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Times Lit Fest presents Lifetime Achievement Award to Noted Author Ruskin Bond in Delhi

Ruskin Bond advised his young readers to become "one's own best friend" and read as many books as possible

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Books by Ruskin Bond. Wikimedia

New Delhi, Nov 26, 2016: Noted author Ruskin Bond was presented with a Lifetime Achievement Award at Times Lit Fest here on Saturday for his outstanding contribution in the field of literature.

Bond, moments after receiving the award, reminded his young readers of climate change in the course of conversation with writer Paro Anand.

“Nature has been really kind to me. So I think I can give back to the nature by celebrating it. I am not an activist, but I can celebrate it in my writings,” the author said as he took a pause to think.

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“For the sake of our children and grandchildren, we should try and save the planet,” he said.

Bond was speaking to a packed house, comprising of young school children and elderly, at India Habitat Centre here.

“I am not a pessimist so I will not say that life will end in 50 years. I am an optimist so I will say that life may end in 150 years,” said an emotional Bond, whose writings reflect his close proximity to the nature.

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“It has always been my observation that I have written better when I am in the lap of the nature. People have been my stories, animals have been my stories and when I run out of people and animals, I make stories out of ghosts. But there is an element of nature all through.”

He advised his young readers to become “one’s own best friend” and read as many books as possible.

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“Reading books has sustained me right from a young boy to this age. It has always made me feel that life is beautiful,” he said.

Bond also responded to questions from young readers and shared his answers on diverse issues, ranging from the current state of children’s literature in the country to the number of times he has fallen in love at first sight, second sight or at hindsight, for that matter. (IANS)

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Mahalaya: Beginning of “Devipaksha” in Bengali Celebration of ‘Durga Puja’

“Mahalaya” is the auspicious occasion that marks the beginning of “Devipaksha” and the ending of “Pitripaksha” and heralds the celebration of Durga Puja

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Mahalaya morning in Kolkata. Flickr
  • Mahalaya 2017 Date: 19th september.
  • On Mahalaya, people throng to the holy river Ganges in order to pay homage to their ancestors and forefathers; which is called ‘Torpon’
  • Mahalaya remains incomplete without the magical chanting of the scriptural verses from the ‘Chandi Kavya’ that is broadcasted in All India Radio
  • The magic is induced by the popular Birendra Krishna Bhadra whose voice makes the recitation of the “Chandi Kavya” even more magnificent

Sept 19, 2017: Autumn is the season of the year that sees the Hindus, all geared up to celebrate some of the biggest festivals of India. The festive spirit in the Bengalis all enthused to prepare for the greatest of the festivals, the ‘Durga Puja’.

About Mahalaya:

Mahalaya is the auspicious occasion that marks the beginning of “Devipaksha” and the ending of “Pitripaksha,” and this year it is celebrated on September 19.

Observed exactly a week before the ‘Durga Puja’, Mahalaya is the harbinger of the arrival of Goddess Durga. It is celebrated to invoke the goddess possessing supreme power! The goddess is invited to descend on earth and she is welcomed with devotional songs and holy chants of mantras. On this day, the eye is drawn in the idols of the Goddess by the artisans marking the initiation of “Devipaksha”. Mahalaya arrives and the countdown to the Durga Puja begins!

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The day of Mahalaya bears supreme significance to the Bengalis. The day is immensely important because on this day people throng to the holy river Ganges in order to pay homage to their ancestors and forefathers. Clad in white dhotis, people offer prayers and take dips in the river while praying for their demised dear ones. The ritual is popular as “Torpon”.

Mahalaya
An idol-maker in progress of drawing the eye in the idol of the Goddess. Wikipedia

As per Hindu myth, on “Devipaksha”, the Gods and the Goddesses began their preparations to celebrate “Mahamaya” or Goddess Durga, who was brought upon by the trinity- Brahma, Vishnu, and Maheshwara; to annihilate the fierce demon king named Mahishasura. The captivating story of the Goddess defeating the demon got popularized with the goddess being revered as “Durgatinashini” or the one who banishes all the evils and miseries of the world. The victory of the Goddess is celebrated as ‘Durga Puja’.

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Mahalaya remains incomplete without the magical chanting of the scriptural verses from the ‘Chandi Kavya’ that is broadcasted at dawn in All India Radio in the form of a marvelous audio montage enthralling the souls of the Bengalis. Presented with wonderful devotional music, acoustic drama, and classical songs- the program is also translated to Hindi and played for the whole pan-Indian listeners.

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Mahalaya
Birendra Krishna Bhadra (1905-1991). Wikipedia

The program is inseparable from Mahalaya and has been going on for over six decades till date. The magic is induced by the popular Birendra Krishna Bhadra whose voice makes the recitation of the “Chandi Kavya” even more magnificent! He has been a legend and the dawn of Mahalaya turns insipid without the reverberating and enchanting voice of the legendary man.

Mahalaya will keep spreading the magic and setting the vigor of the greatest festival of the Bengalis- the Durga Puja, to worship the supreme Goddess, eternally.

                 “Yaa Devi Sarbabhuteshu, Shakti Rupena Sanhsthita,

                     Namastaswai Namastaswai Namastaswai Namo Namaha.”

– by Antara Kumar of NewsGram. Twitter: @ElaanaC

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Gear Up Indian Women Writers! Time to Call for Celebration on August 24

The festival is likely to call attention to gender issues, creativity, issues revolving around feminism

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Woman opening a sheet. Pixabay

Bengaluru, Aug 22, 2017: In today’s era, it would be wrong to say that there is a dearth of female writers or no female writers at all. From illustrated novels to mythology and humorous copies to science fiction — it would be a mistake to pigeonhole these writing styles as the male-centric. Definitely not when there are a plethora of women writers existent in this domain.

Here is a chance to all the women authors out there to showcase their talent to the city with an initiative called “SheThePeople”. It is a storytelling platform that invigorates women to swap ideas and work in a well-accorded manner.

The Women Writers’ Fest is being organised primarily for the first time in Bengaluru on August… Click To Tweet

Also Read: Women Writers’ Festival will discuss issues that shape Women Professionals in the 21st Century 

Pronouncing it as a  celebration of the Indian women writers, publishers, storytellers, editors and novelist, the communications consultant Rupali Mehra, also associated with the event, stated: “We have conducted two events in Delhi and Mumbai. Bengaluru was chosen this time as it has produced talented women authors and poets and has a vibrant reading culture,” mentioned The Hindu report.

The event will witness the participation of writers including Sowmya Aji, Shinie Antony, Jahnavi Barua, Jane De Suza, Priyanka Pathak Narain and Gita Aravamudan.

The founder of SheThePeople, Shaili Chopra said: “The idea was to give rise to a platform where we give women voices the majority. That said, our programmes are not restricted to just women. We encourage men to be part of this dialogue”.

The event is reported to have panel discussions on women writing humour, women bloggers, short stories, children’s literature, and mythology among others. The festival will put the spotlight on gender issues, feminism, creativity, and narratives created by women to define their space.

The festival is likely to call attention to gender issues, creativity, issues revolving around feminism, anecdotes devised by women to mark their space.

Author and blogger Kiran Manral on the need for an event focussing only women said: “Women writers need a space where they can discuss issues that inform their writing which can be different from what male writers face. A festival like this provides a warm nurturing space to have these conversations.”


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Indian-born Stanford Professor Thomas Kailath given Lifetime Achievement Award by US-based Marconi Society

Born on June 7, 1935, in Pune to a Malayalam-speaking Syrian Christian family, Kailath graduated in Telecommunications Engineering from the University of Pune in 1956

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Stanford Univerity
Indian-born Stanford Professor Thomas Kailath given Lifetime Achievement Award by US-based Marconi Society. Twitter

New Delhi, August 15, 2017: The US-based Marconi Society has announced its Lifetime Achievement Award to Indian-born Stanford University professor Thomas Kailath, for his outstanding contributions to modern communications.

“Kailath is the sixth scientist to be honored with our Lifetime Achievement Award for his research contributions, which advanced modern communications technologies over the last six decades,” the Society said in an e-mail to IANS on Sunday night.

The 82-year-old who was conferred the Padma Bhushan in 2009, is currently the Hitachi American Professor of Engineering, Emeritus, at Stanford.

The society named after Nobel Laureate Guglielmo Marconi (1874-1937), who invented the radio, was set up in 1975 by his daughter Gioia Marconi Braga through an endowment. It annually awards individuals whose scope of work and influence emulate the principle of “creativity in service to humanity” that inspired Marconi.

The rare honour also makes Kailath join five other recipients of the 43-year-old Society’s prestigious award, including Gordon Moore of the Moore’s Law fame and father of Information Theory Claude Shannon.

The award will be presented to Kailath at the Society’s Awards dinner at Summit, New Jersey on October 3.

At the same event, it will also honour another Indian-born and former Bell Labs president Arun Netravali, 71, with a $100,000 cash prize for his pioneering work in digital video technology, used in smartphones and TVs.

ALSO READ: India-born, US-based Arun Netravali wins 2017 Marconi Prize for Digital Video Technology

“The award is being conferred on Kailath for mentoring a generation of research scholars and writing a classic textbook in linear systems that changed the way the subject is taught and his special purpose architecture to implement the signal processing algorithms on VLSI (Very Large-sale System Integration) chips,” the Society said in the e-mail.

Kailath and his students, who together hold a dozen patents, have transitioned a part of their research into industry and co-founded four technology firms, including Integrated Systems in 1980 and Numerical Technologies in 1996.

Intel acquired Integrated as part of its WindRiver buy in 2009, while Synopsis bought Numerical earlier in 2003.

“The Marconi Award is humbling and moving, as it puts me alongside Shannon, who laid the foundation for our digital age and was one of my teachers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), though I do not consider being at his level,” Kailath told IANS.

Born on June 7, 1935, in Pune to a Malayalam-speaking Syrian Christian family, Kailath graduated in Telecommunications Engineering from the University of Pune in 1956. He went to the US in 1957 to join the MIT, with research assistantship in the Information Theory Group.

He was also the first Indian-born student to be awarded a Doctorate in Electrical Engineering by the MIT in 1961.

Kailath began his career by joining the Digital Communications Research Group of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), a federally funded research and development centre of NASA in Pasadena, California.

He was also a visiting professor at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in the 1960s.

Kailath was a research guide to about 100 doctoral and post-doctoral scholars, including Indian-born scientist Arogyaswami Paulraj, emeritus professor in electrical engineering at Stanford, and whom the Society honoured with the Marconi Prize in 2014 for his work on developing wireless technology to transmit and receive data at high speed.

“Kailath has been an influential mentor to a number of Indian academics, including me. He hosted many of us at his research group at Stanford, even in lean times when federal funding was limited,” the 72-year-old Paulraj recalled.

Kailath and Paulraj are joint holders of the original US patent for Multiple Input, Multiple Output technology that makes wireless networks more efficient.

“While Marconi’s Award recognises Kailath’s achievements at the global level, we in India can take pride in his contributions to the country in advanced technologies,” added Paulraj.

Kailath, who maintained close links with the Bengaluru-based Indian Institute of Science (IISc) for over three decades, was advisor to the Defence Ministry in the 1970s for setting up research centres at the state-run Indian Institute of Technology to support the Air Defence Ground Environment System (ADGES) plan of the Indian Air Force (IAF).

Kailath’s distinguished career earned him scores of awards and honours, notably the National Medal of Science from former US President Barack Obama in 2012 for transformative contributions in information and system science, mentoring young scholars and translating scientific ideas into entrepreneurial ventures that impacted the industry.

“Kailath has been an inspiration for generations of Indian students in communications and information systems. Many of them were privileged to listen to him for the first time, when he spoke at our convocation ceremony in 2011,” said S. Sadagopan, Director, International Institute of Information Technology (IIIT-B) in Bengaluru. (IANS)


NewsGram is a Chicago-based non-profit media organization. We depend upon support from our readers to maintain our objective reporting. Show your support by Donating to NewsGram. Donations to NewsGram are tax-exempt.