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Urinary tract infections may be curbed using cranberries: Study

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New York: Cranberries can help curb recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs), the second most common type of infection in the body, says a study by an Indian-origin researcher.

A lower number of infections would mean less use of antibiotics and less risk of developing antibiotic resistance.

In addition, the unique blend of polyphenol antioxidants — provided by cranberries — may assist in preserving the heart and cognitive health, and protect against oxidative stress to help promote overall well-being, the findings showed.

“We have long believed in the urinary tract health benefits that cranberries provide, but this new research reveals just how wide-ranging those benefits can be,” said Kalpana Gupta, professor of medicine at Boston University School of Medicine in the US.

Gupta highlighted that rising resistance across multiple classes of drugs has made oral options for UTIs often limited and sometimes non-existent.

The findings suggest that cranberries are powerful and may provide whole-body health benefits.

The findings were presented recently at the seventh International Conference on Polyphenols and Health (ICPH 2015) in France.

(IANS)

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Breast cells may behave menace by High Vitamin D

Higher levels of Vitamin D among women

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High vitamin D harming Breast Cancer, Pixabay

Higher levels of Vitamin D among women may reduce their risk of developing breast cancer post menopause, claimed a new study.

The study found that women with blood levels of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (OH) — the main form of vitamin D in blood — above 60 ng/ml (nanograms per millilitre) had one-fifth the risk of breast cancer compared to those with less than 20 ng/ml.

 Vitamin D levels in blood were measured during study visits.
Higher levels of Vitamin D among women may reduce their risk of developing breast cancer post menopause, pixabay

Thus, researchers from the University of California-San Diego determined that the minimum healthy level of 25(OH) in blood plasma should be 60 ng/ml, instead of the earlier recommended higher than the 20 ng/ml.

“Increasing Vitamin D blood levels substantially above 20 ng/ml appears to be important for the prevention of breast cancer,” said lead author Sharon McDonnell from GrassrootsHealth, a non-profit public health research organisation.

Also Read: British researchers discover a protein that can control spread of breast cancer in body

The study, published in the journal PLOS ONE, analysed data from two randomised clinical trials with 3,325 combined women and a prospective study involving 1,713 women with average age of 63.

Participants were free of cancer at enrollment and were followed for a mean period of four years. Vitamin D levels in blood were measured during study visits.

“This study was limited to postmenopausal breast cancer. Further research is needed on whether high 25(OH)D levels might prevent premenopausal breast cancer,” said Cedric F. Garland from UC-San Diego. (IANS.)

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