Monday November 19, 2018
Home Uncategorized 12,000-year-o...

12,000-year-old female human skull excavated in Mexico

0
//
Republish
Reprint

download

Mexico: A 12,000-year-old female human’s skull found in the Mexican Caribbean could be the oldest human remains ever unearthed in the Americas, a media report said on Friday.

The skull was excavated from an underground cave along the coast of Tulum, in Quintana Roo state, and could date back to between 10,000 and 12,000 years ago, according to Mexico’s National Autonomous University (UNAM).

The reconstruction of the skull to determine the sex, age and other characteristics was done by the Paris-based Atelier Daynes studio, lead researcher Alejandro Terrazas Mata of UNAM’s Anthropological Research Institute (IIA) said.

The University of Heidelberg was also involved in the discovery, Xinhua reported.

Researchers said that the remains appear to belong to none of the known indigenous groups in the Americas, “in part because the skull is not very similar to those of today’s indigenous groups”, said Mata.

The prevalent theory about the continent’s early settlers holds that a group of Asiatic people migrated across the Bering Strait some 15,000 years ago. Known as Paleoamericans, their craniofacial features share common ancestry with people from South Asia.

Another migration of a different group, who became the ancestors of the continent’s indigenous peoples also known as Amerindians, took place 9,000 years ago.

Mata said that the studio was substantiating whether the skull found belonged to an ancestor of the Amerindians or not. (IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2015 NewsGram

Next Story

Casualties Continue To Occur Post Hurricane Michael

Residents began to return to the devastated town in search of anything that could help them rebuild their lives.

0
Hurricane Michael
Wes Allen Jr., from left, sits with his father, Wes, his sister, Alison and his mother, Vicki, outside their room at a damaged motel, Oct. 16, 2018, in Panama City, Fla., where many residents continue to live in the aftermath of Hurricane Michael. Many residents rode out the storm and have no place to go, even though many of the motel's rooms are uninhabitable. VOA

Almost a week after Hurricane Michael devastated the Florida Panhandle, Mexico Beach Mayor Al Cathey said two more deaths had been confirmed in the small seaside town.

Cathey said Tuesday that the victims were a man and a woman who lived in separate homes and had not evacuated. He did not give the victims’ names or say how they died.

The announcement brought to 12 the number of people killed in Bay County, which includes Mexico Beach and another hard-hit town, Panama City.

Climate Change, hurricane michael
Scenes of devastation in Mexico Beach, Florida in the aftermath for Hurricane Michael.. VOA

The county took a direct hit from Hurricane Michael, one of the most intense hurricanes to ever hit the United States.

According to the Associated Press, the storm death toll stood at 16 in Florida and 10 combined in Virginia, Georgia and North Carolina.

Life in the hard-hit areas improved drastically as widespread cellphone service returned Tuesday for the first time since the storm.

Residents began to return to the devastated town in search of anything that could help them rebuild their lives.

Climate Change, hurricane michael
Scenes of devastation in Mexico Beach, Florida in the aftermath for Hurricane Michael. VOA

“We really don’t know our plan. We just came to take a first look of the house, analyze and maybe come up with a long-term plan, hopefully,” Joseph Bran of Mexico Beach said as he searched through the debris of his home.

Also Read: A Weakened Hurricane Florence Is Still Dangerous

Another Mexico Beach resident looked on the bright side. “I love it here, the sunset is beautiful, and the Gulf of Mexico got the best fishes of the world,” Scott Collins said. (VOA)