Tuesday November 19, 2019

1 in 3 Children Under the Age of 5 Undernourished or Overweight

In addition, 340 million children suffer deficiencies of essential vitamins and minerals and 40 million under five were overweight or obese, a problem that has exploded in recent years

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Indians, Fatter, Undernourished
More Indians are getting fatter but fewer are undernourished as the nation goes from lessening the impact of hunger to developing the new health issue of obesity. (Representational image). Pixabay

At least one in every three children under five years of age is undernourished or overweight, according to a new Unicef report that sounds the alarm on the consequences of poor diets around the world.

In the report published on Monday, the Unicef warned that millions of children were eating too little of the food they need and too much of what they don’t need, adding “poor diets are now the main risk factor for the global burden of disease”, reports Efe news.

The result, according to Unicef, is that many of them are at risk of poor brain development, learning problems, poor immunity and increased infections and disease.

“Millions of children subsist on an unhealthy diet because they simply do not have a better choice,” said Unicef Executive Director Henrietta Fore.

malnutrition
Experts demand actions against poor diets to eradicate any ways of malnutrition by 2030, a global goal set by the Agenda for Sustainable Development. Pixabay

The report described the triple burden of malnutrition: undernutrition, hidden hunger and overweight.

In 2018, according to Unicef data, 149 million children under five years of age worldwide were stunted, and just under 50 million were wasted.

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Contrary to common belief, most wasted children were concentrated in Asia rather than in countries facing emergencies.

In addition, 340 million children suffer deficiencies of essential vitamins and minerals and 40 million under five were overweight or obese, a problem that has exploded in recent years. (IANS)

Next Story

Study Says, Early Signs of Diabetes Can be Observed in Children

The study tracked over 4,000 participants of the Children of the 90s study, a birth cohort established in Bristol in the early 1990s

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Diabetes
The research was conducted among young healthy people who were generally free of type 2 Diabetes and other chronic diseases to see how early in life the effects of diabetes susceptibility become visible. Pixabay

Researchers have found that early signs of adulthood type 2 Diabetes can be seen in children as young as 8 years old.

Type 2 diabetes is most often diagnosed in middle age or later, with its symptoms slowly developing over many years.

“It’s remarkable that we can see signs of adult diabetes in the blood from such a young age, this is about 50 years before it’s commonly diagnosed.

“This is not a clinical study; nearly all participants were free of diabetes and most will not go on to develop it. This is about liability to disease and how genetics can tell us something about how the disease develops,” said study researcher Joshua Bell from the University of Bristol in the UK.

The research was conducted among young healthy people who were generally free of type 2 diabetes and other chronic diseases to see how early in life the effects of diabetes susceptibility become visible.

The study tracked over 4,000 participants of the Children of the 90s study, a birth cohort established in Bristol in the early 1990s.

The researchers combined genetics with an approach called ‘metabolomics’, which involves measuring many small molecules in a blood sample to try and identify patterns that are unique to type 2 diabetes.

According to the findings, the research team analysed 162 pieces of genetic information and combined this with 200 measures of many small molecules in a blood sample, known as metabolics, to identify signs of type 2 diabetes.

Diabetes
Researchers have found that early signs of adulthood type 2 Diabetes can be seen in children as young as 8 years old. Pixabay

Data was taken once in childhood — at 8 years old, twice in adolescence aged 16 and 18 years and once in young adulthood aged 25 years.

They found levels of HDL cholesterol were reduced at age 8, while inflammatory glycoprotein acetyls and amino acids were elevated in 16 and 18 year old teenagers.

These metabolic features could be targeted to prevent young people from going on to develop type 2 diabetes in the future, the researchers said.

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The findings were presented at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) Annual Meeting in Barcelona. (IANS)