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Twenty minutes of cycling a day keeps the heart doctor away

Cardiovascular diseases are responsible for more than 30 per cent of the deaths annually

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Cycling. Pixabay
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October 12, 2016: Just 20 minutes of cycling on a daily basis can reduce the risk of dying from a heart-related disease.
According to ANI “a study conducted by the Purdue University concluded that regular cycling can cut your risk of heart disease by a whopping 50 per cent.”

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Cardiovascular diseases are responsible for more than 30 per cent of the deaths annually.
In India, cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of death.

However, 50 per cent of heart disease-related deaths can be easily prevented by only adopting healthy habits and by a hygienic lifestyle.

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Physical inactivity is one of the significant risk factors for heart disease.
In fact, the physical inactivity is the cause of numerous lifestyle diseases like obesity, diabetes, hypertension, cardiac ailments and even cancer.

According to World Health Organization, one of the ten leading risk factors for death worldwide is insufficient physical activity.

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As much as smoking is a serious health hazard, physical inactivity is equally life risky.
The WHO recommends, adults between the ages of 18 to 64 years should be involved in at least 150 minutes physical activity of moderate-intensity throughout the week.
Even a cycle ride of just 20 minutes daily is sufficient to achieve the target and be healthy.

-by NewsGram team with ANI inputs

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Night Shifts May Raise Risk Of Diabetes

For the study, published in the journal Diabetes Care, the team examined data from more than 270,000 people, including 70,000 who provided in-depth lifetime employment information and a sub-group of more than 44,000 for whom genetic data were available

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The results showed that those with the highest genetic risk scores were almost four times as likely to develop Type 2 diabetes compared to individuals who had lower genetic risk scores. Pexels
The results showed that those with the highest genetic risk scores were almost four times as likely to develop Type 2 diabetes compared to individuals who had lower genetic risk scores. Pexels

Do you frequently work night shifts? Beware, you are more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes, a precursor to cardiovascular diseases, researchers have warned.

Type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition that affects the way the body processes blood sugar (glucose).

The study found that people working irregular or rotating shifts with usual night shifts were 44 percent more likely to have Type 2 diabetes.

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“We see a dose-response relationship between a frequency of night shift work and Type 2 diabetes, where the more often people do shift work, the greater their likelihood of having the disease, regardless of genetic predisposition,” said Ceiine Vetter, Professor at the University of Colorado-Boulder.

In addition, compared to day workers, all shift workers were more likely to have Type 2 diabetes, except for permanent night shift workers, the researchers mentioned. Pexels
In addition, compared to day workers, all shift workers were more likely to have Type 2 diabetes, except for permanent night shift workers, the researchers mentioned. Pexels

“This helps us understand one piece of the puzzle: frequency of night shift work seems to be an important factor,” Vetter added.

For the study, published in the journal Diabetes Care, the team examined data from more than 270,000 people, including 70,000 who provided in-depth lifetime employment information and a sub-group of more than 44,000 for whom genetic data were available.

ALSO READ: 6 Foods You Should Mandatorily Avoid At Night

More than 6,000 people in the sample population had Type 2 diabetes.

Using the information on more than 100 genetic variants that are associated with Type 2 diabetes, the research team developed a genetic risk score that they used to assign a value to each participant.

According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), the global prevalence of diabetes has nearly doubled since 1980, rising from 4.7 percent to 8.5 percent in the adult population. The majority of people with diabetes are affected by Type 2 diabetes. (IANS)

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