Wednesday October 18, 2017
Home India Udyog Bhawan ...

Udyog Bhawan metro station to be made art and culture hub

0
61
credit: www.indiatvnews.com

By NewsGram Staff Writer

credit: www.images.indianexpress.com
credit: www.images.indianexpress.com

New Delhi: Udyog Bhawan metro station of the Delhi Metro will be developed into a hub of art and culture after National Museum and the Delhi Metro signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) on Thursday.

Press release from Delhi Metro Rail Corporation (DMRC) said, “As per the agreement, the Udyog Bhawan metro station on the Jahangirpuri-HUDA City Centre (Yellow Line) corridor will be developed as the gateway to the National Museum. Art works and artifacts will be displayed at the concourse area (both paid and unpaid areas) of the station.”

“While National Museum will arrange, display as well as maintain the art works, artifacts etc, DMRC will provide the necessary space and other ancillary requirements such as cabling, wiring, civil work etc. The displays will also be periodically changed by National Museum so that the visitors to the station get to see new artifacts and art works from time to time,” it added.

The agreement was signed at the Metro Bhawan on Thursday between DMRC’s executive director (operations), Vikas Kumar, and National Museum director general Sanjiv Mittal in the presence of DMRC managing director Mangu Singh and other senior officials.

DMRC has associated with many other government bodies/organizations such as the culture ministry, Delhi Tourism, India Habitat Centre, the Indian Council of Historical Research as well as independent artists for setting up display panels, art works etc at the metro stations across the network.

This MoU is a continuation of the Delhi Metro’s efforts to utilize its premises for the promotion of Indian art and culture.

With inputs from IANS

Next Story

Assam Government signs a MoU with Google India to expand Internet Connectivity

It will provide Internet connections to 26,000 villages and 1,500 tea garden areas in Assam

0
53
Assam Government has signed MoU with Google India to expand Internet Connectivity
Assam Government has signed MoU with Google India to expand Internet Connectivity. Pixabay

Guwahati, Assam, September 8, 2017: The Assam government on Thursday signed a MoU with Google India to take Internet connectivity to the remotest part of the north-eastern state.

Chief Minister Sarbananda Sonowal said the government would work to provide Internet connections to 26,000 villages and 1,500 tea garden areas in Assam under the MoU and thus increase digital literacy.

Information Technology Secretary Nitin Khare and Google India Country Head (Policy) Chetan Krishnaswami signed the Memorandum of Understanding in the presence of Sonowal.

“Technology rules the roost in the 21st century and the state government has upped the ante to use technology to carry forward the fruits of development to the remotest parts of Assam,” the Chief Minister said.

He said the ties with Google was a way forward to strongly pitch Guwahati as a natural gateway to the South-East Asian countries.

Sonowal said his government in sync with the Centre was working for the success of Startup initiative but the success of such programmes sans technology would be a distant dream.

“The MoU will be used as a launchpad to achieve the state government’s vision of women empowerment, skill development, and universal education,” he said.

The Chief Minister asked the Information Technology Department to take steps to make technology acceptable and favourable among the rural populace so as to catalyse rural development. (IANS)

 

Next Story

India, US sign Memorandum of Understanding for cooperation in Traditional Medicine

The MoU was signed by Rajiv Kumar Sharma, Director, PCIM & H and Dr. K.V. Surendra Nath, Senior Vice President, Global Sites, USP

1
299
Ayurveda. Image source: www.linkedin.com

New Delhi, Aug 25, 2016: An official statement declared that the Pharmacopoeia Commission for Indian Medicine and Homoeopathy (PCIM&H) and the United States Pharmacopeial Convention (USP) inked a MoU on Wednesday for cooperation in traditional medicine.

It will also cover collaboration in identification, development, and dissemination of science-based standards in this field at an international level, it said.

Follow NewsGram on Twitter

The MoU was signed by Rajiv Kumar Sharma, Director, PCIM & H and Dr. K.V. Surendra Nath, Senior Vice President, Global Sites, USP in the presence of AYUSH (ayurveda, yoga, unani, siddhant and homeopathy) Secretary Ajit Sharan.

Representational Image-AYUSH
Representational Image-AYUSH

According to the ministry, the goal of the MoU is to enhance public health in India, US, and globally by working together to increase the awareness and understanding of quality traditional and herbal medicines, botanical dietary supplements, and their products.

Follow NewsGram on Facebook

“The goal will also be to increase the availability and access to needed public standards for traditional/herbal medicines, botanical dietary supplements, and their products,” said the statement. (IANS)

ALSO READ:

One response to “India, US sign Memorandum of Understanding for cooperation in Traditional Medicine”

  1. This agreement sounds like it has laudable goals, but it must be remembered that many U.S. regulatory agencies are controlled by Pharmaceutical corporations. Pharma is dedicated to undermining homeopathy and other traditional medicines, which compete in the market place for its drugs. One of their methods is to make standards for traditional medicines so high, that only corporate entities can meet them. This way they drive smaller producers out of business. The way this agreement unfolds must be watched very closely.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Next Story

‘Bog Butter’ dating back to 2,000 years discovered in Co Meath, Ireland

Bog was used by ancient people to preserve dead bodies

0
450
Bog butter. Image source: Wikimedia Commons
  • A 2,000 years old “bog butter” weighing 22-pounds recently discovered
  • The confounding fact is that it could also be “theoretically… still edible”
  • Such methods of preserving things in bogs were surprisingly common back in those days

An enormous lump of “bog butter” weighing 22-pounds, which is believed to be buried almost 2,000-year-ago, was recently discovered in Co Meath, Ireland. But why would one bury it with intent to preserve it for so long? There is only one possible reason – Ancient butter experts believe that it was once offering to the gods.

Follow NewsGram on Twitter: @newsgram1

Bog butter it as a “creamy white dairy product, which smells like a strong cheese.”  The massive find, while not unusual, has been enclosed in a refrigerated case and given to the National Museum, where it will be preserved, said an atlasobscura report.

Such methods of preserving things in bogs were surprisingly common back in ancient times. Without salt, butter would spoil quickly, but the cold, low-oxygen environment of the bog could probably act as an unreal refrigerator. To ensure the protection of Bog butter, it is sometimes found enclosed in wooden containers or animal skin. Bog was even used by ancient people to preserve dead bodies.

The Butter which is estimated to be over 2,000 years old has gone to the Conservation Department, National Museum for research and analysis. Image source: Caravan County Museum
The Butter which is estimated to be over 2,000 years old has gone to the Conservation Department, National Museum for research and analysis. Image source: Caravan County Museum

The confounding fact is that it could also be “theoretically… still edible” according to Andy Halpin, one of the Irish National Museums’ assistant keepers. Although, it won’t be advisable to taste it before proper examination and there is little possibility of it tasting good. Also, if it’s true that it was an offering to God then one would have to figure out whether or not to eat the butter meant for Gods.

Follow NewsGram on facebook: NewsGram 

Archaeologist Ross MacLeod commented on the quantity of butter discovered in Galway. Speaking to the Irish Times he said, “It would have been a substantial loss to the family that buried the butter in the bog that they never recovered it. Perhaps the person who buried it died or forgot where it was left…That might have been stored up by a family during the summer and put into the bog for use during the cold winter months. Its loss could have been a tremendous one for some family a long, long time ago.”

-By Pashchiema, an intern at NewsGram. Twitter: @pashchiema

ALSO READ