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We have nuclear weapons to ward off India’s war threat: Pakistan

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Washington: Pakistan has made low-yield nuclear weapons to bridge the gap for war that India had created through its cold-start doctrine, Foreign Secretary Aizaz Chaudhry said on Tuesday.

This is the first concrete explanation from a senior Pakistani official on how Islamabad plans to deal with New Delhi’s so-called cold-start doctrine, now renamed the proactive strategy, Dawn reported.

It also is a rare confession of Pakistan’s decision to make tactical nuclear weapons to deal with the possible threat of an Indian aggression.

Briefing the Pakistani media on Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif’s visit to Washington, Chaudhry said Pakistan would not sign any nuclear deal with the US during Sharif’s visit.

Sharif arrives in Washington on Wednesday for a meeting with US President Barack Obama, scheduled for October 22.

“Our nuclear programme is one dimensional: stopping Indian aggression before it happens. It is not for starting a war. It is for deterrence,” the foreign secretary said.

Explaining India’s cold-start doctrine, Chaudhry said under this strategy India had already moved its cantonments close to the Pakistani border. This allowed India also to move its conventional weapons close to Pakistan along with other vehicles and fuel supplies.

By drastically reducing the time required to launch an aggression against Pakistan, India had “created a space for war,” Chaudhry said.

He explained that Pakistan’s “low-yield, tactical nuclear weapons” would make it difficult for India to launch a war against Pakistan while remaining under the nuclear threshold.

In reply to a question about Pakistan joining the Nuclear Suppliers Group, the foreign secretary said the US policy of getting India included in this group was “discriminatory”.

“We encourage the US to have a non-discriminatory approach, a balanced approach,” he said.

(IANS)

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Survey Shows That More Women Support Live-in Relationships in India

For long the concept and topic of live-in relationships has been taboo in India but the times are changing with a number of women coming out in its support, according to a survey.

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Hindu marriage. Pixabay

For long the concept and topic of live-in relationships has been taboo in India but the times are changing with a number of women coming out in its support, according to a survey.

Inshorts, a news app, conducted a poll in the second week of May capturing the views of 1.4 lakh netizens — 80 per cent being in the age group of 18-35 years, read a statement.

Women
representational image. pixabay

According to the survey, more than 80 per cent millennials think that live-in relationships are still considered a taboo in Indian society while more than 47 per cent Indians are of the opinion that marriage is better when choosing between marriage and lifelong live-ins.

More than 80 per cent Indians said that they do support live-ins as a way of life. Out of these, 26 per cent millennials went a step ahead and said that they would choose lifelong live-ins as an option over marriages.

On the other hand, 86 per cent Indians are of the opinion that lust is not the sole reason behind live-ins and more than 45 per cent say that it is more of compatibility testing before marriage.

Night-owl women not for long-term relationships: Study
Couple. pixabay

In the report, 45 per cent respondents have also said that since Indian society constantly judges unmarried couples staying together, any move by the judiciary to support this will not have any effect on their mindset.

Also Read: Night-owl women not for long-term relationships: Study

Azhar Iqubal, CEO and Co-founder, Inshorts said: “Live-in relationships, even after being legally recognised by the government, is a forbidden subject of discussion in Indian households. Our current survey was focused on capturing the sentiments of our Indian youth on such delicate issues.” (IANS)

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