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Women suffering from Urinary Incontinence are at a Higher Risk of it getting worse after Childbirth: Study

According to the study, women who have not given birth are less likely to suffer from urinary incontinence compared to pregnant women

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Pregnant woman. Pixabay
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London, November 10, 2016: Women who suffer from urinary incontinence are at a higher risk of it getting worse after childbirth, a study suggests.

According to the study, women who have not given birth are less likely to suffer from urinary incontinence compared to pregnant women.

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“Those who have urinary incontinence before a pregnancy are at higher risk of getting significantly worse after childbirth. This is a particularly vulnerable group and should, therefore, be attended to and counselled in antenatal care, and should be identified in maternal health,” said Maria Gyhagen, Researcher at the Gothenburg University, Sweden.

The study, published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, involved about 9,200 women aged 25-64 years who had never given birth. In the category of young women (25-35 years) with normal weight (BMI up to 25), 10 per cent said they had urinary incontinence.

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Among the oldest in the study (55-64 years) with a BMI over 35, almost every other woman experienced this type of incontinence. Seventeen per cent of women over 55 said they had to get up and urinate at least twice every night.

For those who reported incontinence, 25-30 per cent experienced their incontinence as bothersome.

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“The original purpose of the study was to measure the effects of pregnancy in itself and the potential protective effect of caesarean section. At the same time, we have collected the world’s first and most detailed data for this particular reference group,” Maria added.

The study confirms that problems are found in all groups, and that women have a weakness of the pelvic floor even if they have not previously given birth. (IANS)

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Depression Can Negatively Impact Heart Patients

In another study, the team found that heart attack patients diagnosed with depression were 54 percent more likely to be hospitalised

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Over 5 crore people in India are known to suffer depressive disorders Pixabay
Over 5 crore people in India are known to suffer depressive disorders Pixabay

Depression, even when undiagnosed, can have many negative effects on patients with cardiovascular diseases, including poor healthcare experiences and higher health costs, say researchers.

The study found that people at high risk of depression were more than five times more likely to have a poor self-perceived health status and almost four times more likely to be dissatisfied with their healthcare.

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Heart diseases can be worsened by Depression. Wikimedia Commons

Patients at high risk of depression had notably worse healthcare-related quality of life. They spent more on overall and out-of-pocket healthcare expenditures yearly.

They were more than two times more likely to be hospitalised and have an increased use of the emergency room, said the researchers while presenting the results at the American Heart Association’s Quality of Care and Outcomes Research Scientific Sessions 2018 in Virginia.

Also Read: Knee pain can trigger depression in elderly

“This could be because people at high risk for depression simply haven’t been diagnosed and treated for depression yet,” said Victor Okunrintemi, a research student at Baptist Health South Florida, a US-based non-profit.

In another study, the team found that heart attack patients diagnosed with depression were 54 per cent more likely to be hospitalised and 43 per cent more likely to have emergency room visits, compared to those not diagnosed with depression.

depression
Depression can be worsen. Wikimedia Commons

“Depression and heart attack often coexist, which has been associated with worse health experiences for these patients,” Okunrintemi said. About one-fifth of cardiovascular disease patients suffer from depression. “While we don’t know which comes first — depression or cardiovascular disease — the consensus is that depression is a risk marker for cardiovascular disease,” Okunrintemi said.

It means that “if you have cardiovascular disease, there is a higher likelihood that you could also have depression, when compared with the risk in the general population”, he added. IANS