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Happy kids in School Uniform, pixabay

New Delhi, July 28, 2017:

Education system is slightly different in its way of approach across the globe. Although there are some evergreen debates like, the best age at which one should begin the compulsory education or the perfect length for a school day, the answers of various nationalities arrive at different conclusions. Fret no more, here you will find solutions to all these questions!

Education System around the world and how they cater to Child growth or influence them in certain ways –

  • In Australia, the School of the Air broadcasts lessons via radio signals to far-flung pupils living in remote areas.
  • The largest school in the world in terms of the number of students is in Lucknow, India. It is called City Montessori School and it has over 32,000 students.
  • China is the country where kids get the most homework.
  • Summer holidays last from the middle of December to early March in Chile, giving children three months off.
  • The country with the shortest school year and the longest school day is France.
  • Children in Germany are given a special cone called a Schultüte full of pens, pencils, mini books, snacks and other presents that can only be opened when they start school.
  • In Brazil, where lunch is an important event, children start school at 7 am and at noon goes home to eat with their parents.
  • England is home to the world’s old boarding school – The King’s School in Canterbury, which despite being established in 1567, provides a full modern education, complete with up-to-date quality equipment and supplies.
  • Even if it’s a weekend or a holiday, Russian children always start school on 1st September which is Knowledge Day.
  • The smallest school in the world is in Turin, Italy and with just one pupil.
  • Finland has one of the oldest schools starting ages in the world, as well as one of the most successful education systems. It’s seven years old.

Children learning in a classroom. Pixabay

  • Boys and girls are educated separately in Iran until they reach university. Even teachers must be of the same gender as the classes they teach.
  • Because of the flooding problems faced by the country, Bangladesh has no fewer than 100 boat schools. Each one has internet access, a library and is solar powered.
  • The World’s oldest teacher is America, Agnes Zhelesnik, who is 101 years old.
  • Knitting is one of the subjects taught in Icelandic schools.
  • The highest school in the world is Phumachangtang in Tibet, it is at 5,373 meters above the sea. We must say that education is delivered in unique ways and places across the world.

Children Gorging on Junk Food? Blame Father’s Education and High Income

Education is a vital part of life, we can all agree on that, and that’s why learning more about it can be really beneficial to all. We present you with the facts, figures, and quirks on schooling around the world and it can take you by surprise.

  • As of 2012, 31 million primary-school pupils worldwide have dropped out of school and an additional 32 million repeated a grade.
  • In the sub-Saharan, 11.07 million children leave school before completing their primary education. In South and West Asia, that number reaches 13.54 million.
  • While girls are less likely to begin school, boys are more likely to repeat grades or drop out altogether.
  • According to UNESCO, 61 million primary school-age children were not enrolled in school in 2010. Of these children, 47% were never expected to enter school, 26% attended school but left, and the remaining 27% are expected to attend school in the future.
  • Children living in a rural environment are twice more likely to be out of school than urban children. Additionally, children from the wealthiest 20% of the population are 4 times more likely to be in school than the poorest 20%.
  • In developing, low-income countries, every additional year of education can increase a person’s future income by an average of 10%.
  • Women who are less educated are having more children, on average 2.5 children, over the course of their lifetime when compared to more educated women, on average 1.7 children.
  • Women with a primary school education are 13% more likely to know that condoms can reduce their risk of contracting HIV/AIDS. An education can help decrease the spreading of this virus by promoting safer sexual practices.
  • 53% of the world’s out-of-school children are girls and 2/3 of the illiterate people in the world are women.
  • Education empowers women to make healthy decisions about their lives. For example, women in Mali with a secondary level education or higher have an average of 3 children, while those with no education have an average of 7.
  • The youth literacy rates in South America and Europe are among the highest with 90-100% literacy. The African continent, however, has areas with less than 50% literacy among children ages 18 and under.

– by Kritika Dua of NewsGram. Twitter @DKritika08


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