Saturday June 23, 2018

Torn between Dignity and Despair: The Last Jews of Tunisia

Hundreds of Jews who moved away over the past five decades have taken their relatives' remains with them, leaving only these slabs of Hebrew-inscribed marble behind

0
//
585
Jewish exodus from Arab and Muslim countries. Image source: Wikimedia Commons
Republish
Reprint

Djerba, Tunisia, August 22, 2016: Behind the Great Synagogue that anchors this tiny Tunisian Jewish community, cracked tombstones litter the perimeter of the cemetery but it was not vandals who broke them.

Hundreds of Jews who moved away over the past five decades have taken their relatives’ remains with them, leaving only these slabs of Hebrew-inscribed marble behind.

“There are bones that are 80, 90 years old. When you lift them up, they can break,” said Yossif Sabbagh. The 42-year-old local help exhume about a dozen bodies each year for transport to Israel, where the majority of Tunisian-born Jews have moved, and where they want their ancestors to move, too.

Follow NewsGram on Facebook

The flight of the dead seems to portend a bleak future for the Jews of Djerba, who trace arrival on this island to more than two millennia ago, after the sacking of the First Temple in Jerusalem in 586 B.C. More Jews arrived after the Spanish Inquisition and from Morocco, Algeria, and Libya.

They were once the traditional, observant branch of a vibrant Jewish community that numbered 100,000 across Tunisia. But the 1,100 Jews in Djerba are nearly all that are left after most others fled persecution between the 1940s and ’60s.

Jewish Money changer in Tunisia. Image source: Wikimedia Commons
Jewish Money changer in Tunisia. Image source: Wikimedia Commons

Those who remained have been rewarded with new growth thanks in part to an emphasis on large families and patriarchal values. But the community now faces another challenge: Jewish women chafe at their restrictions and men suffer from the battered Tunisian economy. Moving to Israel, whereas Jews they are entitled to automatic citizenship, could resolve both issues but could also bring an end to one of the last Jewish societies in the Arab world.

Point Of Pride

In late May, crowds filled the ornate white-and-blue tiled Ghriba synagogue in Hara Sghira, the smaller of two Jewish enclaves in Djerba, as part of the annual pilgrimage that has long attracted outsiders to the island.

Pilgrims lit candles in the sanctuary and placed eggs covered with handwritten wishes in a cave dug into the synagogue’s floor. Across a cobbled street, revellers sang songs, ate couscous with fish, and drank fig brandy and beer in a sunny courtyard strung with red Tunisian flags.

The event marking the Lag BaOmer feast, which honours the second-century Jewish mystic Rabbi Shimon Bar Yochai, was clearly a point of Tunisian pride.

Follow NewsGram on Facebook

The event had been cancelled in 2011 amid the tumult of the Tunisian revolution that ousted dictator Zine el Abidine Ben Ali, a protector of the country’s Jewish population.

It was restored under the country’s current government, which prizes the community as a symbol of stability. But three major terrorist attacks since the beginning of 2015, along with an infiltration by the extremist group Islamic State just an hour’s drive south of Djerba, raised security concerns and harmed tourism.

Participants and observers at this year’s event appeared unfazed, however.

On the first day of the pilgrimage, Abdelfattah Mourou, deputy speaker of parliament and vice president of the moderate Islamic Ennahda party, embraced Tunisia’s chief rabbi and Djerba resident, Haim Bittan, outside the Ghriba synagogue.

“Tunisia protects its Jews,” Mourou said. “What leads to radicalism is having only one culture. Having many cultures allows us to accept one another.” (BBG DIRECT)

ALSO READ:

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2016 NewsGram

Next Story

Expert: Red Meat, Pork Improve Fertility

Most adults across the globe have chronically low intakes of selenium due to poor levels in soil

0
Expert: Red Meat, Pork Improve Fertility
Expert: Red Meat, Pork Improve Fertility. Pixabay

Nutrients found in red meat play an important role in fertility levels and the general health of women and men planning a pregnancy, says an expert.

The intake of red meat and pork can make a difference, reports femalefirst.co.uk

“Red meat is often associated with fertility in so-called ‘old wives’ tales’ and has been traditionally encouraged in the diets of couples trying for a baby. Now we know from scientific research that the nutrients found in red meat really do have a role in normal fertility,” said Carrie Ruxton from the Meat Advisory Panel.

The Meat Advisory Panel is a group of healthcare professionals who provide independent and objective information about red meat.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

Most adults across the globe have chronically low intakes of selenium due to poor levels in soil.

Hence, numerous reports implicate selenium deficiency in several reproductive complications including male and female infertility, miscarriage, preeclampsia, foetal growth restriction, preterm labour, gestational diabetes and obstetric cholestasis.

Pork is an excellent source of selenium and can, therefore, go some way to boosting selenium levels in adults, thus supporting normal reproduction.

Also Read: Lifestyle Changes Can Cure Infertility

Vitamin B6 is one of the most important vitamins for conceiving and fertility because it contributes to the regulation of normal hormonal activity. Again, red meat is a rich source of Vitamin B6.

“The Government recommends that adults eat up to 500 gm of cooked red meat a week which gives the opportunity for four to five meat meals a week, including pork, ham, beef, lamb and bacon,” added Ruxton. (IANS)