Tuesday May 22, 2018
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Toyota to develop ‘self-driving’ cars

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

tdy_tren_google_140528.nbcnews-video-reststate-560Machines are known to effectively reduce human labor. But the four-wheeler machine that are driven all around the world are set to become self-driven!

Toyota, Japanese automaker will be investing approximately USD 50 million over to the next five years to set up joint research centers at Stanford University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) for developing “intelligent” self-driving cars.

“This bold collaboration will address extremely complex mobility challenges using ground breaking artificial intelligence research. I’m thrilled to be a part of the synergies and talent sharing of Toyota, MIT, and Stanford,” said Gill Pratt, former Program Manager at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).

The two research centers will focus on using technology to make driving safer by inventing ways for cars to recognize their surroundings and make decisions that avert potential accidents.

“Our team will work to help intelligent vehicles recognize objects in the road, predict behaviours of things and people, and make safe and smart driving decisions under diverse conditions,” said Fei-Fei Li, director of the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory.

Not far away from Stanford, both General Motors Co. and Ford Motor Co. have established offices in Palo Alto, California, in their mission to make smarter cars.

After smart phones and smart cities, smart cars are on their way!

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Toyota Announces To Launch TALKING vehicles in U.S. in 2021

Toyota to launch talking vehicles in the United States in the year 2021

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The Toyota logo is seen on a car in Sao Paulo, Brazil, June 2, 2017. Toyota has said it will make automatic emergency braking standard on nearly all its U.S. models by the end of 2017.
The Toyota logo is seen on a car in Sao Paulo, Brazil, June 2, 2017. Toyota has said it will make automatic emergency braking standard on nearly all its U.S. models by the end of 2017. (VOA)

Toyota Motor Corp. plans to start selling U.S. vehicles that can talk to each other using short-range wireless technology in 2021, the Japanese automaker said on Monday, potentially preventing thousands of accidents annually.

The U.S. Transportation Department must decide whether to adopt a pending proposal that would require all future vehicles to have the advanced technology.

Toyota hopes to adopt the dedicated short-range communications systems in the United States across most of its lineup by the mid-2020s. Toyota said it hopes that by announcing its plans, other automakers will follow suit.

The Obama administration in December 2016 proposed requiring the technology and giving automakers at least four years to comply. The proposal requires automakers to ensure all vehicles “speak the same language through a standard technology.”

Automakers were granted a block of spectrum in 1999 in the 5.9 GHz band for “vehicle-to-vehicle” and “vehicle to infrastructure” communications and have studied the technology for more than a decade, but it has gone largely unused. Some in Congress and at the Federal Communications Commission think it should be opened to other uses.

Toyota Car Logo
Toyota Car Logo. Pixabay

In 2017, General Motors Co began offering vehicle-to-vehicle technologies on its Cadillac CTS model, but it is currently the only commercially available vehicle with the system.

Talking vehicles, which have been tested in pilot projects and by U.S. carmakers for more than a decade, use dedicated short-range communications to transmit data up to 300 meters, including location, direction and speed, to nearby vehicles.

The data is broadcast up to 10 times per second to nearby vehicles, which can identify risks and provide warnings to avoid imminent crashes, especially at intersections.

Toyota has deployed the technology in Japan to more than 100,000 vehicles since 2015.

Also Read: Tesla aiming to build 6,000 Model 3 cars per week by end-June

The U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) said last year the regulation could eventually cost between $135 and $300 per new vehicle, or up to $5 billion annually but could prevent up to 600,000 crashes and reduce costs by $71 billion annually when fully deployed.

NHTSA said last year it has “not made any final decision” on requiring the technology, but no decision is expected before December.

Last year, major automakers, state regulators and others urged U.S. Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao to finalize standards for the technology and protect the spectrum that has been reserved, saying there is a need to expand deployment and uses of the traffic safety technology.  VOA

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