Tuesday December 10, 2019

Man-animal conflict in Uttrakhand

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source: wikipedia
source: Hillpost.in
source: Hillpost.in

By Nithin Sridhar

Uttarakhand Chief Minister Harish Rawat said on Saturday that his government will build animal protection walls in villages adjoining the forest areas. The measure, if properly implemented, will help the government decrease the entry of wild animals into human villages that result in man-animal conflicts.

The Chief Minister also suggested growing fruits and fodder bearing trees inside forest areas that are enclosed by protection walls, so that animals will have access to sufficient food within the forest, thereby reducing their need to stray into human habitation.

Uttarakhand has been a hotbed of man-animal conflict since its formation. According to a Times of India report, between 2000 (when the state of Uttarakhand was formed) and 2015, around 400 people have died in some 14,000 villages that exist in proximity of the forests. Of these 400 people, around 241 people were believed to have been killed by leopards. Further, these man-animal encounters have killed 800 leopards, 90 tigers, and 280 elephants during the same period.

A 2012 report on the mortality of the leopard population in Uttarakhand states that, between January 2009 to October 2010, 78 leopards had died in the region. Of those 78 leopards, 11 were found dead, scrambled in a trap and 21 cases of poaching were documented. The report further states that between 2000 and 2008, out of the 394 leopards that died in Uttarakhand area, only 236 were incidents of natural deaths. Around 116 leopards had died due to accidents and 50 died due to poaching. Around 50 tigers were also declared as man-eaters during the same period and most of these were shot as well.

The major reasons for increased man-animal conflicts include poaching, declining availability of food, and the dwindling forest habitat. In the case of leopards, though their population across the country may have decreased by 70-80% in the last 100 years, the population of leopards in Uttarakhand increased between 2003 and 2008. During 2003, the leopard population in Uttarakhand was 2092. This number increased to 2105 in 2005 and to 2335 in 2008.

This increase in leopard population has further increased the competition for food and resources available inside the forest that has further given a rise in the incidents of leopards straying into human settlements in search for food.

Highlighting this, Tushar Rattan, a journalist who writes on conservation, writes in his article: “The Indian leopard is reclusive by nature. But of late it is increasingly venturing into the human habitation because of dwindling prey base, habitat loss, and poaching. There, it preys on dogs, sheep, goats and young ones of cattle. Occasionally, it attacks humans, particularly children and women.” Also, the presence of water and palatable crops in the villages adjacent to the forests have caused the wild animals to roam into the villages.

The branding of leopards as man-eaters is another reason behind the death of leopards. In many such cases, the leopards are named as man-eaters and killed without following due procedure.
Tushar gives an example of 2 leopards that were killed in Himachal Pradesh (another hotbed of man-animal conflicts) after getting the permission of Himachal Pradesh wildlife department to kill the ‘man-eaters’. But, the autopsy done later on the two leopards failed to establish that they were man-eaters.

source: rediff
source: rediff

He points out that for a leopard to be branded and then shot, by law, a special committee has to declare a specific leopard a man-eater after thorough investigation into pug marks, DNA scans of hairs etc. Even then, shooting the animal is to be adopted only as a last resort and after getting a written permission from chief wildlife warden. But, apparently this procedure was not followed in the Himachal incident.
Therefore, poaching, increased competition for resources, shooting of man-eaters, and accidents are among the primary causes for unnatural deaths of leopards. The same holds for many other animals as well.

Measures that could minimize the man-animal conflicts
The best way these conflicts between animals and humans can be reduced is by reducing the interaction between people and the wild-animals. The Uttarakhand government’s plans for building animal protection walls and planting many fruit and fodder bearing trees are very positive and may go a long way in minimizing the conflict.

The 2012 report quoted earlier makes several recommendations for leopard conservation that can be adopted for the conservation of other wildlife as well. These recommendations include:

  1. Conducting a proper census at buffer zones and potential risk sites where leopards’ movement is common but at risk.
  2. Patrolling the villages and other areas surrounding the forest during the night will help in monitoring poaching activities.
  3. Including the knowledge and the opinion of local villagers who are living adjacent to the protected forests in framing the conservation policy.
  4. Community participation should be ensured besides; involvement of local people, government organization, NGOs, and subject experts is highly required.
  5. Affected regions should be monitored sharply and the movement of other wild animals (herbivores) should be ensured. This would help in knowing the specific status of poaching of wildlife.
  6. The reasons behind the death of wild animals must be explored and found out so that it may help in taking proper measures in the future.
  7. Radio-telemetric studies are required on leopards, which were released / translocated to protected habitat. This will be helpful in knowing the adaptation status of the species.

These measures, if implemented thoroughly and consistently, will result in increased protection of wildlife and reduced degree of man-animal conflict.

Next Story

Uttarakhand High Court Bans the Use of Red Chilli Powder to Drive Away Elephants

Sackfuls of chilli powder and chilly bombs were used by people living on the outskirts of the 11 Elephant corridors in the state to shoo away Elephants

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Elephants
Sackfuls of chilli powder and chilly bombs were used by people living on the outskirts of the 11 Elephant corridors in the state to shoo away Elephants and reduce man-animal conflict in the region. Pixabay

After the Uttarakhand High Court banned the practice of using red chillies and chilly bombs to drive away the elephants, the local people are at their wit’s end now.

Sackfuls of chilli powder and chilly bombs were used by people living on the outskirts of the 11 elephant corridors in the state to shoo away elephants and reduce man-animal conflict in the region. However, the High Court put a stop to this on Tuesday.

The elephants from Nepal, as well as the Terai region in Uttar Pradesh, travel to Ramnagar, Corbett and the Kosi river, crossing the patch of the National Highway 121 along which the three elephant corridors — Kota, Chilkiya – Kota, and South Patlidun – Chilkiya are located.

With increasing human population, the corridors have shrunk over the years, bringing the elephants closer to human habitats.

The people living on the outskirts of these corridors, over the years, devised a method of warding off the wild Tuskers. They used to place bags of chilli powder on the outskirts of the settlement and the moment they saw a herd of pachyderms, they would fling the chilli powder into the air. The elephants were forced to retreat.

“The elephants do not come back for a week or so. For the past few years there has been an increase in the elephant population in the area and the animals not only destroy our crops but also attack people. We have no option but to use chili powder because the government is doing nothing,” said Ramesh Tiwari, a resident of Nandpur village.

He admitted that the use of chilli against the elephants was the ‘cheapest and safest option because it did not kill the animal.’ Most of the farmers in the region plant sugarcane which, in turn, attracts the elephants.

In the past one year, there have been over 20 incidents of elephants attacking people.

However, a Public Interest litigation (PIL) was recently filed by a Noida based non-government organisation called ‘Independent Medical Initiative Society’.

Elephants
The three major elephant corridors of Golapar, Fatehpur-Lamachaur and Lalkuan near Haldwani have seen mushrooming of human settlements, thus reducing the age-old path of the Elephants. Pixabay

The petition alleged that the forest department, instead of controlling the human activities on the road passing through these elephant corridors, is trying to control the elephants’ movement by allowing cruel means such as feeding chilli powder-filled flour balls to the wild elephants, putting chilli powder-filled bags on the edge of the road and by firing shots and burning firecrackers to keep them away from the road passing through the elephant corridor.

Dushyant Mainali, the counsel for the petitioner, said: “The division bench of Chief Justice Ramesh Ranganathan and Justice Alok Kumar Verma has banned the use of chilli powder and any other such cruel means against the elephants. The court has also issued directives to the Union Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change. The Ministry has been directed to file the reply within two weeks.”

The petitioner told the court that the “disappointment and frustration due to difficulties in crossing the corridor, are changing the behaviour of elephants in the entire area. The chief reason of concern is the changing behaviour of the baby elephants, which are becoming aggressive day by day and have been found to be involved in most of the incidents of charging.”

According to reports, the corridors are also facing the threat from sand mining in nearby areas, and also a large number of resorts have come up which have increased the traffic flow through the river corridor, thereby disturbing the elephants.

The petition claimed that in the past one year there has been tremendous rise in the human-elephant conflict in the corridors passing on the edge of Corbett National Park and especially on the patch of the Mohaan-Ramnagar Road which is part of NH-121.

Wildlife expert S. R. Rahi said that an elephant requires about 225 litres of water per day and for this the herd of the wild elephants have to travel towards river Kosi and mostly in the night time when it is believed to be safe for them to cross the corridors, but now they are facing the wrath of fast-moving vehicles even during the night time.

The three major elephant corridors of Golapar, Fatehpur-Lamachaur and Lalkuan near Haldwani have seen mushrooming of human settlements, thus reducing the age-old path of the elephants.

The Surai-Kilpura elephant corridor near Khatima is also witnessing an increase of human settlement. Three of these corridors adjoining the Ramnagar-Mohaan border include 27 kms of highway.

Elephants
The Elephants from Nepal, as well as the Terai region in Uttar Pradesh, travel to Ramnagar, Corbett and the Kosi river, crossing the patch of the National Highway 121 along which the three elephant corridors — Kota, Chilkiya – Kota, and South Patlidun – Chilkiya are located. Pixabay

The elephant corridor in Dhikuli area has more than 150 commercial constructions due to which it is completely blocked. Construction in the Mohaan area and vehicular traffic during the night time is hampering the elephants from reaching the Kosi River.

Marriages, parties and the noise generated at commercial buildings and resorts at night is also causing disturbance to the wild animals.

Instead of preventing human interference in the forest areas, the forest department is allowing chili powder and crackers to prevent the pachyderm from coming onto the highway.

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“There are 11 functional corridors in Uttarakhand, but human activities are increasing around the age-old corridors. Elephants are distance migratory animal with sharp memory and if someone attacks them, they remember to return the attack,” said Rahi. (IANS)