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Young tribal woman inspires farming community to better livelihoods in Odisha

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A young tribal woman Raimati Ghiuria, not only proved to be a leader in conserving local traditional varieties of rice and millet seeds in her own land but also showed the path of development to the farming societies of Odisha’s Koraput district, an agricultural expert said.

Ghiuria is a leading woman farmer in Nuaguda village of Kundra block, which is in Odisha and has conserved 40 traditional landraces (lineages developed by farmers) of rice and 12 of millets and even trained about 340 neighbouring women farmers in conserving of local genetic resources.

She has also trained other women in the SRI (system of rice intensification) technique and line transplanting method of rice cultivation. These techniques have helped farmers in increasing their yields than what they were getting from traditional cultivation practices.

It all started nine years ago when Raimati became a member of a self-help group (SHG) in her village and participated in capacity-building training and awareness programmes at the MS Swaminathan Research Foundation (MSSRF) here.

“This inspired her to lead the group undertaking various micro-enterprises. This converted the group into a model SHG which won the Most Progressive SHG award given by the district administration in 2013,” Kartik Lenka of the MSSRF told agencies.

“We develop hybrid varieties of paddy and other foodgrains. It is also equally important to conserve indigenous species to maintain the natural biodiversity,” Raimati told the agency, adding that training on value addition to the rice and millet crops is also provided to the members of 27 other SHGs.

“They took this micro-enterprise as an alternative livelihood option and each family is earning an additional Rs 2,000 to Rs.3,000 per month,” Raimati said.

Because of her passionate leadership and multi-skilled activities, she was convened the best leadership award by the district administration and Jamsetji Tata National Virtual Academy Fellowship Award in 2014 for being “a leading grassroot academician”.

She recently participated in the ‘Prajatiya Khadyotsav (an agro forest food diversity festival) organised by Tata Steel’s Sukinda Chromite Mine in Jajpur district.

“Even as conserving traditional species is not lucrative against hybrid products, we need to conserve so that these indigenous products do not go extinct,” Lenka pointed out.

Aboriginal varieties have to be conserved for further research on producing high-yielding varieties. B.B panda of the Cuttack unit of the Central Rice Research Institute (CRRI) said.

“We can develop high-yielding varieties through these indigenous varieties. With the unavailability of the varieties, there would be no further improvement,” Panda told agencies.

It’s important to preserve and multiply the traditional seed varieties to improve the adaptation mechanism of farmers as climate change is a major concern for the country’s farming society.

The UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) has conferred the Globally Important Agricultural Heritage System (GIAHS) status has been conferred by UN Food and Agriculture Organisation to the traditional agricultural system being practised in the Koraput region.

This means the tribal people have an aboriginal knowledge system for their various agricultural practices that they use to check the viability of seeds before sowing, maintain soil fertility and conserve their landraces.(IANS)

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Do You Know there are only two Leaning Temples in The World? Visit the Leaning Temple of Huma in Sambalpur

Huma is about 23 kms towards the southern direction of Sambalpur, Odisha. and is connected with Sambalpur and other cities of Orissa by road. The temple is situated inside the village of Huma.

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Leaning Temple
The Leaning Temple of Huma. Wikimedia.

The famous Leaning Temple of Huma built in 1670 AD is dedicated to Lord Shiva. This temple is one of the only two leaning temples in the world. It was constructed by the ruler, Baliar Singh, the 5th ruler of the kingdom of Chauhan of Sambalpur, Odisha, India. The speciality of this temple is it’s structure skewed to one direction.

Reason Behind its Tilted Structure:

It is regarded that the reason for its tilted structure could be some interior dismounting of rocky bed at which this temple is positioned, either because of flood current inside the Mahanadi River or earthquake, thereby affecting the position of this original temple.  An interesting fact to be noted is that the other little temples inside the Hamlet are also tilted to various other directions.

The finest time to visit this leaning temple is October to March. Enshrine your spirituality during these months and celebrate the festive season in the town of Sambalpur, Odisha. Shivratri is believed to be the chief festival of this temple. Hence, it advances a huge gathering specially during Shivratri festival during March. You may also find ‘Kudo’ fishes on the bank of river Mahanadi near the temple who are given food by devotees as a part of the worship.

Leaning Temple
The Leaning Temple of Huma. Wikimedia.

How to Reach the Leaning Temple of Huma:

By Road – Huma is about 23 kms towards the southern direction of Sambalpur, Odisha. and is connected with Sambalpur and other cities of Orissa by road. The temple is situated inside the village of Huma.

By Rail – Sambalpur railway station is the closest station from Huma. You may find taxis and cabs to drop you 23 kms towards the temple of Huma.

By Air – Bhubaneshwar is the closest airport to Huma which is approximately 290 ms away from Huma. Catch a taxi or cab to drop you at the exact destination.

Leaning Temple
Huma Leaning Temple is one of the two leaning temples of the world. Wikimedia.

Where to stay:

There are various hotels nearby the temple at affordable prices presenting the pleasant view of the outside village.

-Prepared by Bhavana Rathi of NewsGram. Twitter @tweet_bhavana