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Times Lit Fest presents Lifetime Achievement Award to Noted Author Ruskin Bond in Delhi

Ruskin Bond advised his young readers to become "one's own best friend" and read as many books as possible

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Books by Ruskin Bond. Wikimedia

New Delhi, Nov 26, 2016: Noted author Ruskin Bond was presented with a Lifetime Achievement Award at Times Lit Fest here on Saturday for his outstanding contribution in the field of literature.

Bond, moments after receiving the award, reminded his young readers of climate change in the course of conversation with writer Paro Anand.

“Nature has been really kind to me. So I think I can give back to the nature by celebrating it. I am not an activist, but I can celebrate it in my writings,” the author said as he took a pause to think.

[bctt tweet=””For the sake of our children and grandchildren, we should try and save the planet.”” username=””]

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“For the sake of our children and grandchildren, we should try and save the planet,” he said.

Bond was speaking to a packed house, comprising of young school children and elderly, at India Habitat Centre here.

“I am not a pessimist so I will not say that life will end in 50 years. I am an optimist so I will say that life may end in 150 years,” said an emotional Bond, whose writings reflect his close proximity to the nature.

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“It has always been my observation that I have written better when I am in the lap of the nature. People have been my stories, animals have been my stories and when I run out of people and animals, I make stories out of ghosts. But there is an element of nature all through.”

He advised his young readers to become “one’s own best friend” and read as many books as possible.

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“Reading books has sustained me right from a young boy to this age. It has always made me feel that life is beautiful,” he said.

Bond also responded to questions from young readers and shared his answers on diverse issues, ranging from the current state of children’s literature in the country to the number of times he has fallen in love at first sight, second sight or at hindsight, for that matter. (IANS)

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A little truth needs to be added in children’s literature

Children's literature needs to be developed with changing time and society

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Literature for Kids in India
Indian literature was all about mythology but now things are changing.Wikimedia Commons

– Paro Anand

I grew up in a house of books and reading. Every evening, we had what was called a “quiet time”, when we sat together just before dinner, listening to classical music and reading our own books. I hated that time. I resented being made to sit still and quiet. But my parents and sisters were avid readers; so I just had to fall in line.

I started reading whatever my sister seemed to enjoy. So at the age of 12 or so, I began reading “Great American Plays” and German poet Bertolt Brecht. I was part of a theatre group and so found reading plays fascinating. It did me more good than harm to be reading way beyond my years. I went back to reading these plays much later and enjoyed them in a totally different way. There didn’t seem to be much distinction between literature for children and adults. The lines had barely been formed. And there was no parental interference, we were free to pick any book off our parent’s shelves.

Yes, I was reading William Shakespeare, Pooh and also, Brecht, all at the same time. Whatever took my fancy. The biggest change from my growing-up years to my children’s and onwards is that there were practically no Indian books to choose from other than the usual mythology and folktales, not for the young reader, at any rate. When my children were growing up, there were some books for them to choose from that lay within India. Besides Ruskin Bond and R.K. Narayanan, there was also “Target” magazine which showcased some wonderful new writers like Sigrun Srivastava, Anupa Lal, Subhadra Sengupta and Deepa Agarwal, among many others.

“Target” and “Children’s World” spearheaded a much-needed trend of Indian writing in the contemporary context. Sadly, “Target” was closed down — a great disservice to children’s literature, I feel. Childrens Book Trust and National Book Trust were also bringing out exciting new writings like Arup Kumar Datta’s “The Kaziranga Trail”, which remains one of my all-time favourites along with Sigrun Srivastava’s “A Moment of Truth”.

And this trend has continued unabated. The growing number of foreign publishers coming into India and then starting a children’s imprint supports this. Of course, Penguin’s Puffin has been around for a long time, but they are bringing out exciting books that break new ground. Even Indian publishers like Duckbill, which is dedicated to young literature, Speaking Tiger launching Talking Cub, Rupa launching Red Turtle and Full Circle’s Tota Books are all important moves in the right direction.

Scholastic, the biggest children’s publisher worldwide, has been very successful in India, holding book fairs in schools. Schools themselves hold Book Weeks and book events where authors are invited. I am working with several book sellers who sell my books in the hundreds at schools. Supplementary readers are often from Indian authors.

The problem, I feel, is really one of access. While more and more schools are putting in a lot of effort to get books to their students, once that push is over and children have got excited by reading, where do they go? Where do they get more information about new releases and new authors? Media and bookseller support is a must. The growing trend of local literary festivals that has been sparked by the tremendous success of the Jaipur Lit Fest sees huge numbers of school students flocking there looking to meet and hear authors and buy copies.

Today, as I proudly receive my Sahitya Akademi Bal Sahitya Puraskar Award, I am humbled as I see how far we have come in the journey of winning a deserving status for children’s literature. Think of it, the Sahitya Akademi awards have been given since the 1950s to those writing for adults. The prize for children’s writers came only in 2010. So, yes, it has been a long time coming. But it is here.

There are now wonderful writers writing about real issues, real life — the lives that young people are grappling with every day. “Unbroken” by Nandhika Nambi (Duckbill) and “Slightly Burnt” by Payal Dhar (Bloomsbury) are wonderful books that are important in marking the paths of children’s literature in the modern context.

I speak, of course, only of Indian literature in English. There was a time when I could speak with some authority about the Indian languages but can no longer claim adequate knowledge. However, sitting on the stage to receive the Bal Sahitya Puraskar by Sahitya Akademi, I was so proud to be with other winners from 23 other languages, including Santhali, Manipuri, Dogri and others. It is important that our Indian languages and young literature in them are equally experimental, equally brave and path-breaking.

Yes, there is a place for mythology and folk tales. There is room for monsters and rakshasas, but there is also room for the monsters that inhabit our real world. The issues of dichotomy and prejudice. There is space for children to read about the issues that are already impacting them on an everyday basis as well as issues that they should know about. There is a time for fantasy and there is a time for truth. The fantasy has always been there. It’s time to put a little truth and trust in the hands of our young. (IANS)

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Mahalaya: Beginning of “Devipaksha” in Bengali Celebration of ‘Durga Puja’

“Mahalaya” is the auspicious occasion that marks the beginning of “Devipaksha” and the ending of “Pitripaksha” and heralds the celebration of Durga Puja

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Mahalaya morning in Kolkata. Flickr
  • Mahalaya 2017 Date: 19th september.
  • On Mahalaya, people throng to the holy river Ganges in order to pay homage to their ancestors and forefathers; which is called ‘Torpon’
  • Mahalaya remains incomplete without the magical chanting of the scriptural verses from the ‘Chandi Kavya’ that is broadcasted in All India Radio
  • The magic is induced by the popular Birendra Krishna Bhadra whose voice makes the recitation of the “Chandi Kavya” even more magnificent

Sept 19, 2017: Autumn is the season of the year that sees the Hindus, all geared up to celebrate some of the biggest festivals of India. The festive spirit in the Bengalis all enthused to prepare for the greatest of the festivals, the ‘Durga Puja’.

About Mahalaya:

Mahalaya is the auspicious occasion that marks the beginning of “Devipaksha” and the ending of “Pitripaksha,” and this year it is celebrated on September 19.

Observed exactly a week before the ‘Durga Puja’, Mahalaya is the harbinger of the arrival of Goddess Durga. It is celebrated to invoke the goddess possessing supreme power! The goddess is invited to descend on earth and she is welcomed with devotional songs and holy chants of mantras. On this day, the eye is drawn in the idols of the Goddess by the artisans marking the initiation of “Devipaksha”. Mahalaya arrives and the countdown to the Durga Puja begins!

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The day of Mahalaya bears supreme significance to the Bengalis. The day is immensely important because on this day people throng to the holy river Ganges in order to pay homage to their ancestors and forefathers. Clad in white dhotis, people offer prayers and take dips in the river while praying for their demised dear ones. The ritual is popular as “Torpon”.

Mahalaya
An idol-maker in progress of drawing the eye in the idol of the Goddess. Wikipedia

As per Hindu myth, on “Devipaksha”, the Gods and the Goddesses began their preparations to celebrate “Mahamaya” or Goddess Durga, who was brought upon by the trinity- Brahma, Vishnu, and Maheshwara; to annihilate the fierce demon king named Mahishasura. The captivating story of the Goddess defeating the demon got popularized with the goddess being revered as “Durgatinashini” or the one who banishes all the evils and miseries of the world. The victory of the Goddess is celebrated as ‘Durga Puja’.

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Mahalaya remains incomplete without the magical chanting of the scriptural verses from the ‘Chandi Kavya’ that is broadcasted at dawn in All India Radio in the form of a marvelous audio montage enthralling the souls of the Bengalis. Presented with wonderful devotional music, acoustic drama, and classical songs- the program is also translated to Hindi and played for the whole pan-Indian listeners.

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Mahalaya
Birendra Krishna Bhadra (1905-1991). Wikipedia

The program is inseparable from Mahalaya and has been going on for over six decades till date. The magic is induced by the popular Birendra Krishna Bhadra whose voice makes the recitation of the “Chandi Kavya” even more magnificent! He has been a legend and the dawn of Mahalaya turns insipid without the reverberating and enchanting voice of the legendary man.

Mahalaya will keep spreading the magic and setting the vigor of the greatest festival of the Bengalis- the Durga Puja, to worship the supreme Goddess, eternally.

                 “Yaa Devi Sarbabhuteshu, Shakti Rupena Sanhsthita,

                     Namastaswai Namastaswai Namastaswai Namo Namaha.”

– by Antara Kumar of NewsGram. Twitter: @ElaanaC

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Gear Up Indian Women Writers! Time to Call for Celebration on August 24

The festival is likely to call attention to gender issues, creativity, issues revolving around feminism

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women writers
Woman opening a sheet. Pixabay

Bengaluru, Aug 22, 2017: In today’s era, it would be wrong to say that there is a dearth of female writers or no female writers at all. From illustrated novels to mythology and humorous copies to science fiction — it would be a mistake to pigeonhole these writing styles as the male-centric. Definitely not when there are a plethora of women writers existent in this domain.

Here is a chance to all the women authors out there to showcase their talent to the city with an initiative called “SheThePeople”. It is a storytelling platform that invigorates women to swap ideas and work in a well-accorded manner.

[bctt tweet=”The Women Writers’ Fest is being organised primarily for the first time in Bengaluru on August 24. ” username=”NewsGramdotcom”]

Also Read: Women Writers’ Festival will discuss issues that shape Women Professionals in the 21st Century 

Pronouncing it as a  celebration of the Indian women writers, publishers, storytellers, editors and novelist, the communications consultant Rupali Mehra, also associated with the event, stated: “We have conducted two events in Delhi and Mumbai. Bengaluru was chosen this time as it has produced talented women authors and poets and has a vibrant reading culture,” mentioned The Hindu report.

The event will witness the participation of writers including Sowmya Aji, Shinie Antony, Jahnavi Barua, Jane De Suza, Priyanka Pathak Narain and Gita Aravamudan.

The founder of SheThePeople, Shaili Chopra said: “The idea was to give rise to a platform where we give women voices the majority. That said, our programmes are not restricted to just women. We encourage men to be part of this dialogue”.

The event is reported to have panel discussions on women writing humour, women bloggers, short stories, children’s literature, and mythology among others. The festival will put the spotlight on gender issues, feminism, creativity, and narratives created by women to define their space.

The festival is likely to call attention to gender issues, creativity, issues revolving around feminism, anecdotes devised by women to mark their space.

Author and blogger Kiran Manral on the need for an event focussing only women said: “Women writers need a space where they can discuss issues that inform their writing which can be different from what male writers face. A festival like this provides a warm nurturing space to have these conversations.”


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