Friday April 20, 2018
Home Politics US Presidenti...

US Presidential Election 2016: Voting begins across 6 Different Time Zones

Polling booths will open between 6 a.m. and 7 a.m. local time and close between 7 p.m. and 8 p.m

0
//
131
Representational image. Flickr
Republish
Reprint

Washington, November 8, 2016: As Americans go to the polls on Tuesday to elect their 45th president, here’s what to watch out for:

All 50 states and Washington D.C. go to the polls across six different time zones on election day. Thirteen of the states are operating with split time zones.

Depending on the state, polling booths will open between 6 a.m. and 7 a.m. local time and close between 7 p.m. and 8 p.m. (If a voter is in line when polls close, then he or she gets to vote.)

NewsGram brings to you current foreign news from all over the world.

[bctt tweet=”All 50 states and Washington D.C. go to the polls across six different time zones on election day. ” username=””]

But it is not just winning the popular vote that counts. The US’ system is a race to secure 270 out of the 538 votes in the electoral college.

Most of the US will have to wait for polling stations to close (typically between 5.30 a.m Wednesday and 6.30 a.m Indian time) for state projections.

One small town, Dixville Notch in New Hampshire, which is keeping alive a tradition of a midnight vote that began in 1960, has declared its result before the polls even open everywhere else.

Once the polls have closed, there will be a projection for each state based on opinion polls taken throughout the day, which are a good indication of the results – but not always correct.

According to CNN, the solid Republican states are: Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, West Virginia and Wyoming.

The lean Republican comprise Georgia, Iowa, Maine 2nd Congressional District, Ohio and Utah.

The solid Democratic states comprise California, Connecticut, Delaware, Washington DC, Hawaii, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, Washington, Minnesota and New Mexico.

The leans Democratics are Colorado, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Wisconsin.

The Battleground or Swing states (a state where the two major political parties have similar levels of support among voters, important to determine the overall result) are Arizona, Florida, Nevada, Nebraska 2nd Congressional District, New Hampshire and North Carolina.

NewsGram brings to you top news around the world today.

The results are expected to be known in India by 9.30 a.m. IST on Wednesday morning. That’s when West Coast polls close and history suggests a winner’s declared. It was bang on the hour in 2008, and 15 minutes later in 2012.

Polls begin to close in western states from about 10 p.m. ET — or 8.30 a.m. India time.

Usually by around 11 p.m. ET November 8 on the East Coast it becomes clear that one side has prevailed, although the result could come sooner than that.

All eyes will be on the key battleground state of Virginia, which voted for President Barack Obama in 2008 and 2012 but was previously solid Republican.

Georgia is another one to watch. The state has voted Republican since 1996, but the party’s margin of victory has eroded in recent elections.

Also expect projections from Indiana, home to Trump running mate Mike Pence, Kentucky, South Carolina and Vermont.

Half an hour later, polls close in two further important states, North Carolina and Ohio, the swing state which has backed the winner at every presidential contest.

By 8 p.m. ET (6.30 a.m. IST), Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Rhode Island, Delaware, Connecticut, the District of Columbia, Pennsylvania, Mississippi, Missouri, Alabama, Tennessee and Oklahoma will begin their state projections.

Another half hour later (7 a.m. India time) polls will close in Arkansas, which backed former President Bill Clinton at successive elections in the 1990s, but has voted Republican since 2000.

New York, Colorado, Michigan, Texas, Kansas, Louisiana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, Wyoming and Nebraska might show their projections by now.

Polls close in the biggest electoral prize on the map, California, which is a Democratic stronghold, as well as Oregon, Washington, Idaho and Hawaii — 10.30 p.m. ET or 9 a.m. India time.

Check out NewsGram for latest international news updates.

Depending on how the electoral college is stacking up, every media outlet could declare the next president of the US.

The president-elect will not actually become the 45th president of the US until January 20, 2017, which is Inauguration Day. The president-elect will place his or her hand on the bible and take the Oath of Office at noon.

From then, the government is in their hands. So is the White House. Usually, the sitting president and their spouse host the incoming-First Couple for tea before the ceremony.
About six hours later, the new First Family moves in. (IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2016 NewsGram

Next Story

Upgrade of murder charge of the white nationalist, James Alex Fields Jr. in Virginia car killing

James Alex Field Jr. murder charge has been upgraded from second degree to first degree who has been accused of killing a 32 year old woman in Charlottesville, Virginia.

0
//
42
FILE - A photo of Heather Heyer, who was killed during a white nationalist rally, sits on the ground at a memorial the day her life was celebrated at the Paramount Theater in Charlottesville, Virginia.
FILE - A photo of Heather Heyer, who was killed during a white nationalist rally, sits on the ground at a memorial the day her life was celebrated at the Paramount Theater in Charlottesville, Virginia.
  • James Allex Fields Jr., the white nationalist who murdered a woman in Virginia.
  • The murder charge has been upgraded for the accused
  • Second-degree murder changed to first-degree murder

US, December 14, 2017: A white nationalist accused of killing a 32-year-old woman when he plowed his car into a crowd of counterprotesters in Charlottesville, Virginia, in August was charged with first-degree murder Thursday, local media reported.

James Fields Jr., 20, appeared at Charlottesville District Court for a preliminary hearing, during which a previous charge of second-degree murder was changed to first-degree murder, local TV station WSET and others reported from the court.

James Alex Fields Jr., 20, is seen in a mugshot released by Charlottesville, Virginia, police department.
James Alex Fields Jr., 20, is seen in a mugshot released by Charlottesville, Virginia, police department.

Fields would face up to life in prison if convicted of first-degree murder, while second-degree murder carries a penalty of five to 40 years in prison, according to the Virginia penal code.

Court officials and the local district attorney were not immediately available for comment.

Ohio-native Fields is suspected of killing Heather Heyer and injuring 19 people.

The incident took place amid clashes between hundreds of white supremacists and counterprotesters. After hours of clashes, a sedan driving at high speed plowed into the crowd before reversing along the same street.

Charlottesville is home to the University of Virginia’s flagship campus.

Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe blamed neo-Nazis for sparking the unrest in the city, where rival groups fought pitched battles using rocks and pepper spray after far-right protesters converged to demonstrate against a plan to remove a statue of a Confederate war hero.

After the rally, Republican President Donald Trump said there were “very fine people” on both sides, drawing condemnation from some Republican leaders and praise from white supremacists. (VOA)