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These 10 Events after Independence changed India Forever

These ten events that happened in the past changed the country forever: 

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Independence Day
India is Celebrating its 71st Independence Day. Wikimedia
  • India celebrates the Independence day on 15th August
  • Since the partition and Independence of 1947, the country has come a long way on its own
  • We look at ten events that changed India forever

August 15, 2017: Today India celebrates its 71st Independence Day. In 1947, India became a sovereign nation independent of foreign rule, which came at the cost of a partition.

However, in these 71 years, India has come a long way to become a reputable nation in the international standings.

These ten events that happened in the past changed the country forever:

1. The Indo-Sino war of 1962: 

The 1962 war with China resulted in a humiliating defeat for India. While India was trying to stand on its own feet, independent from the foreigners, the savage offense from China was a blow to India’s confidence. The communist China attacked India on 20th October 1962 in Ladakh. Some say the war emerged out of nowhere. India did not see it coming, and was not prepared for it. The war, however, created animosity between two neighbors who are today the regional powers in the continent.

2. The Indo-Pak war of 1971: 

India and Pakistan have been at war since the partition. The 1971 war between the two countries lasted just 13 days, but a major event of history was written. Bangladesh was liberated from Pakistan and became an independent nation. With this creation, the geopolitics of the Indian subcontinent changed forever. A buffer zone in the form of Bangladesh had emerged. Further, the dispute of Teesta river was a continual issue until recently.

ALSO READ: PM Narendra Modi Condemns Religious Violence on 71st Indian Independence Day, Warns “Will Not Accept Violence In The Name Of Faith”

3. The National Emergency of 1975: 

Indira Gandhi government declared the National Emergency in 1975. The fundamental rights of the people and the constitution became worthless. Liberty was erased from the lives of the citizens. All in all, it was an attack on the very democracy of India. Many people were put behind bars and opposition was totally shut off.

4. Anti-Sikh Riots in 1984: 

The Khalistani militants who were demanding a separate state were terminated by the government of India as part of the Operation Bluestar. Indira Gandhi had ordered an attack on a militant group hiding in Golden Temple, Amritsar which is considered the Holiest place for Sikhs. What followed was the assassination of Indira Gandhi by two of her Sikh bodyguards in 1984. The agitated public thus initiated a revenge against innocent Sikhs. In Delhi alone, 2,733 Sikhs were killed. This incident still influences the political atmosphere of Punjab.

5. The VP Singh Mandal Commission: 

After independence, the scheduled castes and tribes were recognized as in dire need of social welfare and opportunity to equality. But the Other Backward Classes (OBC) were not involved. It was in 1990 when PM VP Singh declared that the Mandal Commission report, submitted in 1980, was accepted. It changed the phase of many spheres of citizen lives. Education universities were flooded by young people who sought retributive justice. Many enjoyed prosperity and better standards of living.

6. Liberalization in India: 

The Liberalization policy of 1991 was presented by Finance Minister Manmohan Singh. It proved to be the most historic policy in the country’s legacy. Economic reforms were introduced in the country. India was further integrated with global markets and finance. This led to India enjoying a massive rate of progress.

7. 1992 Demolition of Babri Masjid: 

Hindutva ideology possessed people destroyed the Babri Masjid upon learning that four hundred years ago a Muslim ruler had destroyed the Ram Temple where the Lord was born. Hindus demanded a Ram temple be built. This case became a famous dispute between two religions that once coexisted peacefully in one nation. It also influences the politics of the country today.

8. Gujarat Riots 2002: 

A train was set ablaze on fire in a conspiracy. The train was returning from Ayodhya to Gujarat and was carrying Hindus. In retaliation, hundreds of Muslims were killed. The Chief Minister of the state at that time was Narendra Modi, who is the current Prime Minister of India. He came under a lot of fire for the inability to control the situation.

9. Mumbai Terror 2008: 

Popularly referred to as the 26/11, this was the worst attack on the Indian soil. It revealed the loopholes in security arrangements of India and thus improved army and weaponry.

10. 2014 PM Elections:

The 2014 elections shocked Congress and their supporters. For the first time in the country, a party other than Congress received a majority in the Lok Sabha. The whole status quo of the country trembled. The party which is communal in nature was now at power.

– prepared by Saksham Narula of NewsGram. Twitter: @Saksham2394


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Dalai Lama says that India and China have great potential

The spiritual leader feels that both the countries are doing compassionate works

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Dalai Lama talks about India and China
Tibetan spiritual leader Dalai says that India and China can work together. VOA

New Delhi, Nov 19

Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama on Sunday said India and China have “great potential” and they could work together at a “practical level”.

“I think, a great potential… India and China combined are doing more compassionate work… At a practical level also. Imagine two billion people working together,” he told reporters here after inaugurating Smile Foundation’s initiative, The World of Children.

The spiritual leader, who has lived in India in self-imposed exile since 1959, said neither country had the “ability to destroy the other”.

“Whether you like it or not, you have to live side by side,” he said.

Underlining the ancient spiritual connection between the two countries, he said Chinese Buddhist Hsuan Tsang visited Nalanda (now in Bihar) and brought Nalanda Buddhist traditions to China.

“All thinkers of Nalanda are Indian. So Nalanda’s tradition is India’s tradition,” he said.

The Nalanda traditions had turned Tibetans, who were warriors, into more compassionate, peaceful and non-violent nation, he said.

“So sometimes in Delhi, teasing my Indian friend, (I say) if Tibet still remained in the previous way of life, like Mongols, Chinese invasion may not have taken place,” the Dalai Lama said in a lighter vein.

He said nobody in the world wanted violence but it was happening “because our minds are dominated by destructive emotions due to short-sightedness”.

“Nobody wants problems. Yet, many problems are our own creation.”

The Dalai Lama said the existing modern education was oriented to material values. India can take lead in improving the education system by combining modern education with ancient knowledge, he said. (IANS)

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Cleaning of Ganga is not impossible, but it is very difficult.

The holy river is also one of the most polluted river

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Ganga in Haridwar
A pile of garbage lies on the riverbank along the Ganges riverfront known as "Har ki Pauri," the most sacred spot in the Hindu holy town of Haridwar where devotees throng. VOA

– Saket Suman

About five years ago, when Financial Times journalist and author Victor Mallet began living in Delhi, he was shocked to discover that the Yamuna — “this beautiful river of Indian legend and art” — was chocked with untreated sewage and industrial waste after it had passed through the city on its way to Mathura, Agra and on to join the Ganga at Allahabad He wondered “how a river so sacred to so many Indians could also be so polluted and neglected” and then set out to record the plight of the Ganga.

His exhaustive journey led him to various key locations on the river, including its source at Gaumukh and Sagar Island and the Sunderbans at its mouth in the Bay of Bengal. This culminated in the publication of “River of Life, River of Death” (Oxford University Press/Rs 550/316 pages).

“My conclusion is that it is not impossible (to clean the Ganga) — but it is very difficult. Narendra Modi is the latest of several Indian prime ministers to announce plans to rescue the Ganga — in fact, I would say he has been the most fervent — but like his predecessors, he has struggled to implement these plans despite the availability of funds from India itself and from international donors such as the World Bank and Japan.

“Clearly, the Ganga has enormous problems of physical pollution from sewage, industrial toxins and pesticide run-off. Too much of the water is diverted for irrigation in the dry season, which can leave parts of the river without water before the monsoon. But with political will and public support — I don’t think anyone in India objects to saving the river — it can be done,” Mallet told IANS in an email interview from Hong Kong.

The important thing, he maintained, is to change mindsets and he noted in this context that it is quite common among devout Hindus to say: “Ma Ganga is so spiritually pure that nothing we throw in the river will sully her or make a difference.”

The author said that sensible holy men and environmentalists who care for the Ganga term this as nonsense — and the reason it’s not true is that the Ganga’s very spiritual power arises from its physical properties as a life-giver, as a provider of water and fertility.

“That’s why rivers have always been worshipped in ancient times, including in England. So if you destroy the river’s life-giving qualities through pollution, you destroy the source of her spiritual importance,” he added.

In the book, he also states that it is not impossible to clean the Ganges, “as river clean-ups in Europe and America have shown”.

Elaborating on this, he said: “When I was a child living in London, my mother always told me not to fall in the Thames because the river was so filthy that if I fell in I would have to go to hospital and have my stomach pumped! Yet today the Thames is clean — muddy, but virtually free of industrial pollution and untreated sewage — because successive governments and water and sanitation companies have stopped the pollution.

“The same is true of the Rhine in continental Europe and the Chicago river in the United States. The great thing about rivers is that you don’t have to scrub them clean — you just have to stop polluting them and the natural flow of the river does the rest.”

Mallet maintained that the record on the Ganga has so far been disappointing in terms of implementation, but hoped that there will be a change now that there is a new minister in charge.

“If you clean the Ganga by improving sanitation, you not only save the goddess, you also create thousands of jobs in infrastructure development, and save the lives of thousands of children who die each year because of bad water, poor hygiene and stomach bugs. Likewise, if India curbs its greenhouse gases — and this seems to be happening anyway because alternative energy such as solar power is now very competitive on price — then that will also help it to reduce the kind of air pollution that has recently been afflicting Delhi and the whole of North India,” he maintained.

Mallet went on to add that he learnt a lot about the mythology and the history of the river — and the history of India — in the course of his research for the book.

“In a way, India is so rich in civilisations and stories that you can never say you have completed your work as a researcher and writer. You can at least make a start, and also explain the contemporary political, social, religious and environmental issues that affect the river and the country as a whole,” Mallet said. (IANS)

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Manushi Chhillar from India Wins the Miss World 2017 Title

India's Manushi Chillar won the coveted Miss World 2017 pageant here, 16 years after Priyanka Chopra won the title in 2000.

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Miss World
Manushi Chhillar has been crowned as Miss World 2017. Instagram #ManushiChhillar

China, November 19: India’s Manushi Chhillar won the coveted Miss World 2017 pageant, 16 years after Priyanka Chopra won the title in 2000.

Chhillar competed against 108 contestants from various countries at a glittering event held at Sanya City Arena here.

Miss World 2016 winner Puerto Rico’s Stephanie Del Valle gave away the coveted crown to the winner.

Chhillar, who is from Haryana, had earlier this year won the Femina Miss India 2017.

Miss world
Anti Ageing was the official skin care expert for Manushi Chhillar at the Miss World 2017 pageant. Instagram #ManushiChhillar

India, England, France, Kenya and Mexico grabbed the top five spots at the peagant.

Manushi, born to doctor parents, studied in St. Thomas School in New Delhi and Bhagat Phool Singh Government Medical College for Women in Sonepat.

Her entire family including brother and sister were present and they looked excited watching Manushi grabbing top five spot.

As many as 108 beauty queens from different parts of the world participated in the prestigious pageant. (IANS)