Thursday May 23, 2019
Home India 109 Highly fr...

109 Highly fragile Glacial Lakes formed in Himachal Pradesh in last Two Years: Study

In the Satluj basin alone, the number of glacial lakes increased by 352 in the two-decade period from 1993 to 2013

0
//
Glacier, Wikimedia

Shimla, Oct 7, 2016: Highly fragile moraine-dammed lakes, an increasing phenomenon in the Himalayas, increased from 596 to 705 in barely two years in Himachal Pradesh, raising the spectre of glacial lake outburst floods, warns a state government study.

The study, conducted by the State Council for Science, Technology and Environment, says there is accelerated glacial melting in the Chenab, Ravi, Beas and Satluj river basins in the state, resulting in the formation of 109 new lakes between 2013 and 2015.

NewsGram brings to you latest new stories in India.

In the Satluj basin alone, the number of glacial lakes increased by 352 in the two-decade period from 1993 to 2013. However, between 2013 and 2015, unlike other three rivers basins, the Satluj has recorded no new addition of glacial lake formation.

The study said a number of such glacial lake outburst floods have occurred in the Nepal Himalayas. However, no such case has been reported in India so far.

The floods in Uttarakhand in 2013 have been correlated with the bursting of a lake.

Go to NewsGram and check out news related to political current issues.

“Regular monitoring of moraine-dammed lakes will help avert any future natural disasters like glacial lake outburst floods in the Himalayas,” Kunal Satyarthi, Joint Member Secretary of the Council, told IANS.

He said the Council’s Centre on Climate Change has been carrying out studies in the state’s Himalayas since 1993, which includes the monitoring of snow and glaciers, maintaining the inventory of the glaciers, seasonal snow cover mapping and monitoring of all moraine-dammed glacial lakes.

The Parchu lake, which originates from Tibet in China, is also being monitored regularly during ablation period from April to September every year.

Look for latest news from India in NewsGram.

The number of lakes in Chenab basin has increased to 192 in 2015 from 116 in 2013 — their number was only 55 in 2001.

In the Beas river basin, there were 67 lakes in 2013, while in 2015 they have increased to 89. Similarly, the Ravi basin saw an increase of 12 lakes during this period.

In the Satluj basin, out of 390 lakes, 42 lakes are spread over 10 hectares each. This basin has the maximum number of large lakes compared to the three other river basins.

“The lakes with area more than 10 hectares and area between 5-10 hectares can be seen as potential vulnerable sites,” Satyarthi said. (IANS)

Next Story

Climate Change Affects Developing Countries the Most: UN

The African continent could leverage to its advantage in the global fight against the impacts of climate change

0
Climate Change, Developing Countries
the least responsible countries suffer the most from the global threat that emanated from climate change. Pixabay

United Nations officials on Wednesday said developing nations were facing the brunt of climate change despite their little contribution to the problem.

A joint statement was made by Mary Robinson, Ireland’s former President and UN Special Envoy on El Nino and Climate, and Executive Secretary of the UN Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) Vera Songwe during a climate-focused meeting in Addis Ababa, the Ethiopian capital.

Robinson said, “those who suffer the worst effects of climate change are often the least responsible for it”.

She called for the need for climate justice as the least responsible countries suffer the most from the global threat that emanated from climate change, Xinhua news agency reported.

Climate Change, Developing Countries
Developing nations were facing the brunt of climate change despite their little contribution to the problem. Pixabay

Robinson was appointed UN Special Envoy along with Macharia Kamau of Kenya in 2016 to provide the leadership required to tackle climate-related challenges.

ECA’s Songwe said the African continent could leverage to its advantage in the global fight against the impacts of climate change.

“We didn’t create it, but we can profit the most from it. A climate smart economy is an extremely profitable economy. It’s an economy that will create more jobs and leave us cleaner and better,” Songwe said.

Mithika Mwenda, Executive Director of the Pan African Justice Alliance, said during the discussion climate justice was not getting the priority it deserved from governments.

Also Read- Delhi Metro Stations Double Up as Art Galleries

“Africa is most affected and impacted by climate change, but we don’t do much about it. We need strong governance systems to move the climate discourse and actions forward,” he said.

He urged the ECA to fortify collaboration with the African Union and the African Development Bank in line with the ClimDev-Africa programme that’s mandated by African leaders to create a solid foundation for Africa’s response to climate change. (IANS)