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Video creators will not be able to make money until channel reaches 10,000 views: Youtube

he streaming service opened "YouTube Partner Programme" (YPP) to everyone in 2007 that allows anyone to sign up for the service

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New York, April 8, 2017: For millions of creators, making videos on YouTube is not just a creative outlet, it is a source of income. Announcing a change to its “YouTube Partner Programme”, video creators will not be able to make money until channel reaches 10,000 views.

The streaming service opened “YouTube Partner Programme” (YPP) to everyone in 2007 that allows anyone to sign up for the service, start uploading videos and immediately begin making money.

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“We will no longer serve ads on YPP videos until the channel reaches 10k lifetime views. This new threshold gives us enough information to determine the validity of a channel.It also allows us to confirm if a channel is following our community guidelines and advertiser policies,” said YouTube in a blog post.

By keeping the threshold to 10k views, we also ensure that there will be minimal impact on our aspiring creators. And, of course, any revenue earned on channels with under 10k views up until today will not be impacted, the post added.

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After a creator hits 10k lifetime views on their channel, the company will review their activity against YouTube policies and if everything looks good, channel will be added to YPP and will begin serving ads against their content.

“We want creators of all sizes to find opportunity on YouTube, and we believe this new application process will help ensure creator revenue continues to grow and end up in the right hands,” the post read. (IANS)

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YouTube videos may not help toddlers learn new things

The toddlers preferred watching dance performances by multiple artists with melodic music, advertisements for products they used, and videos showing toys and balloons

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YouTube Logo
YouTube Logo. wikimedia commons
  • Many videos may suggest that toddlers learn from Youtube videos
  • However, this might not be true
  • Toddlers are mostly attracted to music and dance videos

Do you let your toddler watch YouTube videos? It may not help them to learn new things, a study suggests.

The study results indicate that toddlers up to two years of age could be entertained and kept busy by their parents showing them YouTube clips on smartphones, but they may not learn anything from the videos.

Youtube may not help toddlers learn new things. Flickr
Youtube may not help toddlers learn new things. Flickr

“Young children are attracted to smartphones more than other forms of media and there is a need for more techno-behavioural studies on child-smartphone interaction,” said the lead author of the study, Savita Yadav from the Netaji Subhas Institute of Technology in New Delhi.

For the study, published in the journal Acta Paediatrica, the researchers recruited 55 toddlers between 6 to 24 months old, using professional and personal contacts and visited by two observers, for at least 10 minutes.

Also Read: YouTube videos can now be watched on WhatsApp messenger

The observers recorded the toddlers’ abilities to interact with touchscreens and identify people in videos and noted what videos attracted them the most. The toddlers were attracted to music at six months of age and interested in watching the videos at 12 months.

Make your kids play outdoors to boost their eyesight
Toddlers are more attracted towards music and dance videos. wikimedia commons

They could identify their parents in videos at 12 months and themselves by 24 months. They started touching the screen at 18 months and could press the buttons that appeared on the screen, but did not understand their use.

The toddlers preferred watching dance performances by multiple artists with melodic music, advertisements for products they used, and videos showing toys and balloons. IANS

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