding that the colder region would transition sooner than the warmer one came as a surprise, according to Parazoo. The researchers used data on soil temperatures in Alaska and Siberia and a numerical model that calculates changes in carbon emissions as plants grow and permafrost thaws in response to climate change.

They assessed when the Arctic will transition to a carbon source instead of the carbon-neutral area it is today — with some processes removing about as much carbon from the atmosphere as other processes emit.

World is under threat due to Global Warming. Wikimedia Commons

They divided the Arctic into two regions of equal size, a colder northern region and a warmer, more southerly belt encircling the northern region. There is far more permafrost in the northern region than in the southern one.

Over the course of the model simulations, northern permafrost lost about five times more carbon per century than southern permafrost.

The southern region transitioned more slowly in the model simulations, Parazoo said, because plant growth increased much faster than expected in the south.

Also Read: Global warming portends ill for India’s flourishing Dairy sector: Experts

Plants remove carbon dioxide from the air during photosynthesis, so increased plant growth means less carbon in the atmosphere.

According to the model, as the southern Arctic grows warmer, increased photosynthesis will balance increased permafrost emissions until the late 2100s. IANS