Tuesday October 17, 2017

Watch it, weekend it: A personal and downloadable film festival

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By Atul Mishra

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Having been hell hammered in the humdrum hullabaloo of this week, it’s time to roll-coast your rides on cinematic reels. NewsGram brings to you your personal film festival to be enjoyed over the weekend.

Make this weekend a kink in your monotonous life with the magic of movies. Here’s what you should download and kill the hamartia of your busy life:

Mean Streets (1973)

Director – Martin Scorsese

A strange mixture of seedy violence, frank nudity and the sort of language you’d expect to hear from gangsters in New York’s Little Italy, the film is drenched in a veil of Catholic guilt (lead Harvey Keitel, as Charlie, a small-time hood who knows that he should get the hell out of the game, constantly chastises and tests himself) and seems to act as a permanent celluloid confessional for Scorsese’s baser instincts.

For this alone, this gritty Lower East Side drama would be worth noting, but it’s also shot through with hints of Scorsese’s virtuosity (the wonderful pop-infused soundtrack and the scene where a drunk Keitel teeters through a bar in one disorienting shot), and tantalizing glimpses of his future preoccupations: gangsters, the mores of masculinity and a rich and varied partnership with one Mr. Robert De Niro.

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(Citation: empireonline.com)

Blue is the Warmest Colour (2013)

Director – Abdellatif Kechiche

This film centers around a 15-year-old girl named Adèle (Exarchopoulos) who is climbing to adulthood and dreams of experiencing her first love. A handsome male classmate falls for her hard, but an unsettling erotic reverie upsets the romance before it begins. Adèle imagines that the mysterious, blue-haired girl she encountered in the street slips into her bed and possesses her with an overwhelming pleasure.

That blue-haired girl is a confident older art student named Emma (Seydoux), who will soon enter Adèle’s life for real, making way for an intense and complicated love story that spans a decade and is touchingly universal in its depiction. After Scorsese’s mafia masturbation, this film will leave you blue and light.

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When Nietzsche Wept (2007)

Director – Pinchas Perry

Set in the year 1882, director Pinchas Perry’s adaptation of Irvin D. Yalom’s fictional 1992 novel finds a depressed Friedrich Nietzsche seeking out the advice of pioneering psychoanalyst Josef Breuer for help in battling mental malaise. The portrayal of Nietzsche and that of the rare humanity of other characters as they confronted their obsessions and limitations will draw you into rapt attention at the next plot development.

The film is an exploration of the hypothetical conjunction of Nietzsche and Breuer’s and Freud’s destinies and the development of psychoanalysis, of which Nietzsche’s thoughts played a significant part. The scene where Nietzsche gets angry at the chauffeur for having beaten his horse and then getting mad and enraged, or the mad girl’s love making scene with Breuer and the epiphany that follows will leave you enthralled.

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Era of the 1980s Filmmaking was about bringing a change and make it happen: Veteran filmmaker Govind Nihalani

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Veteran filmmaker Govind Nihalani, Twitter (FTTI)

New Delhi, May 20, 2017: Veteran filmmaker Govind Nihalani on Saturday said the era of the 1980s was about bringing a change and make it happen in reaction to mainstream cinema. During that period, people witnessed movies from his generation of filmmakers including Satyajit Ray and Mrinal Sen.

At a time when films like “Qurbani”, “Alibaba Aur 40 Chor”, “Karz” and “Dostana” were ruling the box office with heavy duty star cast, glamour, dance and music, Nihalani says a movement of what was called “new cinema or parallel cinema” started to prove that such elements were not necessary to make a film work.

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“When you ask how the films were made at that time… we had this movement going of new cinema or parallel cinema. That movement essentially started as a reaction to mainstream cinema,” Nihalani said here, during a panel discussion at the Habitat Film Festival.

“It brought out a thought that it was not necessary that you follow a pattern which was established by what we call now mainstream cinema. Which means you must have presence of stars, music, dance, there should be a happy ending… that was very important and that good wins over evil all the time,” he added.

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The 76-year-old and the recipient of six National Film Awards said the filmmakers on the flip side proved that the glamour quotient was not necessary and that films that connect people can also be appreciated and work.

“You can make films that connect with the people. Other elements which connect you with the audience, which requires more human empathy, concern with anything other than being happy a the end of it all… The fact that you can make the difference. You can make the change happen.

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 “When we started making films and the young generation that came in, they came with the idea that you can change something and that change is possible. At the core of it that was the thought. The stories that we chose, it had no stars, glamorous locations… whole thing was about the change and that we make it happen. Stories were chosen in that mood,” he added.

The other panellists include director Buddhadeb Dasgupta and filmmaker Avinash Das.

The Habitat Film Festival is being held until May 28 at the India Habitat Centre.

Other movies which are yet to be screened here include “East is East”, “Maroon”, “Trapped”, “Cholai”, “Sadgati”, “Mukti Bhawan”, “Mantra”, “Aakrosh”, “Veeram”, “Ardh Satya” and “Haraamkhor”. (IANS)

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Saudi Arabia’s highest ranking Cleric warns of depravity of Cinemas and Musical concerts in the Country

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Crowd enjoying a concert, Wikimedia

New Delhi, Jan 15, 2017: Grand Mufti Abdulaziz al-sheikh, in an interview warned of the depravity of cinemas and musical concerts. Saudi Arabia’s highest ranking cleric, Grand Mufti Abdulaziz al-sheikh while responding to a question about the plans of the kingdom’s General Authority for Entertainment to license concerts and study opening cinemas, gave a statement saying, “Cinemas and music concerts would corrupt morals if allowed in the ultra-conservative kingdom.”

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The head of the Saudi supreme council of clerics said, “Cinemas might show movies that are libertine, lewd, immoral and atheist, because they rely on films imported to change our culture.”

Al-sheikh gave many statements opposing music concerts saying the concerts don’t really promote good music and are not at all a medium to connect with music. He insisted that music entertainment and opening cinemas represent a call for mixing between sexes. Al-sheikh said, “At the beginning they would assign areas for women, but then both men and women will end up in one area. This corrupts morals and destroys values.”

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Recently a show by American stand-up comedian and actor Mike Epps at a university campus in western Saudi Arabia was cancelled last month. However, he also said that entertainment through cultural and scientific media is okay. He urged the authorities, “not to open the doors for the evil.”

– prepared by Shambhavi Sinha of NewsGram. Twitter:  @shambhavispeaks

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Actress Rachel McAdams used to Meditate by practicing Medical Stitches on the set of Movie “Doctor Strange”

One of the actress' favourite things about her career is getting a chance to take a glimpse at others' lives and careers in her research for her characters

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Rachel Mcadams, Wikimedia

Los Angeles, Nov 14, 2016: Actress Rachel McAdams liked to meditate on the set of “Doctor Strange” by practicing medical stitches.

“My mum was a nursee and I just don’t posess that gene so I was always fascinated. It’s a job that takes so much guts. I shadowed a really great female neurosurgeon in Toronto and one in London, who taught me how to do stitches. It was very meditative, like knitting,” McAdams, who plays Christine Palmer — a doctor — in the film, told LOOK magazine.

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She added: “When I was bored on set, I would just pull out my… stitching wire. I don’t even know what it’s called, some doctor I am. But I would practise and it was great to jump into another world.”

One of the actress’ favourite things about her career is getting a chance to take a glimpse at others’ lives and careers in her research for her characters, reports femalefirst.co.uk.

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“I think it’s the thing I love most about my job, that you get to live so many lives in one lifetime. I have a bit of ADD (Attention Deficit Disorder) when it comes to things, so variety is the spice of life for me,” she said.

But the actress also enjoyed the “weird” experience of working with so much special effects and computer generated imagery.

“When I read one of the scenes, I was simultaneously daunted and excited because it was like nothing I’d ever seen before. It was fresh and different and weird. It was like choreographing a dance. And Benedict was actually there for a lot of it, up on wires, flying around the room for hours on end,” she said. (IANS)