Saturday March 24, 2018

The three ‘Cardinal Sins’ which have done harm to the ‘MEDICAL PROFESSION’ in India


By Dr J.K Bhutani

A practicing doctor’s take on the sins of medical profession in India

A Constitution Bench of the Supreme Court Monday recalled its order which had held the all-India common entrance test for medical admissions as ‘illegal’ and unconstitutional’ on the ground that it interfered with the right of private, minority and linguistic institutions to admit students……!

The restoration of NEET for MBBS/BDS and MD/MDS by the honorable Supreme Court is indeed a progressive decision. The introduction of NEET in 2012 by MCI, though a step in the right direction was thwarted by the powerful lobby of politicians who own most of the private medical colleges and have a solid-illegal business of nearly 25000 crores plus every year. Unfortunately the sane VOICE of Justice Anil.K.Dave who dissented to the partisan decision (2:1) of July-2013, which was delivered on flimsy grounds and (may be) some ulterior motives of the honorable judges, has prevailed for the good of the profession, society and the nation.
A doctor needs to pass the rigor of the merit-based-entrance, intensive training and the massive load and expectations of sick patient to have a satisfying career and also to retain the PRESTIGE and GLORY of this noble profession. A capitation-fed, poorly trained and pampered-one-rich-quota- doctor is neither good for the profession nor the patient.
The seething painful scars of ‘VYAPAM scam of MP’ and many such scams of almost all the private medical colleges and the deemed universities in the minds of impressionable budding doctors and public, surely are in for some relief at last.
The repute and the prestige of medical profession is not ALL the fault of the doctors but the fallout of many unrealistic government législations and blind aping of the American healthcare-model.
The three ‘Cardinal Sins’ which have done harm to the ‘MEDICAL PROFESSION’ in India are….

  1.  Inclusion of ‘Art of Medical Practice’ in Consumer Protection Act-1986
  2. Unregulated Privatization and CAPITATION Medical Education in 1990
  3. Health as a ‘RUTHLESS target oriented business model’ by corporate India in 1990s.

The reversal of capitation is just one REVERSAL which the Honorable court has expectantly addressed. we need more reversals of the above sins too.
NO society can be a cherished place if it practices HEALTH as a PROFIT or BUSINESS
The history shall teach us one day in future that HEALTH as a service, social responsibility and charity is the ONLY way to heal the mankind…!
We need to learn from Cuba and Britain and not blindly follow America.

Dr J.K Bhutani MD is a protagonist of preventive and promotive health care based on austere biology and facilitating self healing powers of human organism. He practices in Karnal, Haryana. Twitter: @drjkbhutani

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  • Ashwati Menon

    Medicine has been a revered profession since time immemorial. privatization of medical institutes can effect the authenticity of it

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Heart attacks more common in winter

Every second person in the age group of 30 and above, who are already otherwise at risk, is prone to heart failure during winter, experts say

heart attack
Heart attacks are most likely in winters.

Think twice if you find alcohol the solution for keeping your body warm during winter. Medical experts caution that, apart from the common cold and cough, winter is also the time when more heart attacks occur. Every second person in the age group of 30 and above, who are already otherwise at risk, is prone to heart failure during winter, experts say.

They also say that one should not ignore irregular discomfort in chest, severe sweating, pain in the neck, arms, jaws and shoulders or shortness of breath during winter, which are major symptoms of heart failures.

Heart attacks are most likely to happen to old people in winters. Flickr

According to Vanita Arora, associate director and head of Cardiac Electrophysiology Lab and Arrhythmia Services in Max Hospital, “Everyone knows winter is the cold and flu season. But most people are unaware of the fact that it is also the prime season for heart attacks.”

She said during winter, the arteries become constricted with the fall in temperature, as a result of which the heart has to put in more effort to pump the blood. “This makes the heart stress out and it leads to a heart attack,” Arora told IANS, adding: “It is more risky for those who do not have any inkling about pre-existing heart conditions.”

Arora said that people above 30 should never indulge in overdoing anything and exhausting oneself in winter. She suggested that people, and especially diabetic patients, should avoid going for a walk in the morning on extremely chilly days and should shift their walks to the late afternoon when it is still sunny.

Arora said that too much alcohol intake during winter can cause atrial fibrillation, the most common irregular heartbeat problem called arrhythmia. In this, people tend to suffer from palpitations, fainting, chest pain or congestive heart failure.

Also Read: Heart Attack Symptoms In Women Often Misinterpreted

Heart experts said that a constant check on cardiovascular risk factors is one way to ensure that the winter season doesn’t harm one’s health. People should avoid overeating during winter and should rather eat in small quantities at regular intervals, experts suggest.

Neeraj Bhalla, senior consultant in cardiology at the B.L. Kapoor Memorial Hospital, said that as the blood’s viscosity increases with the drop in temperature, heart attacks and other coronary artery diseases increase during winter.

“Cholesterol levels fluctuate significantly with the change in season, which may leave people with
borderline high cholesterol with greater cardiovascular risk during the winter months. Apart from managing cholesterol levels, it is crucial that we keep small things in mind and do not stress the heart”, Bhalla said.

People staying in places where the seasons change very frequently are more prone to heart failures in comparison to those living in cold countries. Heart failure leads to most deaths in hypothermia – a condition in which the core temperature drops below the temperature for normal metabolism. Bhalla said to keep hypothermia at bay, it is advisable to cover yourself with layers of warm clothes. Besides this, it is advisable to take a bath only with warm water.

Alcohol should be avoided to keep body warm during winters.

Chandan Kedawat, senior consultant cardiology at the Pushpawati Singhania Research Institute, said: “In cold weather, the heart demands more oxygen because it is working harder.” Studies have shown that heart attacks and complications related to heart disease occur more frequently in the morning hours.

Research suggests that the early-morning rise in blood pressure or “a.m. surge” that occurs in most people may dramatically increase the risk of a heart attack or stroke. “In the winter, people tend to exert themselves or do more work in the morning because it gets dark earlier,” Kedawat said.

“This shift of activities to morning hours adds to the normal circadian variation (cardiac variations that recur every 24 hours) in the mornings – further increasing the heart rate, blood pressure and the hormones that lower the threshold for a cardiovascular event,” he explained. He advises that the best way to prevent such situations for people above 30 is to go for an alternate day check up to the doctors. IANS