Monday April 23, 2018
Home Uncategorized Valkyrie: NAS...

Valkyrie: NASA humanoid robot dances to techno music

0
//
86
Republish
Reprint

New Delhi: US Space agency NASA released a new video of a humanoid robot R5 on Thursday, popularly known as Valkyrie. The video shows the robot dancing and waving hands on techno music.

According to a newspaper, NASA has plans to send the humanoid robot to Mars and further into deeper space locations.

Although, it is needed to be understood that why is this dancing robot important for humans and the most probable reason is that it can very soon lead to a technology of robots living in tune with the human environment. The major reason of the video being published and awareness being created is so that people can soon expect a human-technology interphase.

The R5 is expected to be a stepping stone at finding a convenient way to achieve a safe expedition for humans working in a nuclear or any high explosive place. The aim of developing the robot was to make it function in an environment designed for humans. The developers of the R5, Darpa Robotics claims that Valkyrie, if sent into securing a nuclear reactor, can navigate walkways, doorways, and control rooms and be able to manipulate everything from buttons to valves.

Likewise, if the robot is sent into space, it would be helpful as it can effortlessly ride in a spacecraft designed for a human crew and also help astronauts explore the surface of Mars.

That is one of the major reasons for NASA being interested in a working humanoid. Though, for the humanoid to be useful as assistants on space missions, a navigational sense of the terrain along with dexterous and swift reactions as a human are yet to be installed. If the humanoid can’t lunge over a crater, it will of less importance as compared to humans.

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2015 NewsGram

Next Story

NASA’s Planet-Hunting Telescope Lifts Off In U.S.

Rocket with planet-hunting telescope finally lifts off

0
//
13
NASA's next mission.
TESS, the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, is shown in this conceptual illustration obtained by Reuters on March 28, 2018. NASA sent TESS into orbit from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket April 18, 2018, on a two-year mission. VOA

A Falcon 9 rocket blasted off Wednesday carrying SpaceX’s first high-priority science mission for NASA, a planet-hunting space telescope whose launch had been delayed for two days by a rocket-guidance glitch.

The Transit Exoplanet Survey Satellite, or TESS, lifted off from Florida’s Cape Canaveral Air Force Station at 6:51 p.m. EDT, starting the clock on a two-year quest to detect more worlds circling stars beyond our solar system that might harbor life.

The main-stage booster successfully separated from the upper stage of the rocket and headed back to Earth on a self-guided return flight to an unmanned landing vessel floating in the Atlantic.

Also Read: Why NASA sent human sperm to space?

The first stage, which can be recycled for future flights, then landed safely on the ocean platform, according to SpaceX launch team announcers on NASA TV.

Liftoff followed a postponement forced by a technical glitch in the rocket’s guidance-control system.  VOA

Next Story